Stage name – Stage name — Wikipedia

Stage name

A stage name, also called a screen name, is a pseudonym used by performers and entertainers such as actors, comedians, music performers, clowns, and professional wrestlers.

Motivation to use a stage name

Performers often take a stage name because their real name is considered unattractive, dull, unintentionally amusing or difficult to pronounce or spell, or because it has been used by another notable individual or projects the wrong image. Sometimes a performer adopts a name that is unusual or outlandish to attract attention. Other performers such as pornography performers use a stage name to retain their anonymity. The equivalent concept among writers is called a nom de plume or pen name, while the term ring name is used in wrestling.

Family connection

Some individuals who are related to a celebrity take a different last name so that they are not perceived to have received undue benefit from their family connection. Examples of these include Nicolas Cage (real name Nicholas Coppola, nephew of Francis Ford Coppola) and Mike McGear (brother of Paul McCartney). Conversely, individuals who wish to receive benefit from their family connections may take that loved one’s first or last name. For example, Lon Chaney Sr.’s son Creighton spent a number of years appearing in minor roles before renaming himself Lon Chaney Jr.. Emilio Estévez chose not to take his father Martin Sheen’s professional name and uses his birth name; however, Emilio’s brother Carlos chose to use their father’s professional name, and took the name Charlie Sheen.

Guild and association rules

Guilds and associations that represent actors, such as the Screen Actors Guild in the United States and British Actors’ Equity Association in the United Kingdom, stipulate that no two members may have identical working names. An actor whose name has already been taken must choose a new name. Notable examples include Nathan Lane, whose birth name, Joseph Lane, was already in use, Stewart Granger, whose birth name was James Stewart, and Michael Keaton, born Michael Douglas. The latter chose the last name Keaton simply because he was an admirer of actress Diane Keaton, who in turn had changed her name from Diane Hall. Michael Andrew Fox became Michael J. Fox because a Michael Fox was already a member of the Screen Actors’ Guild.

A person hoping to become successful as an entertainer who has a name identical to a name already familiar to the public (in any field of endeavor) may change his/her name in order to not have his/her name evoke the other person with that name. By way of example, the actor/writer/director Albert Brooks, had been named «Albert Einstein» by his parents and chose a different second name so that his name would not be a distraction that would evoke the renowned physicist of the same name [Albert Einstein|] .

Ethnicity

In the past, a stage name was often used when a performer’s real name was considered to denote a specific ethnicity that faced potential discrimination. One of the most famous examples of this type of name change involved Freddie Mercury of Queen, who was born Farrokh Bulsara to Parsi parents; his name change was partly intended to conceal his heritage. Historically, Jews in Hollywood were encouraged to anglicize their names to avoid possible discrimination. This still happens to a degree (Jon Stewart, Brad Garrett, and Natalie Portman for instance), but the growing acceptance of ethnic performers in the performing arts has made this occurrence less frequent. Ramon Estévez changed his name to Martin Sheen, because he expected a better reception for an Irish name than a Hispanic name; his sons made divergent choices: Carlos Irwin Estévez is now Charlie Sheen, while Emilio Estévez left his name unchanged.

Ease of use

Another consideration in choosing a stage name is ease of use. The Actors’ Equity Association (AEA) advises performers to select a name that is easy for others to pronounce, spell, and remember. Some performers while paying great attention to their skills and abilities give little thought to the difference that a well-thought-out name can make to their career. Often it is only after the realization that a poorly chosen name results in an undesired impression that a person or group decides on a different name.

Actor Michael Caine was born Maurice Micklewhite and chose the name «Michael» because he preferred the sound of it to the less glamorous-sounding «Maurice».Verify credibility|date=September 2007 He chose the name «Caine» reputedly because at the precise instant he needed to decide upon his new stage name, he saw a cinema marquee for the then-current movie «The Caine Mutiny» and thought that it would make a good last name in conjunction with «Michael.» («Had I looked the other direction,» he would later quip, «I’d be known as Michael The One Hundred and One Dalmatians.»)

Relevance to image

Commonly in the music world, and especially those of heavy metal, punk rock, industrial and hip hop, musicians will rechristen themselves with names more menacing than their birth names. Examples include Slash, Sting, Darby Crash, Johnny Rotten, Zakk Wylde, Varg Vikernes, Nivek Ogre, Dimebag Darrell, Trey Azagthoth, Vintersorg and Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein as well as every member of Avenged Sevenfold (M. Shadows, The Rev, Synyster Gates, Zacky Vengeance, and Johnny Christ). Being that those genres pride themselves on a larger-than-life quality, larger-than-life names are desirable. Madonna, Prince, and Pink are pop music examples, though both Madonna and Prince were given those names at birth. Every member of the punk band The Ramones took the pseudonymous «Ramone» surname as part of their stage persona.

Actor John Wayne’s real name was Marion Morrison. He adopted the stage name because the name Marion was not masculine enough for the cowboy characters he portrayed.

Euphony and ease of remembrance

Some performers and artists may choose to simplify their name to make it easier to spell and pronounce (and easier for others to remember). For instance, Andy Warhol dropped an «a» from his original name, Warhola, while couturier Yves Mathieu-Saint-Laurent dropped the first of his three surnames. Rodolfo Alfonso Raffaello Piero Filiberto Guglielmi adopted the stage name Rudolph Valentino in part because American casting directors found his original surname difficult to pronounce.

Some surnames may carry unfortunate connotations in English. Hal Linden, born Harold Lipshitz, adopted his stage name for fear that the embedded obscenity in his original surname could cost him work. Ralph Lauren’s brother (who was his guardian) changed their family name from Lifshitz for a similar reason: fear of mockery.

Musical use

Some types of music are more associated with stage names than others. For example rap artists almost always use stage names, whereas «classical» composers and performers virtually never do. Some Algerian raï musicians use Cheb (for men) or Chaba (Chebba) for women. Both Arabic words mean «young» (e.g. as in Cheb Khaled, or «Young Khaled»). Some performers take a series of different stage names. The British pop singer successful in the 1970s as Alvin Stardust previously went by the stage name of «Shane Fenton» in the 1960s. He had been born «Bernard William Jewry.» Some performers will use different names in different settings. Charles Thompson, singer/songwriter for the alternative band the Pixies, was known in that band as «Black Francis». He was called «Frank Black» as a solo performer, and again called «Black Francis» in a reunited Pixies.

Many performers refer to their stage name as their «professional name.» In some cases performers subsequently adopt their stage name as their legal name. For instance, the former Robert Allen Zimmerman’s legal name has been Robert Dylan (Bob Dylan) since he changed it in New York CitySupreme Court fix
link=Wikipedia:Citation needed
text=citation needed
class=noprint Template-Fact
title=This claim needs references to reliable sources
date=August 2008
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cat-date=Category:Articles with unsourced statements
in August 1962. Elton John was born Reginald Dwight but changed his name by deed poll and subsequently took that name as his real name. When he was knighted, he became Sir Elton John rather than Sir Reginald Dwight. Sometimes a person who has adopted his professional name as a legal name will change it back to his birth name later on, as Elvis Costello (born Declan McManus) did in 1986. Names so adopted are technically no longer «stage names,» though are often perceived as such by the public.

Sometimes, but not exclusively, due to restrictive recording contracts, many musicians are known to have appeared on other performers’ recordings using names other than their own.

See also

* List of stage names
* Moniker

Wikimedia Foundation.
2010.

en.academic.ru

The stage names — Wikipedia

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STAGE NAME | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

These examples are from the Cambridge English Corpus and from sources on the web. Any opinions in the examples do not represent the opinion of the Cambridge Dictionary editors or of Cambridge University Press or its licensors.

He used his grandfather’s name for his stage name.

His stage name was inspired by his scruffy facial hair as well as his trademark loose-lined drawing style.

Coyote chose his stage name after a spiritual encounter with a coyote.

His stage name is a combination of his parents family names.

In many cases, performers have legally changed their name to their stage name.

His real name, as well as his former stage name, is.

The name of a wrestler’s character was not always the person’s birth name, as wrestlers often use a stage name to portray their character.

The nickname not only stuck but automatically became her stage name.

In some cases performers subsequently adopt their stage name as their legal name.

It is possible that the university’s name influenced her choice of stage name.

She experimented with a change in stage name that she later regretted.

Here he received what would later become his stage name after letting many of the women into the parties for free.

His stage name indicated his age when he started performing.

Despite his stage name, he has never worked for a cable company in any capacity.

He subsequently retained his war name as his stage name, once the war was over.

 See all examples of stage name

dictionary.cambridge.org

Stage name | World Music Wiki

A stage name, also called a showbiz name or screen name, is a Fake Name used by performers and entertainers such as actors, wrestlers, comedians, and musicians.

    Motivation to use a stage nameEdit

    A performer will often take a stage name because his/her real name is considered unattractive, dull, unintentionally amusing or difficult to pronounce or spell, or because it has been used by another notable individual or because it projects an undesired image. Sometimes a performer adopts a name that is unusual or outlandish to attract attention. Other performers use a stage name in order to retain anonymity. The equivalent concept among writers is called a nom de plume or pen name, while the term ring name is used in professional wrestling. In radio, the term «radio name» or «air name» is used. (e.g. well-known talk radio host Rush Limbaugh, who now uses his real name, was known under the radio name Jeff Christie in his days as a top-40 disk jockey.)

    Family ConnectionsEdit

    Some individuals who are related to a celebrity take a different last name so that they are not perceived to have received undue advantage from their family connection. Examples of these include Nicolas Cage (real name Nicolas Coppola, nephew of Francis Ford Coppola), Luka Bloom (real name Kevin Barry Moore, brother of Christy Moore) and Mike McGear (brother of Paul McCartney). Conversely, individuals who wish to receive benefit from their family connections may take that person’s first or last name. For example, Lon Chaney Sr.’s son Creighton spent a number of years appearing in minor roles before renaming himself Lon Chaney Jr. Actress Rebecca Isabelle Laemmle rechristened herself Carla Laemmle in reference to her uncle, Universal Studios head Carl Laemmle. Emilio Estévez and his sister Renee chose not to take their father Martin Sheen’s professional name and use their birth names; however, their brother Carlos chose to use their father’s professional name, and took the name Charlie Sheen.

    Guild and association rulesEdit

    Guilds and associations that represent actors, such as the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) in the United States and British Actors’ Equity Association in the United Kingdom, stipulate that no two members may have identical working names. An actor whose name has already been taken must choose a new name. Notable examples include David Tennant, born David McDonald, who said in an interview that he adopted the surname Tennant after reading Smash Hits magazine. Nathan Lane, whose birth name, Joseph Lane, was already in use, Stewart Granger, whose birth name was James Stewart, and Michael Keaton, born Michael Douglas. The latter chose the last name Keaton simply because he was an admirer of actor Buster Keaton. Michael Andrew Fox became Michael J. Fox because a Michael Fox was already a member of the Screen Actors’ Guild. Ugly Betty actress Vanessa Williams officially uses «Vanessa L. Williams» due to SAG guidelines, although the other actress by the same name (Vanessa A. Williams) is arguably less notable. Similarly, David Walliams changed one letter in his surname due to there being another «David Williams». Terry O’Quinn of Lost fame changed his surname from Quinn to O’Quinn as another registered actor already had the name Terrance Quinn

    A person hoping to become successful as an entertainer who has a name identical to a name already familiar to the public (in any field of endeavor) may change his/her name in order to not have his/her name evoke the other person with that name. By way of example, the actor/writer/director Albert Brooks was named «Albert Einstein» by his parents and chose a different second name so that his name would not be a distraction that would evoke the renowned physicist of the same name. Singer Katy Perry, born Katheryn Elizabeth Hudson released her self-titled album under the name Katy Hudson, but later changed her surname to Perry to avoid confusion with actress Kate Hudson.

    Involuntary Name ChangesEdit

    A performer may also have had their stage name chosen for them by their agent (such was the case with Barbara Eden, born Barbara Jean Huffman; her agent gave her a list of stage names and told her to «pick one»). Joan Rivers (born Joan Alexandra Molinsky) went one step further and named herself after a former agent, Tony Rivers, when he told her to change her name.

    Cary Grant (born Archibald Leach) had his name selected for him by Paramount Pictures. He had been using the name «Cary Lockwood», but the studio decided against it, deeming it too similar to another actor working at the time. Cary and the studio eventually settled on «Cary Grant» (Cary thought the letters «C» and «G» to be lucky: they had brought previous success for both Clark Gable and Gary Cooper).

    EthnicityEdit

    In the past, a stage name was often used when a performer’s real name was considered to denote a specific ethnicity that faced potential discrimination. An example of this type of name change involved Freddie Mercury of the British rock band Queen, who was born Farrokh Bulsara to Parsi parents; his name change was partly intended to conceal his heritage. The actor Kal Penn changed his name from Kalpen Modi for professional purposes; after changing his name, calls back increased by 50%.Historically, Jews in Hollywood were encouraged to anglicize their names to avoid possible discrimination. This still happens to a degree (Jason Alexander, Jon Stewart, Brad Garrett, Jonah Hill, Winona Ryder and Natalie Portman for instance), but the growing acceptance of ethnic performers in the performing arts has made this occurrence less frequent.Ramón Estévez changed his name to Martin Sheen because he expected a better reception for an Irish name than a Spanish name; his sons made divergent choices: Carlos Irwin Estévez is now Charlie Sheen, while Emilio Estévez left his name unchanged. German-born actor Hans Gudegast adopted the non-German stage name of Eric Braeden. Cherilyn Sarkisian is now known to the world by the single name Cher.

    In a more extreme example, the American Spanish actress Margarita Carmen Cansino underwent electrology to change her hairline to a more Northern European appearance, and was renamed Rita Hayworth.

    Also, legendary actor Anthony Quinn was also advised to anglicize his name, as ‘Antonio Rodolfo Quinn Oaxaca’ was considered too ‘ethnic’ for Hollywood at the time.

    Ease of UseEdit

    Another consideration in choosing a stage name is ease of use. The Actors’ Equity Association (AEA) advises performers to select a name that is easy for others to pronounce, spell, and remember. Some performers while paying great attention to their skills and abilities give little thought to the difference that a well-thought-out name can make to their career. Often it is only after the realization that a poorly chosen name results in an undesired impression that a person or group decides on a different name.

    Actor Michael Caine was born Maurice Micklewhite and chose the name Michael because he preferred the sound of it to the less glamorous-sounding «Maurice».He chose the name Caine reputedly because at the precise instant he needed to decide upon his new stage name, he saw a cinema marquee for the then-current movie The Caine Mutiny and thought that it would make a good last name in conjunction with Michael. («Had I looked the other direction,» he would later quip, «I’d be known as Michael The One Hundred and One Dalmatians.»)

    Relevance to ImageEdit

    Commonly in the music world, and especially those of heavy metal, punk rock, industrial and hip hop, musicians will rename themselves with names more menacing than their birth names. Examples include Davey Havok, Slash, Sting, Darby Crash, Sid Vicious, Johnny Rotten, Zakk Wylde, Nikki Sixx, Count Grishnackh, Necrobutcher, Blasphemer, Nivek Ogre, Rob Zombie, Dimebag Darrell, Trey Azagthoth and Doyle Wolfgang von Frankenstein as well as every member of Avenged Sevenfold (M. Shadows, Synyster Gates, Zacky Vengeance, Johnny Christ, and The Rev). Being that those genres pride themselves on a larger-than-life quality, larger-than-life names are desirable. Madonna, Lady Gaga, Prince, and Pink are pop music examples, though both Madonna and Prince were given those names at birth (Lady Gaga named herself after the song «Radio Gaga» by Queen). Every member of the punk band The Ramones took the pseudonymous «Ramone» surname as part of their collective stage persona.

    Actor John Wayne’s real name was Marion Morrison. He adopted the stage name because the name Marion had since his birth become a female name and he felt at odds with the masculine cowboy characters he portrayed. Similarly, Norma Jeane Baker changed her name to the far more glamorous-sounding Marilyn Monroe.

    Euphony and Ease of remembranceEdit

    Some performers and artists may choose to simplify their name to make it easier to spell and pronounce (and easier for others to remember). For instance, Andy Warhol dropped an «a» from his original name, Warhola, while couturier Yves Mathieu-Saint-Laurent dropped the first of his two surnames. Rodolfo Alfonso Raffaello Piero Filiberto Guglielmi adopted the stage name Rudolph Valentino in part because American casting directors found his original surname difficult to pronounce. Singer George Michael (the son of a Greek Cypriot restaurateur in North London) was born Georgios Kyriacos Panayiotou.

    Some surnames may carry unfortunate connotations in English. Hal Linden, born Harold Lipshitz, adopted his stage name for fear that the embedded obscenity in his original surname could cost him work. Ralph Lauren’s brother (who was his guardian) changed their family name from Lifshitz for a similar reason: fear of mockery.

    Musical UseEdit

    Some types of music are more associated with stage names than others. For example hip hop artists almost always use stage names, whereas «classical» composers and performers virtually never do. Some Algerian raï musicians use the prefix Cheb (for men) or Chaba (Chebba) for women. Both Arabic words mean «young» (e.g. as in Cheb Khaled, or «Young Khaled»). Some performers take a series of different stage names. The British pop singer successful in the 1970s as Alvin Stardust previously went by the stage name of Shane Fenton in the 1960s. He had been born Bernard William Jewry. Some performers will use different names in different settings. Charles Thompson, singer/songwriter for the alternative band the Pixies, was known in that band as Black Francis. He was called Frank Black as a solo performer, and again called Black Francis in a reunited Pixies.

    Many performers refer to their stage name as their «professional name». In some cases performers subsequently adopt their stage name as their legal name. For instance, the former Robert Allen Zimmerman’s legal name has been Robert Dylan (Bob Dylan) since he changed it in New York City Supreme Court in August 1962.Elton John was born Reginald Dwight but changed his name by deed poll, making Elton John his real name. When he was knighted, he became Sir Elton John rather than Sir Reginald Dwight. Elvis Costello (born Declan MacManus), who had adopted his professional name as a legal name, changed it back to his birth name in 1986.

    Due to recording contracts which do not permit them to openly record for competing companies, musicians may appear on other performers’ recordings using other names.

    worldmusic.wikia.com

    Stage Name Generator | Rum and Monkey

    Which generation do you belong to?

    Greatest Generation (before 1946)
    Baby Boomer (1946-1964)
    Generation X (1965-1984)
    Millennial (1982-2004)
    Generation Alpha (2005 till now)

    What do you currently do in life?

    Good question — I am still trying to figure that out!
    I work in an office
    I do NOT work in an office
    Full time student and rockin’ it!
    I am a traveler

    What is your deepest desire?

    Inner and outer peace
    A compassionate world
    Personal growth
    Finding true love
    Understanding other people

    What,would you say, is your strongest quality?

    I am a bit of a bright spark — Intelligence
    I am always helping out — Kindness
    My life is a crazy explosion of shapes and colors — Creativity
    I am a survivor — Strength
    I know what I want — Confidence

    What role do you play in your friendships?

    I like to make my friends laugh
    They always come to me for advice
    I tend to be the peacemaker between friends
    I offer support where I can
    I am usually the one to help them fix things

    How often do you work out?

    Work out? Are you serious right now?
    Every day — if walking through the shops count as working out!
    Getting out of bed is enough of a workout for me!
    The people at the gym know me by name
    Fitness is life!

    Why did you take this test?

    It looked like fun
    I was bored
    My friends encouraged me to do so
    All of the above
    None of the above

    What do you dream about when you sleep?

    I often dream that I am drowning
    Fighting or running away from war
    I dream that I am flying
    I often dream of animals
    People and relationships

    If you were an animal, what would you be?

    A dog or a wolf
    A tiger/lion/jaguar
    Gazelle/horse/giraffe
    Owl/falcon/eagle
    A dolphin

    Do you have a bucket list?

    Nope — I am living life one day at a time
    Yes — I am halfway through it already!
    Yes, but I only have a couple of items on it
    No, but I do know what I want in life
    Yes, but it is hard to get to!

    Pick one of the below. You are…

    Male
    Female

    Now enter your name and click the button:

    Next

    rumandmonkey.com

    6 Reasons a Stage Name Might Be Right for You

    Not all actors need or use stage names, but for some, it’s the right way to go. Some actors choose to legally change their names in court, but many can use and register stage names without ever having to legally change it. In fact, some actors choose to simultaneously use their real names and stage names to keep their work and personal lives separate. So how do you discern whether or not to use a stage name?

    1. If you need to avoid union confusion. To avoid confusion, SAG-AFTRA does not allow working actors to use identical screen names. If an actor’s name is already being utilized, the new union member must choose a new name. Sometimes that change is as simple as adding or removing a middle initial (like Michael Fox versus Michael J. Fox), but sometimes the name change is more significant and involved. For instance, Michael Keaton was born Michael Douglas, but his career was preceded by Michael Douglas, who beat him to the union registry.

    2. If you have a very popular or common name. Union rules aside, actors take stage names for a number of other reasons. If your name is a common one, there are most likely other people with your same name. Actors with particularly common last names (Smith, Johnson, etc.) are likely to change their names. Maybe that’s why Caryn Elaine Johnson became Whoopi Goldberg.

    3. If someone famous is already using your name. Actor-writer-director Albert Brooks was born Albert Einstein and changed his surname for obvious reasons. Singer-actor David Bowie (born David Robert Jones) changed his name to avoid confusion with singer and actor Davy Jones (of The Monkees).

    Many names are inspired or refer directly to real world things that may be seemingly unflattering. Some surnames (like Belcher, Hooker, etc.) have meanings that can complicate actors’ attempts to cultivate the professional image they want. Classic Hollywood movie actor Cary Grant’s original name Archibald Leach seemed less romantic than what Paramount Pictures wanted for its leading man.

    4. If your name doesn’t represent who you are. Of course, just like people, all names come from somewhere. However, if your name clearly comes from a specific place and you look like you come from someplace else entirely, you might consider using a show name. For instance, a fair, blonde Latina who does not speak Spanish may choose a show name that conceals or obscures her heritage. If your name suggests a strong identification with a language other than English, a stage name might be something to consider.

    Stage names were also traditionally used to avoid discrimination or the potential for it. Ethnic names were commonly “Anglicized” to make them seem more English or American, or simply to make them more easily remembered and understood to the American film and television industry at large.

    But ethnic surnames can also be a great advantage for actors as television and commercials like to diversify their casts. Jerry Rivers changed his professional name to Geraldo Rivera. David Boreanaz, (“Bones,” “Angel,” “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”) opted not to change his surname. In the 1950s, his father used Thomas or Roberts instead of Boreanaz. For actors today, highlighting or obscuring ethnic heritage are equally common motives for creating and using an actor stage name.

    5. If a different name will be easier to use and understand. AEA recommends performers use names that are easy for others to say, spell, and remember. Asa Butterfield (“Hugo,” “Ender’s Game”) is easy enough to say and remember, but his full name, Asa Maxwell Thornton Farr Butterfield would be a little tough to squeeze onto a headshot. Joaquin Phoenix first worked as Leaf Phoenix because it was easier for him to say as a child actor, and Leaf fit in with the nature names of his other working family members, like his older brother River.

    6. If you need to protect your identity. Working professionally under one name while using your “regular name” at home helps some actors separate their working and private lives. For child actors, stage names can provide an added layer of identity insulation, which parents may prefer for their child’s safety. Acting credits may be listed under the stage name while the legal name or birth name appears on school enrollment, sports rosters, and any local event mentions.

    Actors can work a lifetime under a stage name without ever changing their name legally. Checks and contracts are made out to legal names while credits on screen and on professional websites like IMDb use the stage names.

    If you decide you need a stage name, what you’re changing your name to depends on why you’re changing it!

    Like this advice? Check out more from our Backstage Experts!

    Mae Ross

    Mae Ross is the Owner/ Director of L.A.’s highly acclaimed actor training center, 3-2-1 Acting Studios. Her leadership has garnered 3-2-1 consistent recognition as Hollywood’s premier on-camera acting school for kids, teens, and adults. She has launched hundreds of successful acting careers with her expert on-camera coaching and professional guidance.

    See full bio and articles here!

    www.backstage.com

    Stage Name | Definition of Stage Name by Merriam-Webster

    Definition of stage name 

    : a name used by an actor instead of the actor’s real name

    www.merriam-webster.com

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