Sentence analysis – Sentence analysis

106. Sentence Analysis

Ability to analyze sentences will help us to understand passages that puzzle us in our reading and to revise phrases that seem awkward in our writing. A thorough knowledge of sentence structure will mean that, as we talk and write, words will slip into their proper places.

In analyzing a simple sentence we point out the subject and Us modifiers, — adjectives, adjective phrases, or adjective clauses; the predicate and its modifiers, — adverbs, adverb phrases, or adverb clauses; the object and its modifiers, — adjectives, adjective phrases, or adjective clauses.

The following sentences have been so arranged that the eye can see instantly the relation of the parts:

Subject and modifiers

Predicate and modifiers

Object and modifiers

Subjective Complement

I

made on a soft summer morning in the genial month of May to Windsor Castle

an excursion

It

is

a place (subjective complement) full of storied associations

If the sentence is complex, we separate the main from the subordinate clause and analyze each in turn. We must be prepared to explain the relation between the main and the subordinate clause.

A compound sentence is separated into its clauses, and each is analyzed as a simple sentence would be.

Exercises

309. The following sentences are intended to illustrate in simple, progressive fashion the common grammatical constructions that have proved troublesome. Analyze each of them, and be prepared to explain the syntax of any word.

1. I followed them.

2. Every paragraph should be indented.

3. All was bustle and hurry.

4. The seizing of the fine group of islands is a feat worthy of notice.

5. Every face was pale.

6. The vessel was very near now.

7. Neatness should be conspicuous in all our work.

8. Several women on deck heard this remark.

9. The captain’s daughter wrote the incident years afterward.

10. The sight of the soldiers, standing with guns pointed at me, sent a shiver through my whole body.

11. Three men emptied a hogshead, pulled it on deck, and beat it loudly.

12. Use a hyphen to mark the division and put it at the end of the line.

13. Early English writers spelled some words in several ways, but in our time it is important never to vary the spelling of a word.

14. Every face was pale with fear; some talked, others wept.

15. If we like, we may try our hand at a little verse.

16. We must not divide a word at the end of a line unless we can divide it by syllables.

17. Most of us will read a letter before we will read a book.

18. One day while I was riding in an electric car, a man got in with a little child.

19. When paragraphs are quoted, the quotation marks are placed at the beginning of each paragraph and at the end of the last one.

20. The woods were largely pine, though yellow birch, beech, and maple were common.

21. He uttered the word «Silence!» so harshly that no one dared do otherwise than obey.

22. Whether a paper be a note to a friend or a petition to the President of the United States, it should be neat and attractive.

23. My cousin sent me a letter from the Philippines, where he is with his company.

24. No words save those of welcome were spoken until I had eaten heartily.

25. The stream in the Doone country looked smaller than it seemed in the book.

26. The title of a book or paper may be quoted or italicized, as the writer prefers.

27. The loud cries of a pair of blue jays resounded from a group of cedar trees a few minutes after the sun rose.

28. Happy is he who can see his defects; happier he who, with stout heart and infinite patience, toils incessantly to overcome them.

29. Our friends prize highly those letters into which we put much of ourselves.

30. A group of sentences which relate to a single division of the subject is called a paragraph.

31. There are scores of words that we see day after day and yet misspell.

32. The criticisms you get from your classmates should be valuable.

33. By careful observation we learn in what way many things are made.

34. Whatever the teacher wishes the heading to include should be separated from what follows by a blank space.

35. What first strikes the eye of the reader will repel or attract.

36. We should remember that we can never tell who may read our letters or how long they may be preserved.

37. They heard that the man who had killed that deer was fined. 38. «The Mother Tongue» suggests that the book would appeal to all who speak the English language.

39. We are pursued by a hostile cruiser, and if you care for your life, you had better go to the cabin.

40. Three paragraphs are indicated, but I see no reason why there should be more than one paragraph.

310. Analyze the following sentences:

1. The black cow is in the pasture near the road.

2. We will all go with you if you are willing.

3. We know whom you mean.

4. I said, «Dick, you are right.»

5. When they learned that it was I, they were very happy.

6. They were surprised when they found it was I.

7. Man can neither drink steam nor eat stone.

311. Analyze the following sentences:

Note. If the teacher thinks best, these sentences may be omitted until the second year.

1. Our lesson in arithmetic to-day was a review of decimal fractions.

2. In American history we are studying about the causes of the Civil War.

3. The other day when on my way to school, I saw a peculiar automobile accident.

4. Good manners are a social and a business asset.

5. Once upon a time a wolf met Little Red Riding Hood.

6. Raphael’s «Sistine Madonna» is a picture that will repay careful study.

7. The other morning I saw two sparrows attack a small gray bird that looked like a woodpecker.

8. He is one of the boys who have received prizes.

9. Boy after boy said he wished to go.

10. Rip Van Winkle, however, was one of those happy mortals, of foolish, well-oiled dispositions, who take the world easy.

11. Fortunately for the English tourists, the people of Switzerland proved truly hospitable.

12. If there be any difference, the former are rather the more substantial.

13. Were he still a politician, and as brilliant a one as ever, he could no longer maintain anything like the same position in the political world.

14. If he have strength of arm, well and good; it is one species of superiority.

15. Making her way round the foot of the rock, she suddenly found herself close to our tent.

16. Having a taste for sights of this kind, and imagining, likewise, that the illumination of the bonfire might reveal some profundity of moral truth heretofore hidden in mist or darkness, I made it convenient to journey thither and be present.

17. He seems not to believe that «he laughs best who laughs last.» 18. It is probable that the burglar entered at the front window, for it was found open and it has no lock. •

19. The man complied cheerfully with his employer’s request.

20. To make a misstep would be certain death.

21. The difficulty was to get a practical solution of the problem.

22. We heard the bells ringing in the distant steeple.

23. No one had courage to enter.

24. A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.

25. About, about, in reel and rout.

The death fires danced at night.

26. What is an abundance to a frugal person will scarcely seem a plenty to a spendthrift.

27. John Gilpin was a citizen.

Of credit and renown.

28. Tell me not in mournful numbers.

Life is but an empty dream.

29. The very external aspect of the proud old pile is enough to inspire high thought.

30. It rears its irregular walls and massive towers, like a mural crown, round the brow of a lofty ridge, waves its royal banner in the clouds, and looks down, with a lordly air, upon the surrounding world.

31. It was upon a delicious summer morning, before the sun had assumed its scorching power, and while the dews yet cooled and perfumed the air, that a youth, coming from the northeastward, approached the ford of a small river, or rather a large brook, tributary to the Cher, near to the royal Castle of Plessis-les-Tours, whose dark and multiplied battlements rose in the background over the extensive forest with which they were surrounded.

32. On the bank of the above-mentioned brook, opposite to that which the traveler was approaching, two men, who appeared in deep conversation, seemed from time to time to watch his motions; for as their station was much more elevated, they could remark him at considerable distance.

812. In class, write a simple sentence, consisting of (1) a subject, (2) a predicate, (3) an object.

818. Add to the sentence you have just written, or to one similar in form, (1) an adjective, (2) an adverb.

314. In class, write sentences containing (1) a compound subject, (2) a compound predicate, (3) an adjective modified by an adverb, (4) a clause used as direct object, (5) a clause used as subject, (6) an adjective clause.

815. Write (1) a compound sentence containing an adjective phrase; (2) one containing an adverbial phrase; (3) one containing an infinitive phrase used as a noun.

816. If possible, make the three sentences you have just written complex, and note the difference in effect. (See sect.

115).

817. Write (1) a complex sentence containing an adverbial clause denoting time; (2) one containing a clause of purpose; (3) one containing a clause of degree; (4) one containing a clause denoting condition; (5) one containing a clause of result.

818. If possible, make the five sentences you have just written compound. In how many cases is the change desirable ?

819. Write complex sentences containing (1) a clause used as subjective complement, (2) a clause of concession, (3) a clause denoting manner, (4) a clause denoting place, (5) a clause denoting cause.

820. If possible, make the five sentences you have just written compound. In how many instances is the change an improvement ?

821. Write complex sentences containing (1) a phrase denoting place; (2) a clause denoting place; (3) a phrase denoting time; (4) a clause denoting time; (5) an adjective clause and an adjective phrase; (6) a noun phrase and a noun clause.

822. If possible, make the six sentences you have just written compound. Is there a gain in any instance?

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Analysis of a complex sentence

Posted by Manjusha. Filed in English Grammar

A complex sentence consists of one main clause and one or more subordinate clauses.

The first thing we need to do to analyze a complex sentence is to find out the main or principal clause.

Study the example sentence given below.


    Whenever he was asked that question, the old man who lived in that house answered that the earth was flat.

The sentence given above consists of four clauses. To find out the number of clauses in a sentence you just need to count the number of finite verbs in that sentence.

A sentence that has two finite verbs has two clauses. In the same way, a sentence that has four finite verbs has four clauses.

Verbs can be finite or non-finite. Infinitives, participles and gerunds are non-finites. All other verbs are finites.

So, in the example given above the finite verbs are: was asked, lived, answered and was.

Now let us analyze that sentence:

    Whenever he was asked that question, the old man who lived in that house answered that the earth was flat.

Analysis of the complex sentence

1. The old man answered. (Main clause)

2. Whenever he was asked that question (Adverb clause of time modifying the verb answered.)

3. Who lived in that house (Adjective clause modifying the noun man.)

4. That the earth was flat (Noun clause which acts as the object of the main verb answered.)

Note that an adverb clause of time says when something happens. An adverb clause of place says where something happens. Adverbs usually express ideas such as time, place, manner, frequency etc.

A noun clause usually acts as the subject or object of the verb in another clause. In the example given above, the noun clause is the object of the verb in the main clause.

Sometimes a subordinate clause has another subordinate clause within it.

Now let’s analyze another sentence.

Before you start analyzing this sentence you have to find out the number of finite verbs in it.

There are three: think, pocketed and was lying.

You can find more information about finite and non-finite verbs on this page.

Analysis of the complex sentence

1. I think. (Main clause)

2. That he pocketed the mobile phone (Noun clause which acts as the object of the verb think.)

3. Which was lying on the table. (Adjective clause which modifies the noun mobile phone.)

Tenses
Tense rules — overview
The simple present tense
The present progressive tense
The present perfect tense
The present perfect progressive tense
Present tenses to talk about the future
The simple past tense
The past progressive tense
The past perfect tense
Correct use of the past perfect tense
The past perfect progressive tense
Past verb forms with present or future meaning
The simple future tense
The future progressive tense
The future perfect tense
Tenses in subordinate clauses

 

If you don’t find what you want here feel free to contact me.

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sentence analysis — это… Что такое sentence analysis?

  • Sentence completion tests — are a class of semi structured projective techniques. Sentence completion tests typically provide respondents with beginnings of sentences, referred to as “stems,” and respondents then complete the sentences in ways that are meaningful to them.… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — (from Greek ἀνάλυσις , a breaking up ) is the process of breaking a complex topic or substance into smaller parts to gain a better understanding of it. The technique has been applied in the study of mathematics and logic since before Aristotle,… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sentence Comprehension — Human language comprehension takes place whenever a reader or listener processes a language utterance, either in isolation or in the context of a conversation or a text. Many studies of the human language comprehension process have focused on… …   Wikipedia

  • Sentence diagram — X bar theory graph of the sentence He studies linguistics at the university. IP = Inflectional phrase. In pedagogy, a sentence diagram is a pictorial representation of the grammatical structure of a natural language sentence. A sentence diagram… …   Wikipedia

  • analysis — /euh nal euh sis/, n., pl. analyses / seez /. 1. the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a method of studying the nature of something or of determining its… …   Universalium

  • analysis — /əˈnæləsəs / (say uh naluhsuhs) noun (plural analyses /əˈnæləsiz/ (say uh naluhseez)) 1. separation of a whole, whether a material substance or any matter of thought, into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • quantitative analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Volumetric analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Miscue analysis — was originally developed by Ken Goodman for the purpose of understanding the reading process. It is a diagnostic tool that helps researchers/teachers gain insight into the reading process. The term miscue was initiated by Ken Goodman to describe… …   Wikipedia

  • Discourse analysis — Sociolinguistics Areas of study Accent · Dialect Discourse analysis Language v …   Wikipedia

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    How to Analyze a Sentence

    Analysis is the process of identifying subjects, predicates, direct and indirect objects and the various types of clauses and phrases.

    The student is taught to analyze by beginning with very simple sentences. A common mistake in American pedagogy is to teach too much too soon–especially where grammar is concerned. Grammar needs to be taught in baby steps so that the student can absorb one concept before being introduced to the next one.

    Thought for the Day: Most elementary and secondary English textbooks contain TOO MUCH STUFF.

    Begin instruction in Sentence Analysis with simple two word sentences. For example, Birds fly.

    On a piece of notebook paper have the student write two headings separated by a neatly drawn line:

    SUBJECT | PREDICATE

    The line is to be drawn all the way down the page to leave space for plenty of examples. A straight line, mind. Use a ruler.

    Examples of first sentences to analyze:

    Birds fly.
    Dogs bark.
    Children laugh.
    Adults work.
    Cats pounce.

    You get the idea.

    Explain that the Subject is what you’re talking about and that the Predicate is what is said about the Subject. With each example hammer it home with questions:

    Teacher: Who flies?
    Pupil: Birds.

    Teacher: So what is “birds”?
    Pupil: Subject!

    Teacher: What do the birds do?
    Pupil: Fly.

    Teacher: Right! That’s the Predicate because it’s what is said about the Subject.

    Do the same thing with each sentence, ring all the changes on the questions that you can think of, getting across the concept that Subject is what is being spoken of and Predicate is what is being said about the Subject.

    Once the learner has grasped the basic concept of Subject as topic and Predicate as what is said about the Subject, you can start adding words, but you continue to offer simple Subject/Predicate examples.

    Examples of second-stage sentences to analyze:

    The little birds sing.
    A strange dog barked.
    Two children sang.

    It is at this point that you teach the other part of the process: Parsing.

    That’s in the next post: How to Parse a Sentence

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    sentence analysis — это… Что такое sentence analysis?

  • Sentence completion tests — are a class of semi structured projective techniques. Sentence completion tests typically provide respondents with beginnings of sentences, referred to as “stems,” and respondents then complete the sentences in ways that are meaningful to them.… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — (from Greek ἀνάλυσις , a breaking up ) is the process of breaking a complex topic or substance into smaller parts to gain a better understanding of it. The technique has been applied in the study of mathematics and logic since before Aristotle,… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sentence Comprehension — Human language comprehension takes place whenever a reader or listener processes a language utterance, either in isolation or in the context of a conversation or a text. Many studies of the human language comprehension process have focused on… …   Wikipedia

  • Sentence diagram — X bar theory graph of the sentence He studies linguistics at the university. IP = Inflectional phrase. In pedagogy, a sentence diagram is a pictorial representation of the grammatical structure of a natural language sentence. A sentence diagram… …   Wikipedia

  • analysis — /euh nal euh sis/, n., pl. analyses / seez /. 1. the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a method of studying the nature of something or of determining its… …   Universalium

  • analysis — /əˈnæləsəs / (say uh naluhsuhs) noun (plural analyses /əˈnæləsiz/ (say uh naluhseez)) 1. separation of a whole, whether a material substance or any matter of thought, into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • quantitative analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Volumetric analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Miscue analysis — was originally developed by Ken Goodman for the purpose of understanding the reading process. It is a diagnostic tool that helps researchers/teachers gain insight into the reading process. The term miscue was initiated by Ken Goodman to describe… …   Wikipedia

  • Discourse analysis — Sociolinguistics Areas of study Accent · Dialect Discourse analysis Language v …   Wikipedia

  • top_english.academic.ru

    sentence analysis — это… Что такое sentence analysis?

  • Sentence completion tests — are a class of semi structured projective techniques. Sentence completion tests typically provide respondents with beginnings of sentences, referred to as “stems,” and respondents then complete the sentences in ways that are meaningful to them.… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — (from Greek ἀνάλυσις , a breaking up ) is the process of breaking a complex topic or substance into smaller parts to gain a better understanding of it. The technique has been applied in the study of mathematics and logic since before Aristotle,… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sentence Comprehension — Human language comprehension takes place whenever a reader or listener processes a language utterance, either in isolation or in the context of a conversation or a text. Many studies of the human language comprehension process have focused on… …   Wikipedia

  • Sentence diagram — X bar theory graph of the sentence He studies linguistics at the university. IP = Inflectional phrase. In pedagogy, a sentence diagram is a pictorial representation of the grammatical structure of a natural language sentence. A sentence diagram… …   Wikipedia

  • analysis — /euh nal euh sis/, n., pl. analyses / seez /. 1. the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a method of studying the nature of something or of determining its… …   Universalium

  • analysis — /əˈnæləsəs / (say uh naluhsuhs) noun (plural analyses /əˈnæləsiz/ (say uh naluhseez)) 1. separation of a whole, whether a material substance or any matter of thought, into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • quantitative analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Volumetric analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Miscue analysis — was originally developed by Ken Goodman for the purpose of understanding the reading process. It is a diagnostic tool that helps researchers/teachers gain insight into the reading process. The term miscue was initiated by Ken Goodman to describe… …   Wikipedia

  • Discourse analysis — Sociolinguistics Areas of study Accent · Dialect Discourse analysis Language v …   Wikipedia

  • dic.academic.ru

    sentence analysis — это… Что такое sentence analysis?

  • Sentence completion tests — are a class of semi structured projective techniques. Sentence completion tests typically provide respondents with beginnings of sentences, referred to as “stems,” and respondents then complete the sentences in ways that are meaningful to them.… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — (from Greek ἀνάλυσις , a breaking up ) is the process of breaking a complex topic or substance into smaller parts to gain a better understanding of it. The technique has been applied in the study of mathematics and logic since before Aristotle,… …   Wikipedia

  • Analysis — A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sentence Comprehension — Human language comprehension takes place whenever a reader or listener processes a language utterance, either in isolation or in the context of a conversation or a text. Many studies of the human language comprehension process have focused on… …   Wikipedia

  • Sentence diagram — X bar theory graph of the sentence He studies linguistics at the university. IP = Inflectional phrase. In pedagogy, a sentence diagram is a pictorial representation of the grammatical structure of a natural language sentence. A sentence diagram… …   Wikipedia

  • analysis — /euh nal euh sis/, n., pl. analyses / seez /. 1. the separating of any material or abstract entity into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a method of studying the nature of something or of determining its… …   Universalium

  • analysis — /əˈnæləsəs / (say uh naluhsuhs) noun (plural analyses /əˈnæləsiz/ (say uh naluhseez)) 1. separation of a whole, whether a material substance or any matter of thought, into its constituent elements (opposed to synthesis). 2. this process as a… …   Australian English dictionary

  • quantitative analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Volumetric analysis — Analysis A*nal y*sis, n.; pl. {Analyses}. [Gr. ?, fr. ? to unloose, to dissolve, to resolve into its elements; ? up + ? to loose. See {Loose}.] 1. A resolution of anything, whether an object of the senses or of the intellect, into its constituent …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Miscue analysis — was originally developed by Ken Goodman for the purpose of understanding the reading process. It is a diagnostic tool that helps researchers/teachers gain insight into the reading process. The term miscue was initiated by Ken Goodman to describe… …   Wikipedia

  • Discourse analysis — Sociolinguistics Areas of study Accent · Dialect Discourse analysis Language v …   Wikipedia

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