Lap harp tuning – How to Tune a Lap Harp » VripMaster

How to Tune a Lap Harp » VripMaster

The lap harp—a small string instrument in concert pitch that is popular with young children—can be a wonderful first instrument to learn. It’s also a favorite of experienced music students and musicians. But regular play, occasional use, and even a lack of play—which typically leads to dust buildup—can cause the pegs to gradually unwind and pull the whole instrument out of tune. Luckily, with a bit of musical knowledge and a lot of patience, the lap harp is fairly easy to tune.

Setting up Your Tuner


  1. Purchase a tuning key, electronic tuner, and guitar pick. Most lap harp kits and electronic tuners include a tuning key—a small «L»-shaped silver instrument with a hole that fits over the tuning pegs on the sides of the instrument. Tuners either clip to the body of the harp or are placed close to the harp to pick up its sound. After fitting the key onto a tuning peg, turning the handle changes the key of each string.

    • A pick is also recommended to make strumming and note quality easier and better.
  2. Set your tuner to 440 Hz if it’s not already. Electronic tuners are often set to this frequency by default. This is sometimes displayed on the tuner as «A = 440.» Setting to this frequency means that each of your notes will be the same frequency as other instruments in concert pitch—the common standard for musical instrument tuning.


  3. Place the harp on your lap with the narrow, pointed end facing forward. Position it so that are 15 silver pegs on the right of the harp and 15 red pegs on the left. You can also place your lap on a flat surface and tune it from there.

    • Sit in a position that is comfortable enough to maintain for a good 15 to 20 minutes.

  4. Clip your electronic tuner onto the harp’s wooden body. Most electronic tuners clip onto the body of the harp’s wood. Attach it close to the notes that you’re tuning and move it accordingly. After clipping it on, turn on the tuner’s power and pluck a couple of strings to make sure it’s picking up sound signals.

    • If you’re starting with the G string at the bottom right of the harp, clip it to the bottom right to start and move it along the edge as you continue tuning.

Tuning Your Strings


  1. Strum each string and observe the note on the tuner. Make sure that the display shows the note that the string is playing and a needle that moves to the left or right of its meter display. The screen will also typically display yellow when the note is too low, and red when it’s too high. The combination of colors helps you guide your tuning until the needle stabilizes into the center of the display with the desired note above it.

    • To tune to G, the notes—from bottom right to top right when the narrow end is facing upward—should be: G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G. Alternative tunings are different, but stick to G standard tuning until you get more experience.
    • Many lap harps come with a sheet with all the notes marked, as well as tuning instructions. Be sure to have something of this sort (or write down the notes above on a paper) so that you have a reference for what notes each string needs to be tuned to.

  2. Note how many half or whole steps the string is away from the intended note. For example, G♯ (G-sharp) is a half step up from G, and G♭(G-flat) is a half step down from it. Most lap harps are tuned to the key of C or G and only play «natural» notes (no flats or sharps).

    • If you’re an experienced musician, don’t be afraid to play around with some of the strings to turn a note or two flat or sharp.

  3. Tighten each flat string by slowly turning the tuning key clockwise. If the note is too low—for example, the first string is A instead of G—you need to tighten the string a full step. Hook the tuning key onto the silver knob, strum the note clearly until it shows up on the tuner, and then slowly tighten the string with your tuning key by turning it counterclockwise.

    • As the note is fading away, you’ll hear the pitch begin to change. Use this as a guide as to how much you’ve changed the sound, and if you’re going higher or lower.
    • Keep an eye on the tuner screen and stop tightening the string when the tuning needle centers.

  4. Loosen each sharp string by turning the tuning key counterclockwise. If a note has gone sharp—for example, the bottom-right string is A instead of G—hook the tuning key onto the string’s peg, strum the note clearly, and gently turn it counterclockwise. Stop loosening the string once the tuner reads G.

    • Watch the screen carefully and stop turning the key once the tuner displays the correct note.
    • Keep an eye on the tuner screen and stop tightening the string when the tuning needle centers.

  5. Continue this process with all the strings until they’re tuned. Tuning can be slow and tedious work, so take plenty of breaks. If you come across a particularly difficult string, come back to it later.

    • Check your progress periodically by playing up and down through the strings you’ve tuned. Make any adjustments as you go along.

Tips

  • Keep in mind that some of the changes you make will be so small that you may not even have to feel the movement of the key (in fact, if you do, you may have gone too far). Some adjustments are very minuscule – be careful not to turn the key so much that it goes out of tune.
  • Most instrument repair shops will be able to tune a lap harp. If you’re having trouble, consider having it professionally tuned.
  • You can also tune by ear, using a piano or a note playback feature on your tuner. However, especially when using the piano, you’ll have to be sure that the piano is perfectly in tune, or the harp will be out of tune, too. Generally, tuning with the needle on a tuner is more accurate and easier to work with.

Warnings

  • Don’t let young children try this unsupervised. It’s very likely that they’ll over-tighten and break a string, which can be dangerous and present a choking hazard.
  • Do not over-tighten the strings! It’s very easy to break strings on a lap harp, and it can be a real pain to buy replacement strings.

Things You’ll Need

  • Lap harp
  • Electronic tuner
  • Tuning key
  • Pick
  • Note sheet (included in some harp starter kits)

vripmaster.com

How to Tune a Lap Harp

When And How /
News /
Harp, Tune /

The lap harp—a small string instrument in concert pitch that is popular with young children—can be a wonderful first instrument to learn. It’s also a favorite of experienced music students and musicians. But regular play, occasional use, and even a lack of play—which typically leads to dust buildup—can cause the pegs to gradually unwind and pull the whole instrument out of tune. Luckily, with a bit of musical knowledge and a lot of patience, the lap harp is fairly easy to tune.

EditSteps

EditSetting up Your Tuner

  1. Purchase a tuning key, electronic tuner, and guitar pick. Most lap harp kits and electronic tuners include a tuning key—a small “L”-shaped silver instrument with a hole that fits over the tuning pegs on the sides of the instrument. Tuners either clip to the body of the harp or are placed close to the harp to pick up its sound. After fitting the key onto a tuning peg, turning the handle changes the key of each string.[1]
    • A pick is also recommended to make strumming and note quality easier and better.
  2. Set your tuner to 440 Hz if it’s not already. Electronic tuners are often set to this frequency by default. This is sometimes displayed on the tuner as “A = 440.” Setting to this frequency means that each of your notes will be the same frequency as other instruments in concert pitch—the common standard for musical instrument tuning.[2]
  3. Place the harp on your lap with the narrow, pointed end facing forward. Position it so that are 15 silver pegs on the right of the harp and 15 red pegs on the left. You can also place your lap on a flat surface and tune it from there.

    • Sit in a position that is comfortable enough to maintain for a good 15 to 20 minutes.
  4. Clip your electronic tuner onto the harp’s wooden body. Most electronic tuners clip onto the body of the harp’s wood. Attach it close to the notes that you’re tuning and move it accordingly. After clipping it on, turn on the tuner’s power and pluck a couple of strings to make sure it’s picking up sound signals.[3]
    • If you’re starting with the G string at the bottom right of the harp, clip it to the bottom right to start and move it along the edge as you continue tuning.

EditTuning Your Strings

  1. Strum each string and observe the note on the tuner. Make sure that the display shows the note that the string is playing and a needle that moves to the left or right of its meter display. The screen will also typically display yellow when the note is too low, and red when it’s too high. The combination of colors helps you guide your tuning until the needle stabilizes into the center of the display with the desired note above it.[4]
    • To tune to G, the notes—from bottom right to top right when the narrow end is facing upward—should be: G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G. Alternative tunings are different, but stick to G standard tuning until you get more experience.[5]
    • Many lap harps come with a sheet with all the notes marked, as well as tuning instructions. Be sure to have something of this sort (or write down the notes above on a paper) so that you have a reference for what notes each string needs to be tuned to.
  2. Note how many half or whole steps the string is away from the intended note. For example, G♯ (G-sharp) is a half step up from G, and G♭(G-flat) is a half step down from it. Most lap harps are tuned to the key of C or G and only play “natural” notes (no flats or sharps).

    • If you’re an experienced musician, don’t be afraid to play around with some of the strings to turn a note or two flat or sharp.
  3. Tighten each flat string by slowly turning the tuning key clockwise. If the note is too low—for example, the first string is A instead of G—you need to tighten the string a full step. Hook the tuning key onto the silver knob, strum the note clearly until it shows up on the tuner, and then slowly tighten the string with your tuning key by turning it counterclockwise.[6]
    • As the note is fading away, you’ll hear the pitch begin to change. Use this as a guide as to how much you’ve changed the sound, and if you’re going higher or lower.
    • Keep an eye on the tuner screen and stop tightening the string when the tuning needle centers.
  4. Loosen each sharp string by turning the tuning key counterclockwise. If a note has gone sharp—for example, the bottom-right string is A instead of G—hook the tuning key onto the string’s peg, strum the note clearly, and gently turn it counterclockwise. Stop loosening the string once the tuner reads G.

    • Watch the screen carefully and stop turning the key once the tuner displays the correct note.
    • Keep an eye on the tuner screen and stop tightening the string when the tuning needle centers.
  5. Continue this process with all the strings until they’re tuned. Tuning can be slow and tedious work, so take plenty of breaks. If you come across a particularly difficult string, come back to it later.[7]
    • Check your progress periodically by playing up and down through the strings you’ve tuned. Make any adjustments as you go along.

EditThings You’ll Need

  • Lap harp
  • Electronic tuner
  • Tuning key
  • Pick
  • Note sheet (included in some harp starter kits)

EditTips

  • Keep in mind that some of the changes you make will be so small that you may not even have to feel the movement of the key (in fact, if you do, you may have gone too far). Some adjustments are very minuscule – be careful not to turn the key so much that it goes out of tune.
  • Most instrument repair shops will be able to tune a lap harp. If you’re having trouble, consider having it professionally tuned.
  • You can also tune by ear, using a piano or a note playback feature on your tuner. However, especially when using the piano, you’ll have to be sure that the piano is perfectly in tune, or the harp will be out of tune, too. Generally, tuning with the needle on a tuner is more accurate and easier to work with.

EditWarnings

  • Don’t let young children try this unsupervised. It’s very likely that they’ll over-tighten and break a string, which can be dangerous and present a choking hazard.
  • Do not over-tighten the strings! It’s very easy to break strings on a lap harp, and it can be a real pain to buy replacement strings.

EditRelated wikiHows

  • Play the Harp
  • Tune a Guitar
  • Tune a Guitar to Drop D

EditSources and Citations

__
Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found

How to of the Day

Commenti

commenti

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.

www.whenandhow.com

How to Tune a Lap Harp


The harp is a lovely instrument. The fact that the tuning is fixed
makes it easier to play than other stringed instruments where pitch is
determined by finger placement. But that can also be a problem. When
the strings are out of tune, you cannot adjust as you play. Therefore,
it is important to have the harp carefully tuned before you
start.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Harp
Tuning key
Electric tuner (optional)
class=»error»>Start with a string in the middle of the harp. Fit the
tuning key over the tuning peg opposite the string.
Turn the key
slowly clockwise to tighten the string and raise the pitch.
Turn
the key counter-clockwise to

The lap harp has 15 to 22 strings and is commonly used as
accompaniment in folk and classical music. Tuning a lap harp can be a
time-consuming procedure. The standard lap harp has 15 strings, and
the tuning keys are very delicate. The smallest nudge can cause the
harp to go out of tune. Though there are virtually unlimited ways to
tune the lap harp, its most common tuning is in the key of
G.Difficulty:Moderately ChallengingInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Electric tuner
Tuning key

Place the lap
harp in your lap and position an electric tuner about 2 feet out in
front of you.
Turn on the tuner and pluck a few strings on the harp
to make sure the tuner is pic

Arts & Entertainment

The lap harp is a multi-stringed instrument that belongs to the harp
family of instruments. One major feature that distinguishes it is that
you play it on your lap, hence the origin of its name. There are two
ways of creating flats notes on a lap harp. One method involves tuning
the instrument to include flats rather than merely diatonic notes. The
other method involves utilizing sharping
levers.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll Need
Tuning
wrench
Electronic tuner
Sharping levers
class=»error»>Tuning MethodIsolate a string on the harp that has the
same name as the note that you need to flatten. For instance, if you
want to play Bb notes in a song, find the B

Arts & Entertainment

Stringed instruments, such as lap harps, create their sound from the
plucking of strings. The strings of a lap harp are organized in
varying lengths and widths to make different pitches. You can create
your own lap harp instrument out of simple materials that can be
purchased at any department and music store. Once finished, you can
tune the harp so that you can play melodic and harmonic songs on
it.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Picture frame
16 nails
Hammer
8 guitar strings, low
E, F, G, A, B, C, D, high E
Needle-nose pliers
Wire
cutters
Digital tuner

Take the backing and the
glass off the picture frame; discard the

Arts & Entertainment

The harp family is divided into two main groups: pedal harp and
non-pedal harps. Pedal harps are large, heavy and impossible to hold
on your lap. There are also many sizes of non-pedal harps, which range
from 60 inches down to 23 inches in height. Lap harps are the
smallest. They are lightweight, portable and, yes, held on the lap
while played. The Smallest Lap HarpsThe Wee Bonnie, by Stoney
EndThe smallest lap harps are less than 2 feet high and weigh only 5
lbs. They have 16 strings that provide a range of 2 octaves.
Larger
Lap HarpsBlevin’s Melody 26Most lap harps are somewhat larger, ranging
from 32 to 36 inches. The average string count is 25, giving a range
of more than 3 octaves

Arts & Entertainment

The lap harp is a small, portable harp that is — yes — held on the
lap when played. Unlike large pedal harps, which are more than 80
pounds, the lap harp generally weighs less than 15 pounds. Learning to
play the harp takes time and effort, but the rewards are more than
worth the investment.Difficulty:Moderately ChallengingInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Lap harp

Playing the Lap
HarpHold the harp on your lap, resting the base on your
thighs.
Lean the harp back against your right shoulder. Be careful
that the base doesn’t slip outward, off your lap. Many harp stores
sell lap harp frames or slings to prevent slippage.
Proper hand
positionPlace the thumb an

Arts & Entertainment

Lap harps are stringed instruments available in a couple of different
varieties. Psaltery lap harps are small, highly portable instruments
that rest flat on your lap. These instruments will be appealing to
children, or adults who don’t have a strong musical background. Celtic
lap harps, also known as folk harps, are smaller versions of
traditional harps. These instruments are more portable than
full-sized harps, and will require a higher level of musicianship in
order to play proficiently. Psaltery Lap HarpThe lap harp, or
psaltery lap harp, is a very simple instrument to play. It features 15
strings, and is typically tuned to a single key. The lap harp is
generally played with only on

Arts & Entertainment

A lap harp is a Celtic instrument resembling a full-sized orchestral
harp, but sized to be held on a sitting player’s knees. Like all
stringed instruments, the strings of a lap harp will periodically
break and need to be replaced. In some cases, you can repair a broken
string, but the process for restringing is similar either way. You can
restring your harp in your own home.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions
Things You’ll Need
New harp string of same size as broken string
(see Step 1)

Determine if the string can be
repaired or needs to be replaced. You cannot tie or glue a string
back together at the middle because anything strong enough to hold it
together will i

Arts & Entertainment

bighow.org

How to Tune a Lap Harp

Source: wikiHow

Edit Article

The lap harp—a small string instrument in concert pitch that is popular with young children—can be a wonderful first instrument to learn. It’s also a favorite of experienced music students and musicians. But regular play, occasional use, and even a lack of play—which typically leads to dust buildup—can cause the pegs to gradually unwind and pull the whole instrument out of tune. Luckily, with a bit of musical knowledge and a lot of patience, the lap harp is fairly easy to tune.

  1. 1 Purchase a tuning key, electronic tuner, and guitar pick. Most lap harp kits and electronic tuners include a tuning key—a small “L”-shaped silver instrument with a hole that fits over the tuning pegs on the sides of the instrument. Tuners either clip to the body of the harp or are placed close to the harp to pick up its sound. After fitting the key onto a tuning peg, turning the handle changes the key of each string.[1]

Click here to read more

Sasha Harriet

As content editor, I get to do what I love everyday. Tweet, share and promote the best content our tools find on a daily basis.

I have a crazy passion for #music, #celebrity #news & #fashion! I’m always out and about on Twitter.

Latest posts by Sasha Harriet (see all)

More from Around the Web

feedbox.com

Отправить ответ

avatar
  Подписаться  
Уведомление о