How to say hello in vietnamese – Greeting — Learn how to say hello in Vietnamese

Greeting — Learn how to say hello in Vietnamese

To say Hello and Goodbye in Vietnamese is very easy. We can study one word for all: “Chào”. But belong to your position, you need learn to know how to use right way in each situation.

Say hello in Vietnamese: XIN CHÀO!

When Vietnamese people meet each other, they use “chào” or “xin chào” which standing before a relevant personal pronoun. However, “chào” or “xin chào” can only be used in an informal case, for example with close friends. If they want to show their respect, they use “Kính chào”. They do not distinguish between morning, afternoon or evening in greetings.

 

Examples:  
Chào

Xin chào

Kính chào

Bạn/cậu

ông

thầy

 

    • Chào bạn! (to say hello a friend, common case)
    • Chào ông! (to formally greet a married man)
    • Xin chào bà! (to greet a married woman)
    • Kính chào thầy! (to greet a male teacher)

 

Note: When they know each other, they use “Chào” in front of a relevant title and name.
Let’s say Hello in Vietnamese with me: Xin chào bạn! (or Chào bạn)

 

Other examples: Say hello in Vietnamese with other way: Chào + Personal pronoun + name
      • Chào ông Minh! (to greet Mr. Minh)
      • Chào bà Hà! (to greet Mrs. Hà)

One thing very special, “chào” in Vietnam means “hello” or “goodbye”; therefore, the above examples also mean “Goodbye Mr. Minh” and “Goodbye Mrs. Hà”).

 

Chào ông Ba = Hello Mr. Ba

But Chào ông Ba = Goodbye Mr. Ba.

It means:

When you meet people, you say Hello (Chào or xin chào)

When you must say Goodbye, you also can use Chào or Tạm biệt (Bye).

“Không” – Yes-no question in Vietnamese
There are many question words available to form questions in Vietnamese but the most basic one is “không” which is used after a statement to form a “yes-no” question. “Không” is a negative particle used in answering the questions. It stands before a verb or an adjective.

 

Examples:

      • Statement:  – Bà khỏe.              (You are well)
      • Question:    – Bà khỏe không? (How are you?)
      • Answer:       – Dạ, khỏe.             (Yes, I am well)

– Dạ, không khỏe. (No, I am not well)

Related

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[Audio] Hi & Hello in Vietnamese. How to say Hello in Vietnamese?

Hi everyone! It’s very long time from my last article. I was very busy with my job, my trips and my family. But now I’m back (with better English, I guess) and going to make a series of how-to-say articles, that guides how to say simple words and phrases in Vietnamese, such as Hello, Thank you, How are you, Please, Yes or No,… I think these are very important words to communicate when you visit Vietnam. So to begin, this article I will teach how to say Hello in Vietnamese. Let’s get started!

How do you say Hello or Hi in Vietnamese?

In Vietnam, there’s no difference between Hello and Hi. Both mean “Xin Chào”:

http://www.vietnamtriptips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/xin-chao-fast.mp3

Again and slower:

http://www.vietnamtriptips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/xin-chao-slow.mp3

The word “xin chào” can be used in any time of day. Vietnamese people basically don’t use the words like morning, afternoon, evening in greeting. In most cases, we only use the word “xin chào” for both formal and informal situations.

Advanced “hello” (if you want to know)

Saying “hello” in Vietnamese seems to be very easy, isn’t it? Yes, if you’re a foreigner and just visting Vietnam for few weeks. But if you learn our culture deeper (to work in Vietnam, or marry a Vietnamese girl for example), you will see greeting in Vietnamese is very complicated and it can make you crazy. Saying “xin chào” to everyone, especially to someone many years older than you, could be very disrespectful.

In Vietnamese culture, age between two people is very very important in communicating, and it’s also decide how do you say Hello. Here are some cases:

– Chào anh: use for greeting a man several years older

http://www.vietnamtriptips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/chao-anh.mp3

– Chào chị: greeting a woman several years older

http://www.vietnamtriptips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/chao-chi.mp3

– Chào em: greeting a man or woman several years younger

http://www.vietnamtriptips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/chao-em.mp3

– Chào chú: greeting a man many years older than you, but younger than your father or mother

– Chào cô: greeting a woman many years older than you, but younger than your father or mother

http://www.vietnamtriptips.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/chao-co.mp3

– Chào bác: greeting a man or woman many years older than you, and also older than your father and mother

Of course you can’t ask “how old are you” to everyone you talk with, so you have to look at their face and guess the age. Did these make you crazy? But that’s not all, there are many other cases (about 10) if you learn deeper.

When you want to marry a Vietnamese, everything will be much “interesting”, there are many other cases. Sometime, you have to say “chào anh” or “chào chị” even when he or she is much younger. Or sometime, you have say “chào chú” even when he is younger than you, and he’s also not your father’s brother, no one can have enough patience to explain why you have to say that. Greeting when you’re a member of Vietnamese family is very difficult, even with me, it’s not easy too. I had to take many time to learn, but still can’t remember all.

This may seem funny to you, a foreigner, and sometime, I also wish greeting in Vietnam is only “hello” and “hi”. But anyway, it’s my culture, and I love it.

Conclusion

Greeting in Vietnamese may be very complicated, but you don’t need to worry. No one will be angry with you, a foreigner who’s trying to say “hello” in their language, even that person is older than your grandparent. So just feel free to say “xin chào” to everyone!

[Audio] Hi & Hello in Vietnamese. How to say Hello in Vietnamese?

5 (100%) 4 votes


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Say Hello and Goodbye in Vietnamese

Saying Hello/Hi

In a nutshell, the following is the formula to say hi/hello in Vietnamese: 

To say hello/hi in Vietnamese:
Chào + [The correct word to address that person]

The following table shows some common cases:

if you’re more or less at the same age or you’re especially close.chào bạn
OR
chào + [The person’s name]
if the person is older than you and is malechào anh
if the person is older, and is femalechào chị
if the person is younger (for both male and female)chào em

So if your friend’s (first) name is Hảo, you would say Chào Hảo. If she’s older and called Thảo, you would say Chào chị Thảo. It’s worth noting that we can also omit the name: so we could have just said Chào chị.

There is one noticeable difference in the use of proper name and family name between English and Vietnamese. In English, if you’re being formal, you would probably address the other person using their family name: Hi Jim but Dear Rohn. In Vietnamese, we would always use firstname, in every situation. The formality is encoded by the different way you address, and never in the change from first name to family name. Try a small experiment by calling your Vietnamese friend by his family name, and the person would probably think you’re talking to someone else, if there are many around, or you have forgot his/her name!

In Vietnamese,
always Refer to people by their firstname, including formal situations.

If the other person is someone older and very much admired/respected, such as your old teachers, consider adding a Xin before the word Chào to make it more formal: Xin Chào anh/chị.

By now, you probably have realized that the age factor plays a significant role in addressing people in Vietnamese (and in many other languages such as Chinese, French, Japanese as well). While in English, we’d always use «you» regardless of age, it’s considered very inappropriate not to address people according to age, even if you’re the boss and the other person is your subordinate! This is not about authority, it’s culture.

And if you did wonder why in the table above there are the quite a number of ‘…’s. It’s because there are many different ways to refer to someone who is male and older than you. And there are many other cases we didn’t mention, such as someone who is significantly older/younger than you. Don’t worry, there will be another discussion dedicated to this subject that would clear all your doubts!

Saying Good morning, afternoon, etc.

Below are the equivalents in Vietnamese.

Goodmorning
Chàobuổi sáng
 
Goodafternoon
Chàobuổi chiều
 
Goodevening
Chàobuổi tối

There is one good news: you don’t need to learn the above table! The reason? In Vietnam, it’s somehow not so popular to address using ‘good morning’ and the likes. Maybe it’s due to the pragmatics aspect of language: Chào buổi sáng is 3 times longer than just Chào, which already does a good job. What’s your guess?

Saying Goodbye

The translation of goodbye is tạm biệt so that the equivalent of Goodbye Huy is Tạm biệt Huy. The usage of tạm biệt is exactly the same as that of chào. If you are young (at age or at heart) and the other person is likewise, it’s hip to use Bye as in Bye Huy. But whenever you every suspect the other person is being formal, please don’t use it.
 

Summary

  • To say hello: (Xin) Chào + bạn/< Proper Name >/anh/chị
  • It’s usually uncommon to say the equivalents of Good morning in normal situations.
  • To say goodbye: Tạm biệt + bạn/< Proper name >/anh/chị.

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Vietnamese University — Learn Vietnamese online

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To say Hello and Goodbye in Vietnamese is very easy. We can study one word for all: “Chào”. But belong to your position, you need learn to know how to use right way in each situation. When Vietnamese people meet each other, they use “chào”… Read More


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How to Say Hello in 100 Languages

A greeting is often the first point of call for human communication, and should be the first phrase you learn from any foreign language. Opening a conversation with a greeting is polite and shows willingness to communicate. Don’t be nervous about saying hello as the effort will usually be appreciated even if you don’t get it quite right! Reading how to greet others in many languages is both rewarding and fun, so here’s a handy list of how to say hello in 100 languages, along with the phonetic pronunciation.

Hello in 100 languages, sorted by continent in alphabetical order.

Africa

Spread over at least six major language families, Africa’s language diversity is incomparable to the rest of the world and includes huge tonal diversity, and even the use of clicks and unique mouth movements to help articulate phrases in certain contexts. Saying ‘Hello’ at least, is fortunately often easy to pronounce!

Afrikaans

  • hallo (hah-loh) — hello

Amharic

  • tena jistilign (teh-nah yihst-ihl-ihgn) — hello (formal)
  • selam (sae-lahm) — hello (informal)

Chichewa

  • moni (moh-nee) / muli bwanji (moo-lee bwahn-jee) — hello

Hausa

  • salama alaikum (sah-lahm-ah ah-lai-koom) — hello (formal)
  • sannu (sahn-noo) — hello (informal)

Igbo

  • ndêwó (in-deh-woh) — hello (formal)
  • kèdú (keh-doh) — hello (informal)

Kinyarwanda

  • muraho (moo-rah-hoh) — hello
  • bite (bee-teh) — hello (informal)

Lingala

  • mbote (mboh-teh) — hello

Luganda

  • ki kati (kee kah-tee) — hello (informal)

Malagasy

  • manao ahoana (man-ow ah-ohn-ah) / salama (sah-lAHm-ah) / akory (ah-kOO-ree)
  • miarahaba (mee-arah-hah-bah) — hello

Ndebele

  • salibonani (sah-lee-boh-nah-nee) — hello

Northern Sotho

  • dumêlang (doo-meh-lang) — hello

Oromo

  • ashamaa (ah-shah-maa) — hello
  • attam (aht-tahm) — hello (informal)

Sesotho

  • dumela (doo-meh-lah) — hello

Shona

  • mhoro (mhoh-roh) — hello (singular)
  • mhoroi (mhoh-roh-ee) — hello (plural)

Swahili

  • jambo (jahm-boh) — hello
  • hujambo (hoo-jahm-boh) — hello

Swati

  • sawubona (sah-woo-boh-nah) — hello

Tigrinya

  • selam (seh-lahm) — hello

Tsonga

  • avuxeni (ah-voo-sheh-nee) — hello (greeting)
  • ahee (ah-hee) — hello (response)

Tswana

  • dumela (doo-meh-lah) — hello

Wolof

  • salaam aleekum (sah-laam ah-ley-koom) — hello

Xhosa

Yoruba

Zulu

  • sawubona (sah-woo-boh-nah) — hello

 

Asia

Aside from Turkic languages of Central Asia and some Asian languages that were influenced by European colonization, most Asian languages are astoundingly unique and diverse, and there’s less common ground shared with other major language families.

Thai, Lao, Cambodian, Vietnamese, Cantonese, Japanese and Chinese are tonally varied languages, meaning as you speak, pitch changes dramatically alter the meaning of words and phrases. By observing native speakers, you can hear how certain phrases, including greetings, are articulated in their native natural ways.

Armenian

  • barev dzez (bah-REV DZEZ) — hello
  • barev (bah-REV) — hello (informal)

Azerbaijani

  • salam (sah-lam) — hello

Bengali

  • nômoshkar (naw-mo-shkar) — hello (for Hindus)
  • assalamualaikum (ahs-sah-lahmoo-ah-lay-koom) / salam (sah-lahm) — hello (for Muslims)

Burmese

  • mingalarba (min-ga-la-ba) — hello

Cambodian

  • chum reap suor (*) — hello (formal)
  • sous-dey (*) — hello (informal)

Cantonese

Chinese

  • nǐ hǎo (nee how) — hello

Dzongkha

  • kuzu-zangpo (koo-zoo-zang-poh) — hello

Georgian

  • gamarjoba (gah-mahr-joh-bah) — hello

Gujarati

  • namaste (nah-mah-steh) — hello
  • kem cho (kem-choh) — hello (lit. How are you?)

Hindi

  • namaste (nah-mah-steh) — hello

Indonesian

Japanese

  • konnichiwa (kohn-nee-chee-wah) — good afternoon / hello

Kannada

  • namaste (nah-mah-steh) / namaskāra (nah-mah-skah-rah) — hello

Kazakh

  • sälemetsiz be? (sah-lem-met-siz beh) — hello (formal)
  • sälem (sah-lem) — hello (informal)

Korean

  • annyeonghaseyo (an-nyee-ong-hah-seh-yo) — hello (formal)
  • annyeong (ah-nyee-ong) — hello (informal)

Kyrgyz

  • salamatsyzby (sah-lam-aht-seez-bee) — hello (formal)
  • salam (sah-lam) — hello (informal)

Lao

  • sabaidee (sah-bai-dee) — hello

Malay

  • selamat pagi (se-lah-maht pah-gee) — good morning
  • selamat petang  (se-lah-maht pe-tahng) — good afternoon
  • selamat malam (se-lah-maht mah-lahm) — good night
  • hello (he-loh) — hello
  • hai (hai) — hello (informal)

Malayalam

  • namaskaram (nah-mah-skahr-ahm) — hello (formal)
  • aay (ah-yeh) — hello (informal)

Mongolian

  • sain baina uu (sain bai-na OO) — hello

Nepali

  • namaste (nah-mahs-teh) — hello

Pashto

  • salaam (sah-lahm) — hello
  • khe chare (KHEH chah-reh) — hello (informal)

Punjabi

  • sat sri akal ji (saht sree ah-kahl jee) — hello (formal, Sikh)
  • asalamwalaykum (ah-sah-lahm-wah-lay-koom) — hello (formal, Muslim)
  • sat sri akal (saht sree ah-kahl) — hello (informal, Sikh)
  • salaam (sah-laam) — hello (informal, Muslim)

Sinhala

  • āyubōvan (ah-yuh-boh-van) — hello (formal)
  • halō (ha-loh) — hello (informal)

Tagalog

  • kumusta? (koo-moos-ta) — hello
  • helów (hey-LOW) — hello (informal)

Taiwanese Hokkien

  • lí-hó (lee-hoh) — hello

Tamil

  • vaṇakkam (vah-nahk-kahm) — hello

Tatar

  • isänmesez (ees-aen-meh-sehz) / sawmısız (saw-mis-siz) — hello
  • sälam (sae-lahm) — hello (informal)

Telugu

  • namaskārām (nah-mahs-kaar-am) — hello

Thai

  • sà-wàt-dee (*) — hello

Tibetan

  • tashi delek (tah-shee del-ek) — hello

Urdu

  • āssālam ‘alaykum (ahs-sah-lahm ah-lay-koom) — hello (greeting)
  • wālaikum assalām (wah-lay-koom ahs-sah-lahm) — hello (response)
  • salām (sah-lam) — hello (informal)

Uyghur

  • ässalamu läykum (aes-sah-lahm-oo lae-koom)  — hello (greeting)
  • wä’äläykum ässalam (wae-aelae-koom aes-sah-lahm) — hello (response)
  • yahshimusiz (yah-shih-moo-sihz) — hello (informal)

Uzbek

  • assalomu aleykum (ahs-sah-lo-moo ah-lay-koom) — hello (formal)
  • salom (sah-lom) — hello (informal)

Vietnamese

  • xin chào (sin chow) — hello

 

Europe

Romance, Germanic and Slavic languages are the three major Indo-European language families and there is a lot of overlapping vocabulary and word formation. Through the Latin and Greek formations and derivations of many words and phrases, you will see many similarities between the European greetings in this list.

Albanian

  • tungjatjeta (toon-jah-TYEH-tah) — hello (formal)
  • tjeta (TYEH-tah) — hello (informal)

Basque

  • kaixo (kai-sho) — hello

Belarusian

  • vitaju (vee-TAH-you) — hello

Breton

  • demat (de-mat) — hello / good day

Bulgarian

  • zdravejte (zdrah-VEY-teh) — hello (formal)
  • zdravej (zdrah-VEY) — hello (informal)

Bosnian

  • dobar dan (DOH-bahr dahn) — good day
  • zdravo (ZDRAH-voh) / merhaba (MEHR-hah-bah) — hello (informal)

Catalan

Croatian

Czech

  • dobrý den (DOH-bree dehn) — good day
  • ahoj (ahoy) — hello

Danish

  • hallo (ha-loh) — hello
  • hej (hai) — hi/hey

Dutch

  • hallo (HAH-low) — hello

Estonian

  • tere (TEHR-reh) — hello

Finnish

  • hyvää päivää (HOO-vah PAI-vah) — good day
  • terve (TEHR-veh) — hello
  • moi (moy) / hei (hay) — hey

French

  • bonjour (bohn-ZHOOR) — hello / good day
  • salut (sah-LOO) — hello (informal)

Frisian

Irish

  • dia duit (DEE-ah GHWIT) — hello

Gaelic

German

  • guten tag (goo-ten tahk) — good day / hello
  • hallo (ha-loh) — hello (informal)

Greek

  • yasass (YAH sahss) — hello (formal)
  • yassou (YAH soo) — hello (informal)

Hungarian

  • szervusz (SEHR-voos) — hello
  • szia (SEE-ah) — hello (informal)

Icelandic

  • góðan dag (goh-than da-yin) — good day
  • halló (ha-loh) — hello
  • (hai) — hi

Italian

  • buon giorno (bwohn JOHR-noh) — good day/hello
  • salve (SAHL-veh) — hello (formal)
  • ciào (chow) — hello (informal)

Latvian

  • sveika (SVEH-kah) — hello (to a male)
  • sveiks (SVEH-eeks) — hello (to a female)

Lithuanian

  • labas (LAH-bahs) — hi
  • sveikas (SVAY-kahs) — hello (to a male)
  • sveika (svay-KAH) — hello (to a female)
  • sveiki (svay-KEE) — hello (plural)

Luxembourgish

  • moïen (moy-en) — hello

Norwegian

  • god dag (goo dahg) — hello
  • hei (hay) — hi

Polish

  • dzień dobry (jeen doh-bree) — good day / hello
  • cześć (cheshch)— hello

Portuguese

Romanian

  • salut (sah-LOOT) — hello

Russian

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How to Say «Hello» in 100+ Languages

Lao

sabaidee

sa-bai-dee

 

Latin (Classical)

salve

sal-way

when talking to one person

 

salvete

sal-way-tay

when talking to more than one person

Latvian

labdien

 

 

 

sveiki

 

 

 

chau

chow

informal

Lingala

mbote

 

 

Lithuanian

laba diena

 

formal

 

labas

 

 

 

sveikas

 

informal; when speaking to a male

 

sveika

 

informal; when speaking to a female

Local Hawaiian Pidgin

sup braddah

 

 

Luxembourgish

moïen

MOY-en

 

Malayalam

namaskkaram

 

 

Maltese

merħba

 

«welcome»

 

bonġu

 

morning

 

bonswa

 

evening

 

il-lejl it-tajjeb

 

evening

Maori

kia ora

 

 

Marathi

namaskar

 

 

Mongolia

sain baina uu?

saa-yen baya-nu

formal

 

sain uu?

say-noo

informal

Nahuatl

niltze

 

 

 

hao

 

 

Navajo

ya’at’eeh

 

 

Nepali

namaskar

 

 

 

namaste

 

 

 

k cha

 

informal

 

kasto cha

 

 

Northern German

moin moin

 

 

Northern Shoto

dumelang

 

 

Norwegian

hei

 

hi

 

hallo

 

hello

 

heisann

 

hi there

 

halloisen

 

very informal

Oshikwanyama

wa uhala po, meme?

 

to a female; response is «ee»

 

wa uhala po, tate?

 

to a male; response is «ee»

 

nawa tuu?

 

formal; response is «ee»

Persian

salaam

 

As in other Islamic societies, an abbreviation for «as-salaam-o-aleykum.» «Do-rood,» also, means «hello.»

Polish

dzień dobry

 

formal

 

witaj

 

hello

 

cześć

 

hi

Portuguese

oi

 

informal

 

boas

 

informal

 

olá

 

informal

 

alô

 

informal

 

bom dia

 

good morning

 

boa tarde

 

good afternoon

 

boa noite

 

good evening

Rajasthani (Marwari)

Ram Ram

 

 

Romanian

salut

 

 

 

buna dimineata

 

formal: morning

 

buna ziua

 

formal: daytime

 

buna seara

 

formal: evening

Russian

privet

pree-VYET

informal

 

zdravstvuyte

ZDRA-stvooy-tyeh

formal

Samoan

talofa

 

formal

 

malo

 

(informal)

Scanian

haja

 

universal

 

hallå

 

informal

 

go’da

 

formal

 

go’maren

 

morning

 

go’aften

 

evening

Senegal

salamaleikum

 

 

Serbian

zdravo

 

informal

 

dobro jutro

dobro yutro

morning

 

dobar dan

 

afternoon

Sinhala

a`yubowan

ar-yu-bo-wan

meaning «long live»

Slovak

dobrý deň

 

formal

 

ahoj

ahoy

 

 

čau

chow

 

 

dobrý

 

informal abbreviation

Slovenian

živjo

zhivyo

informal

 

dobro jutro

 

morning

 

dober dan

 

afternoon

 

dober večer

doh-bear vetch-air

evening

South African English

hoezit

howzit

informal

Spanish

hola

O-la

 

 

aló

a-LO

 

 

qué pasa

 

informal

Swahili

jambo

 

 

Swedish

hej

hey

informal

 

god dag

 

formal

Swiss German

grüzi

grew-tsi

 

Tagalog (Pilipino — Philippines)

kumusta ka

 

«how are you?»

Tahitian

ia orana

 

 

Tamil

vanakkam

 

 

Telugu

namaskaram

 

 

 

baagunnara

 

formal: «How are you?»

Tetum (Timor — Leste)

bondia

 

morning

 

botarde

 

afternoon

 

bonite

 

evening

Thai

sawa dee-ka

 

said by a female

 

sawa dee-krap

 

said by a male

Tongan

malo e leilei

 

 

Tsonga (South Africa)

minjhani

 

when greeting adults

 

kunjhani

 

when greeting peers or juniors

Turkish

merhaba

 

formal

 

naber?

 

Informal

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