How to read bass clef – Size Up the Staff: How to Read Treble and Bass Clef

Size Up the Staff: How to Read Treble and Bass Clef

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By Jerry Kovarsky

Long ago, the early music scholars came up with a system of lines and spaces called a staff or stave to represent notes or pitches. Each staff is a grouping of five lines and four spaces. The clef — either treble or bass — tells you what names to give those lines and spaces.

Start with the treble clef (your right hand)

Simplistically, you can think of the upper staff, called the treble clef, as the right hand part.

From the bottom up, the lines are E, G, B, D, and F.

Students traditionally use easy-to-remember phrases (called mnemonic devices) to memorize these notes, such as “Every Good Boy Does Fine” or “Elephants Get Big Dirty Feet.” Some consider the first option sexist in today’s politically correct society, and perhaps others feel the second is disparaging to elephants, who are nice creatures. So feel free to make up your own!

The lines skip a note each time; those notes — F, A, C, and E from bottom to top — are located in the spaces in between. “FACE” is an easy enough mnemonic to remember them, but you can make up a phrase if that helps you. So the treble staff represents the E above middle C to the F an octave above middle C.

If you need to go above or below the staff, you just add one or more small extra lines to each individual note to represent how much farther up or down it is. So going down from the low E on the staff, you have the D in space below, and then a note head with a short line through it to represent the next line note, middle C.

In the beginning of your reading studies, you should identify notes by counting the names up (or down) from the last line of the staff. Over time, you’ll come to instantly recognize the notes within two lines above and below the staff, and then you’ll only have to count up (or down) from those.

Meet the bass clef (your left hand)

The lower staff of full piano music is called the bass clef. It uses the same concepts as the treble clef in the, but the names of the lines and spaces are different. Common mnemonics to memorize include “Good Boys Do Fine Always” and “Great Big Dogs Fight Animals.” Or you can make up your own.

The spaces are A, C, E, and G from bottom to top. “All Cows Eat Grass” is an easy enough mnemonic to remember them, but as always, you can make up another phrase if you’d prefer.

The notes above and below the bass clef staff are represented by the same method as the treble staff.


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How to read notes on Bass clef (F clef)

Name of the notes on the G key

How to read notes on Bass clef (F clef)

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When the F-clef is placed on the fourth line, it is called the bass clef. This is the only F-clef used today, so that the terms F-clef and bass clef are often regarded as synonymous. In this game, notes will appear randomly on the F clef sheet, click on the correct note and you will learn how to read notes on this key.

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Best players
148 ptsgoultch30-12-2018
247 ptsmami200427-12-2018
342 ptsSOLFMCT31-12-2018
440 ptsSOURIS BLANCHE18-12-2018
537 ptsTieumaxvx27-12-2018
630 ptsMag1017-12-2018
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Best averages
141.3333mami2004
240.4815goultch
333.2176SOLFMCT
431.0149SOURIS BLANCHE
526.3333Leoapaul
625.7205Tieumaxvx
719.2121Mag10
814.5714Legen_62
94.0000626442″Bf»
103.0000Guiguella
Total points
116941SOLFMCT
25890Tieumaxvx
32536Mag10
42186goultch
52078SOURIS BLANCHE
6620mami2004
7102Legen_62
879Leoapaul
94626442″Bf»
103Guiguella
Total games
1510SOLFMCT
2229Tieumaxvx
3132Mag10
467SOURIS BLANCHE
554goultch
615mami2004
77Legen_62
83Leoapaul
91Guiguella
101626442″Bf»

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How to Read a Bass Clef

The clef is the first symbol that appears on the musical staff, the
set of five lines on which musical notes and symbols are written. The
clef tells you which notes are indicated by each line and space. To
play the piano, you must be able to recognize the notes in both treble
and bass clef.Difficulty:ChallengingInstructions Recognize the
symbols for the bass and treble clefs. The treble clef symbol
resembles a curly backwards «S.» The bass clef looks like a backwards
«C» with a colon (:) to the right. Piano music is written with two
staffs; the treble clef is on the top staff and the bass clef is on
the lower staff.
Understand that there are always five lines and
four spaces on a staff

Arts & Entertainment

Bass clef is the lower section in sheet music where the lower range of
notes is represented. Normally, the bass clef represents the rhythm or
harmony of a piece of music. Learning to read sheet music can seem
impossible, but all it takes is a little
practice.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Keyboard or piano
Sheet music
Blank staff paper
class=»error»>Print some blank staff paper to write notes on (see
Resources).
Learn the symbol that differentiates between the treble
and bass clef. The base clef is represented by what looks like a large
comma with two dots. (See the image for the actual symbol.)
Learn
the mnemonic (memory) device for the

Education

Most musicians can read music by sight, but transposing is a skill
possessed by far fewer instrumentalists. Learning to transpose by
sight takes a lot of practice, but transposing bass to treble clef on
paper is simple and quick, and a good way to build understanding of
the concept of transposition.Difficulty:EasyInstructions Things
You’ll Need
Staff paper
Pencil

Set up the
staff paper with a treble clef in one staff and a bass clef on the
staff below.
Write out any notes or melody you’d like to transpose
on the staff with the bass clef.
Transpose the music by moving each
note up by a third. An easy way to do this is to move all notes on a
line up to th

Arts & Entertainment

The bass clef is the set of lines and spaces that appears in the lower
portion of a grand staff. The bass clef contains the lower notes,
while the upper set of lines and spaces (known as the treble clef)
contains the higher notes. The key signature of the bass clef
indicates which notes should be played sharp or flat. Playing a note
sharp means to raise it by one half step in pitch. You can read sharps
in the bass clef once you learn which notes the lines and spaces
represent.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Look for one sharp
alone. It will be on the second line from the top of the bass clef.
This is an F#, since this line is the F line. An F# indicates the key
of G major.
Look

Arts & Entertainment

The piano plays in both treble and bass clef simultaneously. When a
pianist approaches a new piece, he is required to read both clefs.
Learning to read the bass clef is simple if you already understand how
the treble clef works. Even if you don’t know how to read the treble
clef, there are some tricks that will help you learn to read the notes
of both clefs. By taking the time to understand the bass clef, you
will improve your understanding of music and your ability to play
it.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Examine the bass clef symbol. It
resembles a backwards «C» with two dots placed on the third and fourth
space. The line directly between the two dots represents the note
F.
Establi

Arts & Entertainment

Changing notes written originally on the treble clef to the bass clef
may be needed when a songwriter changes his mind and decides a
particular musical phrase should be played on a bass clef instrument
rather than a treble clef instrument. Since music note values are the
same regardless of the clef the notes are written on, changing notes
on treble clef is easier than it seems. Nothing needs to be changed
other than the staff lines the notes appear on.Difficulty:Moderately
EasyInstructions Things You’ll Need
Pencil
Music staff
paper

Familiarize yourself with both the treble
and bass clef notes. The lines on the treble clef are E-G-B-D-F and
the spaces are F-A

Arts & Entertainment

The euphonium, a brass horn that is built in the key of B flat, is
typically used as a bass instrument. It is common for many euphonium
parts to be written in treble clef for trumpet players. There is some
transposition, or changing of musical keys, that goes on when the
clefs are changed. The interval between a bass clef and a treble clef
for euphonium is a major ninth. Despite the large jump, the euphonium
will still remain in the lower
registers.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll Need
2
sheets staff paper

Write out the music to be
transposed in bass clef on the first sheet of paper.
Indicate that
the music will be in treble clef on the second sh

Arts & Entertainment

bighow.org

How To Read Music- Treble Clef Notes & Bass Clef Notes

Hello Aspiring Musicians!

Today I’m going to teach you the names of the music notes on the staff.  If you don’t already know the names of the notes on the keyboard, you’ll need to learn them first- Check out this video.

 

There are 5 lines and 4 spaces on the music staff.

Each of these lines and spaces represent an individual note on the keyboard. In vocal and piano music, there are two different clefs that appear on the staff. A clef is a musical symbol used to indicate the pitch of written notes.

 

                                                  Treble Clef                       Bass Clef

Let’s start with the treble clef notes.

Treble clef is the clef most often used in vocal music. For this reason, it is my favorite clef. (No offense bass clef, you’ve got your charm). In choral music, female voice parts are written in the treble clef. Music written for a soloist (male or female) is almost always written in treble clef as well.

You can use mnemonic devices (a learning technique that aids information retention) to learn the names of the music notes on the staff.

The first letter of each word in the phrase “Every Good Boy Deserves Fun” can be used to remember the notes written on the lines of the treble clef. EGBDF

In treble clef the spaces from bottom to top spell the word “FACE”.

 

 

Now bass clef notes!

 

   Use the phrase “Good Boys Do Fine Always” to remember the lines on the bass clef and “All Cows Eat Grass” to remember the spaces.

 

In choral music male voice parts are written in bass clef ( with the exception of the tenor part.)

How to practice

The mnemonic devices are a good way to learn the note names in the beginning, but to effectively read music you need to be able to identify each note immediately by sight. Flash cards are a great tool for drilling the note names. Click Here for an inexpensive set of flash cards that will help you practice.

Try quizzing yourself by opening a piece of music and naming notes. You’ll notice that some notes are outside (above and below) the staff.  These are called ledger line notes and we’ll visit them in the next lesson.

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Sight Reading Tips: How To Read Treble & Bass Clef At The SAME TIME

This morning I received a really good question from a reader on sight reading the grand staff. Here’s what his email said:

 

 

Bella I enjoy your videos.  I can read any one clef at a time without any problem but have difficulty reading two chefs at a time.  Any suggestions?

Dennis in Holland, Michigan

 

Well, Dennis, you’re in luck, because this is something I struggled with for years until I learned a couple tricks that made sight reading both staves way easier for me. Here are my tips:

 

The first thing that helped was when I realized I needed to use my Peripheral vision. You don’t need to look directly at an object to know it’s there.

 

Peripheral vision works up down and sideways. I can see it all.

 

So when you look at the grand staff, choose one staff to focus on and use your peripheral vision to read the other staff. For me, I focus on the Treble clef. I don’t know if that’s common or not, but for me, since the Treble clef tend to hold the melody, that’s where I focus my attention.

 

I’d say I use about 80% of my direct vision on Treble clef and the other 20% on Bass clef.

 

Now how can I get away with this? Doesn’t it seem like I should look directly at each note in order to know what to play?

 

Not necessarily. Because the other trick to sight reading both staves is in looking for similar movements in both hands.

 

Directions can include unison movement, parallel motion, and contrary motion.

 

Unison movement is the easiest to read because both hands are playing the same notes. You can see an example of it in this version of ODE TO JOY:

 

Both hands start on E and move in the same direction.

 

Parallel motion is another easy to read pattern. With parallel motion you have both hands starting on different pitches but moving in the same direction and using the same intervals and rhythms. Here’s an example using another version of ODE TO JOY.

 

The third measure uses parallel motion. Both hands start on different notes, but they move in exactly the same direction, much like unison playing.

 

Contrary motion is when you use the same intervals but the melodies move in the opposite direction. Here’s an example from book 2 of the DOZEN A DAY series.

 

Both hands start on C and move in opposite directions. Notice how both melodies use the same intervals.

 

Hopefully this helps. If you want to strengthen your sight reading skills, I highly recommend reading as many beginner pieces as you can find. This will strengthen your sight reading.

 

Also consider signing up for the membership site waiting list. My beginning course will focus on sight reading as well as improvisation, which I strongly believe go hand in hand.

 

Thanks again, Dennis, for the question.

 

As you can see, I love to help and answer any piano question you may have, so please send me a message or leave a comment. Of course you can also subscribe to my blog and stay up to date on everything I post.

 

Have a great day and be sure to GO PLAY PIANO!

 

XO,

 

 

 

P.S. Don’t forget to share and comment!

 

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How to Learn to Read Bass Clef

You must memorize the notes on the bass and treble clefs in order to
read music. The bass clef is below the treble clef in the grand staff,
which joins two five-lined, four-spaced staffs together. The bass clef
is usually played with the left hand, on a keyboard, and can be easily
memorized by creating your own bass clef
visual.Difficulty:EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Pencil
Paper

Create five straight
horizontal lines, one above the other, making a staff.
Write a bass
clef on the left side of the staff. A bass clef indicates what notes
are associated with the lines and spaces on the staff.
Draw a dot
on each line of the staff.
Write «G» below t

Arts & Entertainment

Bass provides a foundation, helping to bring together the rhythms and
melodies of music. Knowing what to play, by being able to read musical
notes, can open up a world of options for musicians. Reading and
writing musical notation makes communicating between musicians much
easier and often opens up opportunities for professional work as a
musician.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Sheet music with a bass clef
An instrument that plays bass
tones (for example a bass guitar or a piano)

Look
at a sheet of music with a bass clef. The bass clef looks like a large
comma followed by a colon. It is also called an F clef. The bass clef
is placed

Arts & Entertainment

The clef is the first symbol that appears on the musical staff, the
set of five lines on which musical notes and symbols are written. The
clef tells you which notes are indicated by each line and space. To
play the piano, you must be able to recognize the notes in both treble
and bass clef.Difficulty:ChallengingInstructions Recognize the
symbols for the bass and treble clefs. The treble clef symbol
resembles a curly backwards «S.» The bass clef looks like a backwards
«C» with a colon (:) to the right. Piano music is written with two
staffs; the treble clef is on the top staff and the bass clef is on
the lower staff.
Understand that there are always five lines and
four spaces on a staff

Arts & Entertainment

The bass clef is the set of lines and spaces that appears in the lower
portion of a grand staff. The bass clef contains the lower notes,
while the upper set of lines and spaces (known as the treble clef)
contains the higher notes. The key signature of the bass clef
indicates which notes should be played sharp or flat. Playing a note
sharp means to raise it by one half step in pitch. You can read sharps
in the bass clef once you learn which notes the lines and spaces
represent.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Look for one sharp
alone. It will be on the second line from the top of the bass clef.
This is an F#, since this line is the F line. An F# indicates the key
of G major.
Look

Arts & Entertainment

The piano plays in both treble and bass clef simultaneously. When a
pianist approaches a new piece, he is required to read both clefs.
Learning to read the bass clef is simple if you already understand how
the treble clef works. Even if you don’t know how to read the treble
clef, there are some tricks that will help you learn to read the notes
of both clefs. By taking the time to understand the bass clef, you
will improve your understanding of music and your ability to play
it.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Examine the bass clef symbol. It
resembles a backwards «C» with two dots placed on the third and fourth
space. The line directly between the two dots represents the note
F.
Establi

Arts & Entertainment

Learning to read music is a basic requirement of learning to play a
musical instrument. In musical notation, the bass clef simply exists
for instruments that have a low register. If music music written for
these instruments in treble or tenor clef, the notes would sit far
below the staff lines, making it difficult to read. Instruments that
require the learning of bass clef include the piano, the violoncello,
the string bass, and many more.Difficulty:Moderately
ChallengingInstructions Find a book or website that teaches an
overall introduction to reading music. This will help to familiarize
you with basic terms such as «staff lines», «time signatures», «sharps
and flats», and the different

Arts & Entertainment

The euphonium, a brass horn that is built in the key of B flat, is
typically used as a bass instrument. It is common for many euphonium
parts to be written in treble clef for trumpet players. There is some
transposition, or changing of musical keys, that goes on when the
clefs are changed. The interval between a bass clef and a treble clef
for euphonium is a major ninth. Despite the large jump, the euphonium
will still remain in the lower
registers.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll Need
2
sheets staff paper

Write out the music to be
transposed in bass clef on the first sheet of paper.
Indicate that
the music will be in treble clef on the second sh

Arts & Entertainment

bighow.org

How to Read a Bass Clef

Things Needed
  • Sheet music with a bass clef
  • An instrument that plays bass tones (for example a bass guitar or a piano)

How to Read a Bass Clef. Bass provides a foundation, helping to bring together the rhythms and melodies of music. Knowing what to play, by being able to read musical notes, can open up a world of options for musicians. Reading and writing musical notation makes communicating between musicians much easier and often opens up opportunities for professional work as a musician.

Look at a sheet of music with a bass clef. The bass clef looks like a large comma followed by a colon. It is also called an F clef. The bass clef is placed at the beginning of a music staff, which is the lines and spaces on which the notes are written. There are five lines and four spaces between the lines.

Learn which pitches correspond to which lines and spaces on the staff. Pitches are represented by the letters; A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Musical notes are placed on the lines and spaces to symbolize what pitches to play. In a bass clef the lines, starting from the bottom, stand for G, B, D, F and A and the spaces, starting from the bottom, stand for A, C, E and G.

Help yourself remember the pitches by forming a sentence where the first letter of each word corresponds to the lines and spaces. For the pitches on the lines, G, B, D, F and A, try the sentence «Good boys do fine always.» For the pitches on the spaces, A, C, E and G, try the sentence «All cows eat grass.»

Sometimes pitches are lower or higher than what can be shown on the staff. The spaces and lines of the staff repeat above and below it, though they are not shown unless they are needed for these lower or higher pitches. When needed, these notes are placed on ledger lines, small lines holding one note.

Get to know accidentals, these are symbols that signify a pitch is raised or lowered. If these symbols appear right after the bass clef, they affect the entire piece of music. If they appear before the note, they only affect that measure. Sharps raise the pitch half of a step and their symbol resembles a crooked # sign. Flats lower the pitch half a step and their symbol resembles a lower case «b.»

Practice reading the bass clef. This is the best way to improve your ability. Try to practice at least a couple of times a week. It may be especially useful to play along with the corresponding audio as you read the notation to help understand how the bass part fits in with the rest of the musical arrangement. Though it might be a slow struggle at first, eventually your speed and accuracy will improve.

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