How to hang a hammock – How to Hang a Hammock

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How to Hang a Hammock in Your Backyard

Dreaming of whiling away the afternoon cradled in a hammock? Just follow these easy tips.

Lying in a hammock is the epitome of summertime relaxation. Getting the hammock set up, on the other hand, can be a frustrating endeavor. Consult the tips below to make quick and easy work of the process so that soon, you will have gone from hanging the hammock to hanging out in its comfy, swaying embrace.

Location

Choosing a location for your hammock is perhaps the most difficult part. While you probably don’t have the perfect pair (and ideally spaced) palm trees on your property, you might very well have two healthy oak, maple or beech trees that are strong enough to support your weight. Ideally, those hardwoods would be as far apart as the total length of your hammock, fully stretched out.

If the trees are too close together, the underside of the hammock is going to scrape along the ground. If the trees are too far apart, you’ll need to extend the reach of the hammock by means of an added-on rope or chain. While there’s a simple remedy for the latter problem, there’s unfortunately no fix for the former (other than to buy another, smaller hammock). Note, however, that it can be a mistake to extend a hammock any more than 18 inches at each end. Doing so leaves it vulnerable to ripping. So if you fully anticipate having to add extensions, only consider buying a hammock outfitted with a spreader bar to inhibit rips.

Suspension

For obvious reasons, it’s important to establish a secure connection at each end of the hammock. One option is to use tree-fastening straps (which may or may not be included with your purchase). These straps feature a loop on one end and a metal ring on the other. Simply wrap the strap around the tree, pass the loop through the metal ring, then attach the hammock to the ring with S-hook hardware. One virtue of tree-fastening straps is that while effective, they cause no harm to the trees involved.

Though there are countless hammocks on the market, most fall into one or two design categories. First, you have traditional hammocks, and then you have hammocks with spreader bars. Traditional hammocks are meant to hang loosely between two trees, with the center dipping down. Since they get attached to points that are 6 to 8-feet high on nearby trees, you can, in a pinch, consider using tree branches, not tree trunks — so long as the branches offer sufficient heft.

The other type of hammock involves spreader bars, which force the hammock to remain open, so the occupant never becomes wrapped up in a hammock burrito. Unlike the traditional design, hammocks with spreaders hang only 4 or 5 feet from the ground. Also, whereas a traditional hammock hangs loosely, these hammocks hang taut; when unoccupied, they are virtually parallel with the ground.

Remember that the wonderful thing about hanging a hammock is that once you’ve finished the job, your reward is right there in front you. Collapse into your new favorite spot — hey, you’ve earned a break!

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Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Zillow.

www.zillow.com

How to Hang a Hammock

How to Hang a Hammock

Photo: shutterstock.com

Laying in a hammock is the epitome of summertime relaxation. Getting the hammock set up, on the other hand, can be a frustrating endeavor. Consult the tips below to make quick and easy work of the process so that soon, you will have gone from hanging the hammock to hanging out in its comfy, swaying embrace.

Location
Choosing a location for your hammock is perhaps the most difficult part. While you probably don’t have the perfect pair (and ideally spaced) palm trees on your property, you might very well have two healthy oak, maple, or beech trees that are strong enough to support your weight. Ideally, those hardwoods would be as far apart as the total length of your hammock, fully stretched out.

If the trees are too close together, the underside of the hammock is going to scrape along the ground. If the trees are too far apart, you’ll need to extend the reach of the hammock by means of an added-on rope or chain. While there’s a simple remedy for the latter problem, there’s unfortunately no fix for the former (other than to buy another, smaller hammock). Note, however, that it can be a mistake to extend a hammock any more than 18 inches at each end. Doing so leaves it vulnerable to ripping. So if you fully anticipate having to add extensions, only consider buying a hammock outfitted with a spreader bar to inhibit rips.

How to Hang a Hammock - Detail Suspension

Photo: shutterstock.com

Suspension
For obvious reasons, it’s important to establish a secure connection at each end of the hammock. One option is to use tree-fastening straps (which may or may not be included with your purchase). These straps feature a loop on one end and a metal ring on the other. Simply wrap the strap around the tree, pass the loop through the metal ring, then attach the hammock to the ring with S-hook hardware. One virtue of tree-fastening straps is that while effective, they cause no harm to the trees involved.

Though there are countless hammocks on the market, most fall into one or two design categories. First, you have traditional hammocks, and then you have hammocks with spreader bars (like the one pictured at right). Traditional hammocks are meant to hang loosely between two trees, with the center dipping down. Since they get attached to points that are six to eight feet high up on nearby trees, you can, in a pinch, consider using tree branches, not tree trunks—so long as the branches offer sufficient heft.

The other type of hammock involves spreader bars, which force the hammock to remain open, so the occupant never becomes wrapped up in a hammock burrito. Unlike the traditional design, hammocks with spreaders hang only four or five feet from the ground. Also, whereas a traditional hammock hangs loosely, these hammocks hang taut; when unoccupied, they are virtually parallel with the ground.

Remember that the wonderful thing about hanging a hammock is that once you’ve finished the job, your reward is right there in front you. Collapse into your new favorite spot—hey, you’ve earned a break!

www.bobvila.com

How to Hang a Camping Hammock: Essentials and Best Practices

How to Hang a Camping Hammock – Essentials and Best Practices

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Before getting into how to hang a hammock, you should know what type of camping hammock you own or would like to purchase.

It’s not as easy to figure out as a tent, which usually has color-coded poles and clips to simplify assembly.

A hammock is a lot more manual and intuitive. The setup varies a little bit from location and location.

When you get your hammock, you should master how the hanging equipment works. With that knowledge, you’ll be able to set it up anywhere.

Deciding On Your Colors

The color of your hammock and your straps are more important than you may know. If you’re going on a hunting trip, you’ll want your hammock to be either dull green or camouflage.

You want to maintain low visibility in your campsite to avoid running the animals off.

If you intend on wandering around and leaving your campsite frequently, a brightly colored hammock will help you find your way back to where you belong. You’ll be able to see it from a longer distance, and you’re less likely to get lost.

Some people prefer brightly colored straps. Sometimes, straps are harder to see in low lit environments.

Campers can absentmindedly run into these straps, knocking themselves backward.

If you’re concerned that you might trip, opt for brightly colored straps or straps with colored stitching. They’re a little easier to see.

Types of Camping Hammocks

Gathered End

This hammock is gathered at each end, hence the name, Gathered End Hammock. This hammock is easy to hang and get in and out of. It is well suited for lying at an angle and does not take up a lot of length under a tarp.

They are also usually the lightest hammocks, and the most widespread hammock available. This guide focuses on the gathered end hammock.

Bridge Hammock

This hammock has spreader bars and is wider at the top and narrower at the feet. A Bridge Hammock needs a smaller hang degree than other hammock types.

You do not lie at an angle in a bridge hammock, but there is more room to spread your feet and they do not squeeze your shoulders like other hammock types.

They do however have less room for your arms as they are narrow in the middle. Also, you need to consider the weight the spreader bars add when backpacking.

90 Degree

This hammock is suspended from the sides of the hammock as opposed to the ends. This Hammock requires a special sleeping pad that has air chambers that run up and down the length of the hammock.

The benefit of this hammock is that it lays flat, so if you sleep on your stomach this may be a good option.

There is no shoulder squeeze, but they usually weigh more than other hammocks. It will also need an especially large tarp because of the way your body is positioned.

Double Layer

This is not actually a type, but it is an important feature you can choose when selecting a hammock.

Double layers hold more weight and can accommodate a sleeping pad between the layers. They also give more protection from bug or mosquito bites than a single layer.

Location, Location, Location – Where to Hang a Hammock?

Where should you hang your camping hammock?

Unlike camping tents, hammocks can’t go just anywhere. If you’re camping in the desert or on a mountain, you may not be able to find the trees you need to set that hammock up

So, the standard answer is between two trees, and that is a great answer, but there is more to the answer than that. The quality of the tree matters. There are also other places you can hang your hammock.

The perfect hammock campsite is an area that’s at least lightly wooded. You’re going to need to find two sturdy trees that are close enough together to safely hang your hammock.

About Trees

The ‘best’ way how to hang a hammock is generally thought to be between two trees. The trees need to be healthy and large enough to hold your weight. No saplings or young trees!

The roots of young trees are not deep enough. Dead trees are also bad because they may not be able to hold your bodyweight. They’ll also shake in windy, rainy weather, and this can cause your hammock to slip.

Find old trees with a larger diameter, and make sure there are no hanging branches that may fall on you when you sleep.

You might want to trim the trees with a camping machete before you set up the tent.

The trees should be 12-15 feet apart for standard size hammocks and 13-17 feet for Extra Large models.

Other Hanging Locations

If you do not have two trees available that does not automatically mean you won’t be able to use a camping hammock.

You can hang from rock formations, cars, overhead cables (non-electric of course) securely planted signposts, and more.

This guide will focus on how to set up a hammock between two trees because it is the most common way, not because it is the only way.

Essential Hammock Hanging Definitions

Anchors

The two trees/posts/points etc where the hammock hangs from. These should be between 12 and 15 feet or 3 paces, 6 steps or 4 to 5 meters apart.

The measurements are approximate so there is no need to pack the measuring tape.

Sheer Force

The perpendicular force of the occupied hammocks weight on your anchor point and suspension. Think of it as a force pulling the tree down on top of you and make sure you use a solid healthy tree to hang your hammock from.

This force is calculated using the weight in the hammock (that would be you) and the angle your suspension has relative to the anchor point. A larger angle means less force.

Suspension

The webbing, rope, cord, knots, hitches, toggles and carabineers, etc that you use to hang the camping hammock.

Ridgeline

There are two types of hammock ridgelines, structural and non-structural. The structural ridgeline of a hammock is a tight cord of a set length that directs the hang or sag of the hammock and is built into the hammock.

A structural ridgeline will increase the shear force so you will need to make sure your anchor points are up to the task.

A non-structural ridgeline is a cord or line built into the hammock used to hang a bug net but does not change the way the hammock lays.

A tarp ridgeline is used to hold a tarp or other gear and is generally separate from the hammock itself.

Cord Tension

The force exerted by the cords of your suspension system on the anchor points. This force is similar to shear force, but it pulls down the angle of the cord, as opposed to perpendicular.

Suspension Length

The length from the hammock end to the hang point on the anchor.

Seat Height

The height of your hammock measured, when occupied, at the lowest point of the hammock.

Basically, how high your butt is from the ground when you are in the hammock. Ideally, this should be about the height of the seat on a chair (aka seat height).

Hang Angle

The angle of your suspension cord. The angle starts with a horizontal line and is measured up to the angle the cord makes with the anchor. This should be about 30 degrees.

Hang Point / Attachment Point

How high up the suspension is attached to the anchor. The hang points should line up with each other, so if the ground is uneven, they will not necessarily be hung at the same height from the ground, only hung in line with each other to make a straight horizontal line.

Hardware

In the case of a camping hammock, the hardware is a piece of equipment used in place of a knot.

This can be a carabineer, toggle, clip or any number of inventions. There are many types of hardware that could possibly be used in the suspension.

Hardware is sometimes easier and faster than tying knots, but it also weighs more and sucks if you forget it and don’t know how to tie knots.

  • Carabineer – a ring, sometimes D shaped, used frequently by rock climbers. It has a small latch that opens inward. In the case of a camping hammock, it is a piece of hardware used as part of the suspension.
  • Toggle or Toggle hitch – is a DIY hardware solution, usually a stick, that is used to attach the webbing to the hammock cord, or can be used for other tasks like hanging supplies.

Photo credit: Pearson Scott Foresman

  • Knots – knots are used to tie up and attach the suspension. They can be used instead of hardware. Knots take time and practice to use and are tricky with a slippery material. Knots can also reduce the load a cable or cord is able to hold.

The benefits of knots are they do not add weight and are handy in case of emergencies, or if you lose your hardware.

Lay

The angle and bend of your hammock as you sleep.

The closer to a horizontal line the more the hammock allows you to sleep in a ‘flatter’ lay. More on this later.

How to Hang a Hammock with Ropes

The best way to hang a hammock with ropes is to allow friction to do most of the work. Simply by wrapping the rope tightly around a tree several times and tying a sturdy knot, you’ll be able to keep your hammock up.

The friction will prevent the hammock from sliding, so long as it’s wrapped and tied as tightly as possible.

For extra security, choose a forked area of the tree. Even if it slips, it won’t be able to slide all the way down the trunk of the tree.

The notch will catch the line. If you’re ever worried that your knots and weight won’t hold up on a smooth trunk, always hook your hammock up around a fork between two large limbs.

You may have to climb to reach these points, but that’s a small price to pay for safety.

There are a lot of kinds of rope, but cotton ropes or paracord are the best kinds of ropes to use.

Cotton is resistant to the UV rays of the sun, and it won’t degrade over time. It’s safe to get cotton wet, and it’s durable enough to hold a heavy weight load.

Knots in cotton can be tied very tightly and will not slip. As long as the ends are sealed, cotton rope is unlikely to fray. Just be careful not to snag it.

Paracord can hold a lot of weight, but you may want to braid or weave several lengths of paracord together before you use it to hang your hammock.

Paracord is very thin, and you don’t want to skimp out on the durability. It takes a little time, but you can hold onto these woven or braided lengths of rope for the next time you go camping.

As far as the knots you use, a basic knot will work fine with simple hanging methods. It doesn’t hurt to learn a few extra knots that will hold better.

School of Hard Knots

You should learn a few basic knots, even if you don’t plan to use them. If hardware breaks or gets lost, or some other emergency arises they can be quite useful, and its free to learn and use.

Plus, if someone asks: “Do you know how to hang a hammock with a rope?” You could enjoy being a bit of a scout and with confidence say: “Of course!”

Sheet Bend/Hammock Knot/ Becket Hitch/Weavers Knot

Commonly used to tie hammocks, it is quick to tie up and release and is frequently used to join two ropes with different diameters, such as the webbing and the hammock cord.

Photo credit: Sawims

Double Overhand Knot

A stopper knot used to secure the webbing to the anchor.

Photo credit: Markus Bärlocher

Clove Hitch

This hitch is good where you need to make adjustments, like support lines or lines running to stakes.

Photo credit: Parkis

Bowline

A knot which forms a fixed loop. It is easy to tie and untie.

Photo credit: David J. Fred

Taught Line Hitch/ Riggers Hitch

This knot also makes a loop, but this loop is adjustable and is used on lines under tension.

Photo credit: Chris 73

Truckers Hitch

This knot makes a fixed loop in a line which is used as a pulley point to add tension to a line threaded through the loop.

Photo credit: StromBer

Tied Tight or Let Loose?

There is some debate as to whether suspension lines should be tied tighter or looser. Some say the benefits of a tighter line are they make for a flatter lay, but that is debatable.

Laying on the diagonal is actually better for getting a flatter lay, but some taller folks like tighter lines.

The cons of tight lines are they add more cord tension and shear force, so you will need stronger anchors.

They also make gathered hammocks tighter at the shoulders and can make the hammock a bit claustrophobic.

If the line is too tight you will not be able to turn, adjust or even lay on the diagonal. Too loose of a line and the camping hammock will have too great a sag and be uncomfortable.

Get Your Hang on in 7 Easy Steps – How to Set Up a Hammock

Note: For simplicity, the terms here are defined above. Also, there are many ways you can set up a hammock, the following is one way to hang a hammock, not the ‘best’ way to hang a hammock or the ‘only’ way to hang a hammock.

Those things do not exist. These steps use widespread techniques, and the most prevalent hammock, the gathered end hammock.

1. Select Your Anchors

Usually two trees 12 to 15’ apart. (See Anchors in the definitions above for more info)

2. Attach Webbing Straps to Hang Points

Webbing straps should be 1 to 1.5 inch wide straps. The width protects tree bark from being damaged because the weight is spread out, as opposed to a rope where the weight is focused on a smaller area and can cut into the bark.

The hang point should be about 6 feet up the anchor (tree, post, or whatever you are hanging the hammock on).

If the ground is uneven or sloped, the hang points should be set in a horizontal line, or the same relative height.

3. Install Bug Net (optional, if you use an aftermarket or unattached bug net)

There are two kinds of bug nets. One of them attaches directly to the hammock, and the other one is loose and flowing. These kinds of nets aren’t worth getting.

Insects will simply fly up underneath it and become trapped in your hammock. Always choose a bug net that attaches right to the hammock, or slides over the hammock.

All you need to do to install a bug net is run a thin line a few feet over the top of the hammock. Pull the net up, and clip it to the line. It will create a tent-shaped enclosure.

The net shouldn’t fall on you while you’re sleeping. Never attempt to sleep with the net lying directly on top of you. You can get tangled up in your sleep and tear the net.

If your camping hammock does not have an integrated bug net, you can place one over the suspension and the hammock before you tie everything up.

4. Attach Hammock Rope to the Webbing

The hammock rope is the rope coming from the ends of the hammock. This must be tied to the webbing using a knot or secured to the webbing using hardware.

A sheet bend is an example of a classic knot used for this purpose. A carabineer is a more modern piece of hardware that serves this purpose as well.

5. Adjust Your Hang

Aim for 30 Degree hang angle. Adjust the hang so your sit height is a foot to a foot and a half off the ground. You don’t need to bring any tools to measure, you can just eyeball it.

There are also phones that have apps that can act as a level and give you an idea of the angle you have if you bring your phone and are so inclined.

6. Add a Tarp

Some hammocks come with a rain fly or tarp, and other manufacturers may require you to purchase one separately. A tarp is useful for protecting against the elements, such as rain. They also block wind and keep heat in.

If you’re camping somewhere that sees frequent rainfall or you just like to be prepared, you’ll definitely want a rain fly to rely on.

The way a tarp needs to be set up depends on the style of the fly. Most of them are easy and require three connection points.

After your hammock is installed, you’ll run a thin line a few feet over the top. The center of the rain fly will clip to this line, and this is how it will stay above you. The sides of the rain fly will also need to be either staked to the ground or affixed to other trees.

With guylines, you can pull the sides until they’re taught and as far from the center as they can be without being stretched.

If the tension is too high, the hard rain can actually puncture the rain fly, and wind storms can cause it to tear. Using tent stakes, anchor these guy lines to the ground.

7. Add Underquilt or Undercover (optional, sort of)

Hammock Camping can get cold quick. If you are camping in cold weather or there are strong winds you might want to use an underquilt or undercover respectively.

There are other methods to stay warm but an under quilt is popular because it does not shift or compress and is effective.

An undercover can be a tarp or Mylar blanket that you hang under your hammock to block the wind.

You can also add insulation to an undercover, like dried leaves or camping gear that sit between the undercover and the hammock.

If you can carry one with you and you’d like to get one, some manufacturers make sleeping pads for hammocks.

These are thin pieces of slightly flexible foam that fit inside of your hammock. They’ll offer you a little more back support, and reduce the amount of curling you’ll experience. All you need to do is set this pad inside of the hammock and lay on it.

Many hammock pads have a texture that’s designed to minimize slipping, but the material of a hammock naturally encourages sliding.

This pad may shift throughout the night, and you may need to readjust is as it comes out from under you.

One of the best workarounds to this is to use hammock sleeping pad wings. These are a slipcover that fits over the hammock sleeping pad that will help you affix it to the hammock.

It will prevent the sleeping pad from sliding, allowing you to get a great night’s rest without having to wake up and make adjustments.

Now, what about if you have hammock tree straps? How do you set up your hammock then?

How to Set Up a Hammock with Straps

Most people will use tree straps to hang their hammocks because they’re the easiest method.

Tree straps come in different lengths. The distance between trees varies by the length of the straps you’re using.

Most manufacturers will clearly state the combined length of the straps, helping you determine the maximum length between trees.

Most straps are made of a polyester kind of material. These are durable and woven thick. They’re less likely to snag when they come into contact with tree bark, and it’s safe to get them wet.

Look for hammock tree straps with loops that are at least double stitched, although triple stitched straps are better for durability.

Avoid straps made of a material that can stretch or straps with single stitched loops – they’ll warp over time, and using them can become dangerous.

Hammock straps feature loops. The amount of loops varies from strap to strap, but they all serve the same purpose. Wrap the strap around the tree, and pull the slack through the tightest loop. It should wrap around the tree, and free up the slack.

You should do this at least five feet above the ground, slightly above the widest part of the trunk. Never try to stretch your straps beyond their limits – doing so can cause damage.

Hanging it between trees that are too close together can cause sagging, which can cause the hammock to drop.

Use the carabiners to attach your hammock to the straps. They’ll clip right on. After you’ve clipped it, test out the strength by slowly sitting on your hammock, seeing how it reacts to your weight.

If it wiggles or slides, stop and adjust the hammock to make it tighter.

You may have to play with the tension for a little while by making a series of small adjustments, but don’t settle for “good enough”. Your hammock needs to keep you safe, so it’s not worth cutting corners.

How to Set Up a Permanent Hammock

Ropes and straps can be used to hang up permanent hammocks, but if you know your hammock is going to be in one spot for a very long time, you may want to take things to the next level.

If you have trees or posts in your yard and that’s where you intend to hang your hammock, there are several ways you can do it.

Some people prefer to attach the straps or ropes to eyelets or hooks that have been drilled directly into the posts or trees.

If you’re working with trees, it’s worth noting that permanently screwing or drilling anything into that tree will damage it.

It’s unlikely it will kill the tree, but it won’t be able to recover. Make sure you’re drilling far enough into the tree, past the bark. If the bark sheds, you don’t want to lose your hooks.

You can also purchase a hammock anchoring kit. Every kit works differently, and they’ll come with instructions.

Most of them involve tapping special nails into a tree that are designed to hold the weight of your straps or ropes.

Always consult the instructions before you set up the anchor kit. If you don’t follow the instructions, you can wind up with a dangerous assembly that won’t hold up over time.

How to Sleep in a Hammock

Hammocks are designed with different height and weight limits. Always choose one that’s appropriate for you. If the hammock is too small for you, you won’t be able to sleep.

You may even break the hammock in the middle of the night, which may potentially injure you.

If you’re ever unsure, purchase a double hammock and use it alone. These generally offer more space.

Entering a Hammock

For a gathered end hammock grab the edge of the hammock material at the center and lift it up.

Take a step or two back. Place your bottom in the center of the material lean back into the hammock while letting your feet lift off the ground. Place your legs in the center. Ta-da

Sleep Diagonally

The most often way how to hang a hammock seems – between two trees. Which isn’t wrong, but there are other ways too.

The same with sleeping.

Usually, it’s assumed that one must sleep parallel to the hammock – which basically leaves you in a banana position.

Laying at an angle, or diagonally, means one side of your body is turned to the left and the other to the right. You’re making the most of the surface area of the hammock, and reducing the natural curling that happens to the sides when a camper climbs inside.

This will allow you to sleep in a more flat position, not the curve you see before you enter the hammock.

Another way to reduce this curling is to use a spreader bar. Not all hammocks are compatible with spreader bars, so check with your hammocks manual before you attempt to use one.

Banana Lay

This is when you sit parallel to the edges of the hammock. It is called a banana lay because your body is in the shape or curve similar to a banana. This is OK for lounging, but not great for sleeping.

If you pull your lines too tight, you will end up this way by default, which is why you should not tie the suspension too tight.

Just because you can pull the cords so tight the hammock looks flat, does not mean it will stay that way once you enter.

Some Useful Tips for You

  • Water Dripping – If you have water that drips from the suspension lines, tie a small piece of utility rope on the line with the tie ends facing down. The water will then drip down the ends of the tie instead on into your hammock.
  • Cold weather – If the weather will be cold or windy you must be prepared. Camping in a hammock leaves you more prone to the elements. An under quilt and undercover is advisable. A sleeping pad can add insulation as well.
  • Your hammock location also plays a role here. If you sleep on the east side of a hill or ridge it is usually less windy and gets the sun first in the morning. Also hang the hammock away from lakes or rivers or any body of water.
  • Another advanced technique serious Hammockers can do is hang the hammock low to the ground and use leaves and insulation or a groove dug in the snow to block the wind. You need something between you and the wind blowing under you stealing all your heat, especially if you do not have an under quilt.

Hanging a Hammock is Easy

As long as you’re following the manufacturer’s instructions for both the hammock and the straps, it isn’t that hard to hang up your hammock.

The guide will show you how to hang a hammock in the way the brand intended. Every accessory you purchase might also come with instructions and they’re worth looking at, no matter how simple they may seem.

These instructions usually feature pictures that make assembly easier. Some hammock manufacturers even make tutorial videos for those who are visual learners.

While one article cannot possibly hope to cover every aspect of camping in a hammock or even every aspect of how to hang a hammock, we hoped to do the topic justice and cover the basics of hanging your hammock.

So, we thank you for reading and happy hanging!

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How to Hang a Hammock by Sunnydaze Decor

So you have your new hammock, or you are considering purchasing one. What next? Where should you hang it, and how can you be sure that it will be secure? There are many different methods you can utilize to hang your hammock; whether it’s between trees, from a wall, posts or on a stand.

Hammocks are wonderful outdoor retreats for resting, lounging, and relaxation during the warmer months of the year If you have the space and the trees, hanging it between trees is a great choice! This method is perhaps one of the most classic techniques for hanging your hammock as that is how hammocks are most often portrayed in movies, cartoons and in the media, plus it just looks the most natural.


If you choose to hang your hammock between two trees, you may be surprised to know that there are different options for hanging the hammock.


Hammock Tree Straps

Tree straps are the perfect option for hanging your hammock on trees without harming the tree. They work by wrapping around any tree and they make it easy for you to position your hammock at the perfect height. In addition, they can be cinched and un-cinched, more easily than rope because of the zinc-plated rings for easy removal and placement.


 

Rope Sets

A nice, sturdy rope is another great option to tie up a hammock between trees, and because most individuals have rope readily available, it won’t cost any money. If you do not have rope on-hand, it’s not that hard to find, any hardware store should have some for you to buy. However, you do have to know how to tie secure knots to avoid falling down when trying to relax in the hammock.


Tree Hooks and Chains

Tree hook and chain hanging kits will give you a secure place to hang your hammock. Simply drill the eye bolts into the tree, attach the chains, and add the S-hooks to hang the hammock on. Just make sure to hang the hooks at the right height because then you only have to drill once.

As an added benefit, with tree hooks you will never have to worry about your hammock losing its grip on the tree and falling. Instead, your hammock will always remain at the perfect height you choose.


Since trees don’t always grow perfectly spaced to accommodate a hammock, get a little more creative and make a fun project out of it!


Posts Secured with Poured Concrete

This is a relatively easy D-I-Y project. Simply set 4 x 4-inch fence posts in a concrete mixture. The posts can be any height you desire, just make sure they are high enough so that the hammock is above the ground when you lay in it. Once the concrete is cured and posts are set place the hammock on the posts using a hanging kit.

An extra advantage with using hammock posts is that it is a permanent fixture, you will not have to worry about putting the posts away. If rough weather comes, all you have to do is bring your hammock inside to store.


Build Your Own Hammock Stand

Research how to build hammock stands, or if you are particularly handy, design a stand and use that for your new hammock. Not only will it be rewarding to build one, you get to use it to relax in your hammock once it is complete.

In addition, building your own hammock stand will offer you the opportunity to make the stand as simple or intricate as you like. You can make a statement piece for your backyard patio, or you can make it portable so you can easily take it camping or to the beach.


Hang it from an Arbor

If you have an arbor, that would be a suitable location for a hammock. Simply use a hammock hanging kit on the sides of the arbor to install the hammock. Not only will it add interest and charm to the space, it will also be an inviting place for you and your family to relax and lounge. Using an arbor to hang your hammock offers many possibilities to create a restful oasis. For instance, you can plant climbing vines and flowers to gracefully scale the sides of the arbor for extra shade and elegance.

The stunning landscaping project shown in the image above was designed and completed by Stuber Land Design, Inc.


Hang it from a Pergola

Like arbors, pergolas create a perfect spot for extra plants, some flowers and greens that can sprawl up the sides of the pergola, and even continue up onto the roof. Therefore, another great idea to create a relaxing and beautiful outdoor space is to hang your hammock diagonally from the posts of a pergola. The shaded top and decorative elements of the structure will make relaxing in the hammock the highlight of your day.


Use a Tree and a Post

If you only have one tree, you can install a post across from it to fit a hammock between. This way you will get the shade from the tree without having to have two trees conveniently located to suit a hammock. Plus, the post you install can be a 4 x 4-inch post or a steel hammock post. You can even make the post a permanent fixture by using poured concrete around the base of the post; this way you do not have to worry about the post ever tipping over.


Use the Posts on the Porch

A unique place that does not usually come to mind for most is between porch posts. Sturdy porch posts are a great option for hammock support that is built-in. This is a great option for you if your home is somewhat lacking in exterior space, or if you do not want to have something extra to mow around.

While you are hanging your hammock on the porch, make sure the distance is not more than 18 feet and the location for the hammock is safe (I.E no railing underneath that the user could fall on), you can also place your hammock diagonally in the corner of a porch.


Hang Between Buildings 

If the buildings are close enough you could hang your hammock between the house and detached garage, garage and shed or house and shed. This is also an excellent option for those who do not have a lot of outdoor lawn or yard space but would still enjoy relaxing outdoors.

Just remember this would require heavy duty hooks or eye screws and they must be fastened through the siding to a wall stud as siding is not strong enough to support the weight of a person in a hammock.


Use the Ceiling or Walls Inside

There’s just something extra unique about hanging a hammock indoors. It’s a great place to read or relax without having to worry about weather or bugs. You might even decide you want to try sleeping in the hammock. In that case, the ceiling or walls in your indoor space, screened-in porch, sun room, or sleeping porch is a fantastic place for hanging a hammock.

To hang your hammock indoors, simply use a hammock hanging kit, eye bolts with load-bearing carabiners, or lag screws and install them into wall studs. That will ensure you have a secure hammock for resting, sleeping and relaxation.


Buy a Hammock Stand

If you are searching for versatility or portability, you can always buy a hammock stand that fits your new hammock. This way, you will be able to hang your hammock anywhere you have the space. In addition, you can often choose a color that best complements your hammock. Plus, with a stand, you do not have to make anything extra or drill any holes. 


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Tips for Hanging Inside & Outside

When it comes to relaxing outdoors, my top two picks would be either lounging on a beach under the sun or rocking under the shade in a big hammock. One of those things is a few thousand miles away from me, the other is in my backyard. Guess which one I do more often…

Hammocks are a great feature for your home, but they can be a pain to set up for the first time. Let’s assume that you’re skipping the convenience of a hammock stand and you want to set this thing up au naturel using what you’ve got around you. Today, we’ll look at the easiest ways you can hang a hammock between two trees or from your patio.

  • Ideally, you want a space of at least 12-16 feet between the trees; this way you can avoid using straps. If the distance is shorter than that, you should just use a hammock stand.
  • The easiest method is to drill a hole for a course-threaded eyebolt (at least 4 inches) and hook it to the hammock with caribiner strong enough to support the weight. The pilot hole you drill should be about 1/8″ to 3/16.”

  • Drill a pilot hole that matches up with an appropriately-sized eye bolt into a beam that’s at least 4×4.
  • Attach a carabiner strong enough to support the weight, hook up your hammock chair and start relaxing!

 

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How To Hang A Hammock

Hammock — a wonderful invention for a holiday vacation. Sitting in it comfortably, so nice to enjoy the peace and tranquility. But first you need to hang a hammock. To learn how to do it correctly, and it will be discussed below.

You will need:

hammock; a small but tight rope; screw-hook.

Instruction how to hang a hammock

Step 1:

Traditionally hammocks suspended from the trunks of trees. But if in your area there are none or too thin trunks, this would be difficult. Correct the situation can be dug into the ground poles, but watch out for the fact that they were part of the land not less than a meter.

Step 2:

In order to determine at what distance should be kept trees (poles), it is sufficient to adhere to the following formula: to the full length of your hammock, add 30 cm For example, if your hammock length of 260 cm, the distance between the trees (poles) should be 290 cm.. note that in time can stretch a hammock, so if you consider suspending this feature. If you decide to hang the hammock on existing supports, the distance between which is less recommended, and larger there is no possibility in this case can be strengthened hooks higher.

Step 3:

The package includes a special hammock each ring, through which the hammock hangs. If you decide to attach to trees, then please make sure that the trunk has a diameter of at least 15-20 cm. In this case, the suspension is only two small but dense pitches, which are threaded through the rings and firmly attached to the trunk.

Step 4:

If you attach the hammock to the posts, then it is better to buy in the construction or hardware store screw-hooks. Note that the larger the hook the more secure attachment you get. When screwing the hook into the base of its type to the direction of the sling hammock — it will help reduce the load on the metal.

Step 5:

If none of the fasteners can not be established, you can buy a ready-made frame hammock. The package includes a metal stand that allows you to place the hammock as the exposed surface and on the enclosed porch. In addition, the stand is easy to fold, and it is very convenient for storing the hammock in winter.

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How to hang a Hammock – Simply Hammocks

If you are unsure you can always call the hammock experts (that’s us!) on 01748 471 299

So you’ve bought a hammock and you’re keen to start using it rightaway. But you’re worried that it requires expert skills to hang and you’re keen to avoid falling to the ground with a great big thump. Well guess what? Hanging a hammock is actually really easy and there is no magic way of doing it. So don’t let anyone tell you otherwise!

We have listed a few different ways to hang a hammock along with the fixings and tips you will need to get started.





Hanging on a stand

Hanging your hammock on a stand is the easiest way as all the hard work has been done for you, especially if you go for one of our Hammock Sets.

If you want to choose your own hammock and stand combination, then look at our Compatibility Guide which will tell you which hammocks and stands are compatible. All our stands include fixings so you don’t need to worry about that.


Between two trees

To fix a hammock to a tree you will need a hammock and a rope fixing like our Smart or Micro Rope Fixing. The ropes wrap around each tree and then link to the loops on your hammocks. Both these ropes are adjustable so you can increase or decrease the tension to suit the distance between your trees.

At Simply Hammocks we often spend our lunch in the surrounding forests near our office. No two trees are exactly the same and we don’t have any trouble finding a way to hang our hammocks thanks to how adjustable these rope fixings are.


Tip:
Measure the distance between your two desired trees. Choose your hammock. Now ensure the hammocks total length is at least 1m less than the total distance between the trees to give enough distance for your rope fixings.

I only have one tree!!!

That’s fine, you are in luck. You can attach one end of the hammock to the tree using a Smart or Micro Rope Fixing and the other end to a Madera Post.

It means you can then enjoy having your hammock between a tree.

Between two concrete/brick walls 

To attach your hammock to a wall you will need an Easy Plus Hammock Fixing, which you can drill into the wall securely. If you want to give your hammock further flex, you can add a Sonos Fixing which will make it springier but is usually used for when hanging a chair from the cieling.

I only have one wall!!! That’s fine, all you need to do is attached one end of the hammock to a wall using the Easy Plus Hammock Fixing, and the other end to a Madera Post or build a new wall

Wooden posts or beams

Fixing a hammock into wood is easy and often customer choose to hang the hammock from beams on the roof, ones which run down the wall or even sink their own post in the groud with concrete to create a homemade post. A Jumbo Fixing should do the trick which is made especially for hanging your hammock from wooden posts or beams.

From ceiling

If you want to create a larger arch or hang a hammock chair, then you will need our Power Hook or Rotating Swivel Fixing which will suspend your hammock from a fixed point on the ceiling.

 



On a sailing boat

We sell lots of hammocks to customers that want to fix it to their boat, either below deck or on the masts/rigging. Thanks to all the cleats, ropes and bars on boats hanging a hammock should be easy.

Typically our customers hang hammocks/hanging chairs directly onto the boom between the overhaul and gooseneck. Some even swing the boom out, when anchored so they are hanging over the sea! Alternatively you can fix it to the mast and forward pulpit but with so many options we only ask that you consider your fixing with safety in mind.


If you are unsure you can always call the hammock experts (that’s us) on 01748 471 299

 

 

 

 

www.simplyhammocks.co.uk

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