How to ground an outlet – How to Ground a Wall Outlet

How to Ground a Wall Outlet

Outlets must be grounded to protect against accidental shocks. This is
even more important for outdoor outlets, since they are exposed to
water. Many cities require that outdoor outlets be of the GFCI (Ground
Fault Circuit Interrupt) type. These electrical fixtures will
automatically cut off if they detect current leakage, such as a frayed
cord sitting in a puddle of water. If you have an older two-prong
outlet on an outside wall, you can ground it by replacing it with a
three-prong GFCI outlet on an outside wall.Difficulty:Moderately
EasyInstructions Things You’ll Need
GFCI
outlet
Screwdriver
Needle-nose pliers
Electrical
tape
Waterproof outlet box

Home & Garden

Each of the holes in a standard 2-prong electrical outlet allows
access to a wire behind the outlet receptacle. The wider hole, usually
positioned on the right, connects to a black-coated wire providing the
power and is considered «hot.» The left hole connects to a white
ground to enable the electrical current to pass through the connected
electrical device safely. Junction Box Ground PanelThe ground wire
in a 2-hole outlet is connected to a ground panel in the junction box.
The white coated ground wire when connected to the junction ground
panel, allows the electrical ground current to safely pass from the
electrical device to the junction box.
GroundingTo ground the white
wire at the

Home & Garden

Ungrounded wall outlets, identifiable because they have only two prong
inlets, are commonly found in homes with older wiring. In 1962,
changes to the electrical code required grounding for all branching
electrical circuits, such as wall outlets. Creating a grounded circuit
from an ungrounded circuit is cumbersome, although not overly
difficult. Many homes still possess ungrounded wall outlets because of
this problem. Replacing a faulty ungrounded receptacle with another
ungrounded receptacle is allowed, and is the repair of choice for many
homeowners.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Screwdriver
Multimeter or voltmeter
class=»error»>Turn off the electrical

Home & Garden

Many older homes use two-prong wall outlets. A two-prong outlet does
not have a ground prong. Usually the metal box the 2-prong receptacle
mounts in connects to a ground source or a dedicated ground wire wraps
around the outlet’s mounting bracket. A three-prong outlet often wires
directly to a dedicated ground wire. A dedicated ground wire should
connect to a ground source in the circuit breaker’s service panel;
some older homes attach the ground wire to a copper plumbing pipe. A
three-prong outlet can replace a two-prong outlet in a grounded box or
if the box contains a ground wire.Difficulty:ChallengingInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Ohm meter
14-gauge wire
Flat-head screwd

Home & Garden

Three-prong outlets are outlets with a ground terminal screw that
allows the ground wire to be directly attached to the outlet, instead
of the outlet box. In the case of a short or power surge, electricity
flows back through the ground wire and not potentially through the
user’s body. Electrical building codes now dictate that three-prong
outlets be installed in homes instead of the older two-prong outlets,
and the installation process is a safe one if safety issues are
addressed.

Home & Garden

A GFCI or ground fault circuit interrupter is a type of outlet with
its own built-in circuit breaker. Normal circuit breakers interrupt
the flow of power if electricity flows too quickly through the circuit
for the wires to safely carry. Circuit breakers will protect you from
electrical fires in your walls, but can’t completely protect you from
the risk of electrocution. A GFCI, on the other hand, shuts off power
when electricity flows along a path to ground, such as through a pool
or a sink. This allows it to prevent electrocution, which is why GFCIs
are used in bathrooms, pools and other areas where water and
electricity are used in the same place. Although GFCIs will work
without groundin

Home & Garden

A ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle is designed to guard
against electrical shocks produced by a faulty appliance or a worn or
wet cord or plug. In the event of an electrical short, the receptacle
automatically shuts off the supply of electricity. GFCIs are commonly
used in wet locations such as bathrooms, garages and kitchens. Wiring
a GFCI is not much different than wiring a standard receptacle,
although with a GFCI, only the pair of screws next to the «line» half
of the receptacle are used. An existing outlet that does not feature a
ground plug can easily be replaced with a GFCI receptacle by adding a
single copper grounding wire.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll

Home & Garden

bighow.org

How to Ground an Ungrounded Outlet

Ground (or grounded) outlets in homes are either standard 120 -or GFCI
(Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) outlets that have the grounding
wire from the electrical supply cable attached to the ground terminal
screw on the back or side of the outlet. With regular outlets, if
there is an issue with a loose live wire touching any part of the
metal outlet box, the ground wire will receive the power and in turn
cause the circuit breaker to turn off. GFCIs have their own circuit
breaker, and will turn off if there is a power surge or problem
anywhere along the circuit.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Portable electrical appliance
class=»error»>Grounded Outle

Home & Garden

If you live in a really old house, you might have ungrounded
electrical outlets. These are outlets that have only two prongs in
them, as opposed to the three-pronged outlets, which have been
standard since the early 1960s. In addition to providing an added
measure of safety, grounded outlets are important to have as many
appliances like computers and microwaves have grounded plugs. If you
don’t have the three-pronged, grounded outlets, it’s a fairly simple
upgrade that you can do yourself.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Voltage tester
Screwdriver
3-pronged
grounded outlet
Electrical tape
Circuit analyzer
class=»error»>Go to your electrical box a

Home & Garden

Older homes have ungrounded outlets because grounded outlets were not
in use when the homes were built. Ungrounded outlets are easily
identified, as they have only two slots instead of the three slots
needed for a three-prong plug. Upgrading to a grounded outlet requires
a licensed electrician to install a ground wire from the load center.
However, there is an exception to doing a costly rewiring of the house
by using a ground fault circuit interrupter, or GFCI, outlet. You can
install a GFCI yourself and avoid the costly expense of hiring an
electrician to do the job.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll Need
Screwdriver
Needle-nose pliers
Lamp
class=»error»>Tu

Home & Garden

Household electrical outlets come in either 15- or 20-amp sizes, with
most outlets having a green grounding terminal screw on the side. The
ground wire is attached to this screw, and tightened into place. For
outlets with six wires entering into the wall box, the two ground
wires from the box are joined to a short section of ground wire using
a wire nut, with the other end of the short ground wire section
connecting to the green terminal screw. This is called pig-tailing. If
code permits, the ground wire is easily removed from the
outlet.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Hair dryer or lamp
Screwdriver

Turn the
power off to the outlet t

Home & Garden

Three-prong outlets are outlets with a ground terminal screw that
allows the ground wire to be directly attached to the outlet, instead
of the outlet box. In the case of a short or power surge, electricity
flows back through the ground wire and not potentially through the
user’s body. Electrical building codes now dictate that three-prong
outlets be installed in homes instead of the older two-prong outlets,
and the installation process is a safe one if safety issues are
addressed.

Home & Garden

Household receptacles are connected to standard 12/2 gauge electrical
wire and are either in the middle of a series of a receptacle circuit
(called «middle of run») or at the end of the circuit (called «end of
run»). Though each receptacle has one ground terminal connection on
its side, middle of run receptacles have two ground wires to connect
to it. Consequently, a new length of bare ground wire is attached to
the two existing ground wires with its other end then attaching to the
receptacle’s ground terminal.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll Need
Portable electrical appliance
Screwdriver
Ground
wire
Wire cutters
Long-nosed pliers

Turn o

Home & Garden

A ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle is designed to guard
against electrical shocks produced by a faulty appliance or a worn or
wet cord or plug. In the event of an electrical short, the receptacle
automatically shuts off the supply of electricity. GFCIs are commonly
used in wet locations such as bathrooms, garages and kitchens. Wiring
a GFCI is not much different than wiring a standard receptacle,
although with a GFCI, only the pair of screws next to the «line» half
of the receptacle are used. An existing outlet that does not feature a
ground plug can easily be replaced with a GFCI receptacle by adding a
single copper grounding wire.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll

Home & Garden

bighow.org

How to Ground a GFCI Outlet

Ground fault circuit interrupters are electrical outlets that trip a
breaker in the outlet itself if the GFCI detects a short or a fault in
the circuit’s ground. The rest of your electrical system will continue
to work, but you can’t use the plug with the GFCI until you correct
the fault and reset the breaker. Building codes dictate where you’ll
need to install GFCI outlets. Code RequirementsThe 2008
«National Electrical Code,» which most municipalities use,
requires GFCI outlets in all bathrooms, kitchens, garages and in any
outdoor receptacle — anywhere water might come in contact with the
electrical wiring. Even if you have no plumbing or water in your
basement, the code sti

Home & Garden

A GFCI, or ground fault circuit interrupter, is an electric outlet
that shuts off power to an electrical circuit to prevent electrocution
when a circuit suddenly goes to ground, as would happen if someone was
standing in water and touched a live wire. They’re particularly useful
in locations like bathrooms, kitchens or laundry rooms. It’s worth the
time to install a GFCI in place of regular outlets you may already
have installed.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Screwdriver

Turn off the power to the
circuit you’ll be working on. Never work on a live circuit.
Remove
the screw in the center of the outlet cover and pull the cover
off.

Home & Garden

A GFCI, or ground fault circuit interrupter, offers protection against
severe or fatal electric shocks and prevents electrical fires by
detecting ground faults. Installation of the device could prevent
thousands of injuries each year due to burn and electric shock. The
GFCI constantly monitors electricity flowing in a circuit. If the
current flowing differs by a small amount upon returning, the GFCI
quickly switches off power to the circuit. Although you may still
receive a shock, you should not receive a serious
injury.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Screwdriver
Electrical tape
Radio
class=»error»>Switch the breaker to the circuit off at the main ser

Home & Garden

The US Consumer Product Safety Commission states that if ground fault
circuit interrupters (GFCIs) were installed in residential circuits,
they could prevent over two-thirds of the electrocutions that happen
each year. It’s a good idea to occasionally troubleshoot your GFCI
outlet, as a mis-wired GFCI cannot protect you from electric shock,
and if the wrong wires are connected to the wrong terminal screws,
they cannot provide power to the GFCI or any other outlet on the
circuit.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Phillips or slotted screwdriver

Plug a
lamp into the ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) outlet and turn
it on.
Press the test bu

Home & Garden

Daisy-chaining electrical outlets is a common procedure in household
wiring. Outlets are designed with two pairs of terminals so you can
wire a live circuit—called the line—to one pair of terminals and
another outlet—called the load—to the second pair of terminals. When
you’re wiring a regular outlet, there is no difference when the load
is another standard outlet or a ground fault current interrupter
(GFCI) outlet. You must be careful, however, to connect the circuit
wires to the terminals marked «line» on the GFCI.Difficulty:Moderately
EasyInstructions Things You’ll Need
Electrical
box
Hammer
Screwdriver
Electrical cable
Utility
knife
Wire stripper
Pliers

Home & Garden

A ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle is designed to guard
against electrical shocks produced by a faulty appliance or a worn or
wet cord or plug. In the event of an electrical short, the receptacle
automatically shuts off the supply of electricity. GFCIs are commonly
used in wet locations such as bathrooms, garages and kitchens. Wiring
a GFCI is not much different than wiring a standard receptacle,
although with a GFCI, only the pair of screws next to the «line» half
of the receptacle are used. An existing outlet that does not feature a
ground plug can easily be replaced with a GFCI receptacle by adding a
single copper grounding wire.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll

Home & Garden

Since the mid to late 1970s, ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI)
devices have been required in all bathrooms and wet environments.
Later codes require these devices in crawl spaces, attics and
unfinished basements. If you have older outlets, or just wish to add
extra protection, changing out an old outlet for a GFCI outlet is a
very good choice.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Wire
cutter/stripper
GFCI outlet
GFCI outlet face plate
Circuit
tester

Turn off the power to the outlet you are
replacing. It is far better if you are able to turn off the power at
the breaker panel. Be certain to test t

Home & Garden

bighow.org

How to Ground an Outlet Using a Purchased Pigtail

You can put an additional electric outlet in without running cable
from the breaker box. A household breaker panel has incoming power
lines that carry over 240 volts. The incoming power cannot be turned
off, and the wires are exposed whenever the breaker panel cover is off
for installing new household wiring. The power running to a pigtail
light switch can supply an electrical receptacle. Use the appropriate
wiring scheme to run power to the new outlet.Difficulty:Moderately
ChallengingInstructions Things You’ll Need
Local electrical
codes
Romex 12/2 cable
Phillips screwdriver
Slotted
screwdriver
Utility knife
Electrical tape
Wire
cutters
Needle nose pliers
F

Home & Garden

Receptacles or outlets provide a power connection for our increasing
number of electrical devices. In North America they deliver 120 volts
at 15 amps of current. 14/3 gauge copper wire is used to connect them.
Installing a receptacle is easy if you know what each wire does. The
green wire is the ground connection and it is the backup safety
device. The white wire is the neutral connection and it provides the
path back to the distribution panel. The black wire is the hot
connection and it delivers the electricity to the
receptacle.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Non-contact voltage detector
Grounding power
tail
Outlet
Screwdriver
Wire strippers
Wire

Home & Garden

Three-prong outlets are outlets with a ground terminal screw that
allows the ground wire to be directly attached to the outlet, instead
of the outlet box. In the case of a short or power surge, electricity
flows back through the ground wire and not potentially through the
user’s body. Electrical building codes now dictate that three-prong
outlets be installed in homes instead of the older two-prong outlets,
and the installation process is a safe one if safety issues are
addressed.

Home & Garden

The electrical system in modern homes uses a three-prong grounded
outlet to provide power to 120-volt appliances. The purpose of the
ground is to provide protection to the user in the event the appliance
short-circuits or malfunctions. Harmful voltage follows the wiring to
the ground instead of flowing through to the user. In older homes,
outlets may use a two-prong ungrounded configuration that provides no
protection to the user. Properly grounding these outlets requires
running modern wires that are connected to the grounding bar inside
the service panel.Difficulty:Moderately ChallengingInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Flat screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Wire
strippers

Home & Garden

Electrical cables typically have two or three wires plus a ground
wire. If you have two or more cables in the same electrical box, all
of the ground wires need to be connected together. If the box is
metal, the box needs to be connected to a ground. Additionally, a
ground wire needs to be connected to the switch or outlet that will be
in the box. You do this with a pigtail. A pigtail is simply a piece of
wire attached to the other ground wires with a wire
nut.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Screwdrivers
Wire nuts
Extra wire
Lineman’s
pliers
Wire stripper
Utility knife

Cut each
of the cables so that they protrude six to eight inc

Home & Garden

A GFCI or ground fault circuit interrupter is a type of outlet with
its own built-in circuit breaker. Normal circuit breakers interrupt
the flow of power if electricity flows too quickly through the circuit
for the wires to safely carry. Circuit breakers will protect you from
electrical fires in your walls, but can’t completely protect you from
the risk of electrocution. A GFCI, on the other hand, shuts off power
when electricity flows along a path to ground, such as through a pool
or a sink. This allows it to prevent electrocution, which is why GFCIs
are used in bathrooms, pools and other areas where water and
electricity are used in the same place. Although GFCIs will work
without groundin

Home & Garden

A ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle is designed to guard
against electrical shocks produced by a faulty appliance or a worn or
wet cord or plug. In the event of an electrical short, the receptacle
automatically shuts off the supply of electricity. GFCIs are commonly
used in wet locations such as bathrooms, garages and kitchens. Wiring
a GFCI is not much different than wiring a standard receptacle,
although with a GFCI, only the pair of screws next to the «line» half
of the receptacle are used. An existing outlet that does not feature a
ground plug can easily be replaced with a GFCI receptacle by adding a
single copper grounding wire.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll

Home & Garden

bighow.org

How to Ground an Existing Electrical Outlet

Modern homes need an excellent grounding system to protect occupants
from deadly electrical faults and protect computers, electronics and
appliances from destructive electrical surges. The system which
grounds electrical outlets is a bare or green wire that runs along all
the household electrical circuits and connects all tools and
appliances to the service panel. The correct method for attaching an
electrical outlet to the grounding system varies depending on how many
cables enter the receptacle box and whether that box is plastic or
metal.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Screwdriver
Wire cutter/stripper
Pliers
Insulated
wire connector
Machine

Home & Garden

If you have an older home, you may need to install an extra outlet or
two at some point in time. Because of the popularity of modern
appliances and technology, extra electrical receptacles are generally
necessary in older homes that have not been rewired for modern
convenience. If you are a do-it-yourself type with such a home,
learning to add a new outlet is challenging but not impossible. As
long as you safely follow directions, you will have a new outlet in no
time.Difficulty:Moderately ChallengingInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Pencil
Electric Drill
3/4-inch Paddle Bit
Putty
Knife
Pry Bar
Screwdriver Set
New Electrical Box
Spools of
Black, White and Bare Wi

Home & Garden

Electrical outlets with an attached ground wire have two sets of
inlets on the front, with each set comprising of two slots (the
smaller slot is hot, the larger slot is neutral), and a hole below the
slots shaped like an upside down U, which is for ground. Testing a
grounded outlet requires the use of a battery operated circuit tester,
which has two prongs and a light. If a circuit is receiving power, the
tester’s light goes on, but if the circuit is not receiving power, or
if it is wired incorrectly, the light stays off.Difficulty:Moderately
EasyInstructions Things You’ll Need
Circuit tester
New
battery

Insert a new battery into the circuit
tester — the siz

Home & Garden

If you live in a really old house, you might have ungrounded
electrical outlets. These are outlets that have only two prongs in
them, as opposed to the three-pronged outlets, which have been
standard since the early 1960s. In addition to providing an added
measure of safety, grounded outlets are important to have as many
appliances like computers and microwaves have grounded plugs. If you
don’t have the three-pronged, grounded outlets, it’s a fairly simple
upgrade that you can do yourself.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Voltage tester
Screwdriver
3-pronged
grounded outlet
Electrical tape
Circuit analyzer
class=»error»>Go to your electrical box a

Home & Garden

There may come a time when you find it necessary to have electricity
available in a place where there is no existing electrical outlet.
Rather than running an extension cord to that spot, you decide that
you would like to install another electrical outlet there. With some
basic tools and the right parts, you can wire a new outlet from an
existing one in a few hours.Difficulty:Moderately
ChallengingInstructions Things You’ll Need
Tape measure
Stud
finder
Pencil
Outlet junction box
Safety glasses or
goggles
Drywall saw
Screwdriver
Circuit tester
Cable
connector
Electrical wire
Wire cutters
Cable ripper
Wire
stripper
Outlet
Lineman’s pliers

Home & Garden

A ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle is designed to guard
against electrical shocks produced by a faulty appliance or a worn or
wet cord or plug. In the event of an electrical short, the receptacle
automatically shuts off the supply of electricity. GFCIs are commonly
used in wet locations such as bathrooms, garages and kitchens. Wiring
a GFCI is not much different than wiring a standard receptacle,
although with a GFCI, only the pair of screws next to the «line» half
of the receptacle are used. An existing outlet that does not feature a
ground plug can easily be replaced with a GFCI receptacle by adding a
single copper grounding wire.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll

Home & Garden

Ground an electrical outlet with no grounding wire by installing a
Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) receptacle. The National
Electric Code (NEC) allows three prong GFCI outlets to exclude ground
wires due to the built-in breaker switch that trips at the indication
of a short. An electrician may insist on grounding a GFCI during
installation, but it is not required for most applications. A GFCI
without ground wiring is not considered safe for computers or
microwave ovens, but it will accommodate all other household
electrical items.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Voltage tester or night light
Slotted
screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Tape
Wire cu

Home & Garden

bighow.org

How to Ground a 3 Prong Outlet

In many older homes in the United States, the outlets are of the
two-prong variety. Since two-pronged outlets are not grounded, it is
essential to replace these receptacles with three-pronged versions.
The grounded outlets are safer and more capable of protecting modern
electronics like computer equipment, televisions and
more.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Three-pronged outlets
Screwdrivers
Wire
strippers
Voltage tester
Electrical tape
Grounding wire
class=»error»>Turn off the power to the two-prong outlets you plan to
replace.
Remove the outlet’s cover plate and unscrew the two screws
that secure the outlet to the box.
Carefully pull

Home & Garden

Outlets must be grounded to protect against accidental shocks. This is
even more important for outdoor outlets, since they are exposed to
water. Many cities require that outdoor outlets be of the GFCI (Ground
Fault Circuit Interrupt) type. These electrical fixtures will
automatically cut off if they detect current leakage, such as a frayed
cord sitting in a puddle of water. If you have an older two-prong
outlet on an outside wall, you can ground it by replacing it with a
three-prong GFCI outlet on an outside wall.Difficulty:Moderately
EasyInstructions Things You’ll Need
GFCI
outlet
Screwdriver
Needle-nose pliers
Electrical
tape
Waterproof outlet box

Home & Garden

Each of the holes in a standard 2-prong electrical outlet allows
access to a wire behind the outlet receptacle. The wider hole, usually
positioned on the right, connects to a black-coated wire providing the
power and is considered «hot.» The left hole connects to a white
ground to enable the electrical current to pass through the connected
electrical device safely. Junction Box Ground PanelThe ground wire
in a 2-hole outlet is connected to a ground panel in the junction box.
The white coated ground wire when connected to the junction ground
panel, allows the electrical ground current to safely pass from the
electrical device to the junction box.
GroundingTo ground the white
wire at the

Home & Garden

If your Kenmore electric dryer doesn’t turn on or turns of abruptly
during a cycle then you may have a faulty power cable causing the
problem. In some instances the power cable may need to be changed from
a three-prong connector to a four-prong connecter if the wall outlet
near your dryer only supports four-prong connections. A four-prong
connection also will provide your dryer with a more reliable source of
power than a three-prong connection.Difficulty:EasyInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Philips screwdriver

Move
your Kenmore electric dryer away from the wall and then disconnect the
three-prong cable from the wall outlet.
Remove the screws on the
cover panel

Home & Garden

Two-prong outlets are generally no longer accepted by electrical
building code regulations, and for the sake of safety should be
replaced with grounded three-prong outlets. The three-prong outlet has
a green-colored grounding terminal on its side, and like all terminal
connections must have only one wire attached to it. Consequently, in
the case of outlet boxes with two incoming ground wires, a new section
of ground wire is connected to the outlet, with its other end joined
to the existing ground wires.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll Need
Screwdriver
Ground wire
Tape measure
Wire
cutters
Wire nut
Long-nose pliers

Turn off
the circuit

Home & Garden

The National Electrical Code (NEC) requires all new 220-volt
appliances be connected with four wires: two for hot, one for neutral
and one for ground. Some older 220-volt appliances are grounded
through the neutral wire, though, so they have only three terminals.
The home electrician who wants to wire an older appliance, such as a
dryer or stove, to a four-prong outlet has to figure out what to do
with the ground wire on a four-wire cord. The solution is to attach it
to the ground screw after disconnecting the ground plate, or attach it
directly to the body of the appliance.Difficulty:EasyInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Screwdriver
4-prong electrical cord
Drill
(optional)

Home & Garden

If your dryer isn’t properly grounded, you can get a shock if the
wires come loose or a connection inside fails. Under certain
conditions, this shock could be lethal. To prevent this, 240-volt
dryer circuits have to have a separate ground wire. This requirement
wasn’t adopted until 1991, so dryers in use before that time don’t
have a ground terminal. To plug your older dryer into a grounded
circuit, you have to replace the old three-prong cord with one that
has four prongs and connect the ground wire to the body of the
appliance.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions Things You’ll
Need
Phillips screwdriver
Drill
Drill bit
Ground
screw

Remove the termina

Home & Garden

bighow.org

How to Reset a Ground Outlet

Electrical outlets with an attached ground wire have two sets of
inlets on the front, with each set comprising of two slots (the
smaller slot is hot, the larger slot is neutral), and a hole below the
slots shaped like an upside down U, which is for ground. Testing a
grounded outlet requires the use of a battery operated circuit tester,
which has two prongs and a light. If a circuit is receiving power, the
tester’s light goes on, but if the circuit is not receiving power, or
if it is wired incorrectly, the light stays off.Difficulty:Moderately
EasyInstructions Things You’ll Need
Circuit tester
New
battery

Insert a new battery into the circuit
tester — the siz

Home & Garden

Each of the holes in a standard 2-prong electrical outlet allows
access to a wire behind the outlet receptacle. The wider hole, usually
positioned on the right, connects to a black-coated wire providing the
power and is considered «hot.» The left hole connects to a white
ground to enable the electrical current to pass through the connected
electrical device safely. Junction Box Ground PanelThe ground wire
in a 2-hole outlet is connected to a ground panel in the junction box.
The white coated ground wire when connected to the junction ground
panel, allows the electrical ground current to safely pass from the
electrical device to the junction box.
GroundingTo ground the white
wire at the

Home & Garden

Three-prong outlets are outlets with a ground terminal screw that
allows the ground wire to be directly attached to the outlet, instead
of the outlet box. In the case of a short or power surge, electricity
flows back through the ground wire and not potentially through the
user’s body. Electrical building codes now dictate that three-prong
outlets be installed in homes instead of the older two-prong outlets,
and the installation process is a safe one if safety issues are
addressed.

Home & Garden

Grounding a wall outlet is an easy do-it-yourself project if the
electrical wiring in your house is one of two types: armored cable
installed in metal boxes or the newer non-metallic (NM) cable
installed in plastic boxes. Armored cable maintains ground through the
metal boxes and coiled metal casing. The coiled metal casing acts as a
third wire that grounds the metal boxes. NM cable has an additional
ground wire inside the sheathing that grounds at the breaker box.
Unfortunately, if your home uses the oldest type of wiring that
contains only two wires and no coiled casing, it is probably time to
call a professional electrician.Difficulty:Moderately EasyInstructions
Things You’ll Need

Home & Garden

The electrical system in modern homes uses a three-prong grounded
outlet to provide power to 120-volt appliances. The purpose of the
ground is to provide protection to the user in the event the appliance
short-circuits or malfunctions. Harmful voltage follows the wiring to
the ground instead of flowing through to the user. In older homes,
outlets may use a two-prong ungrounded configuration that provides no
protection to the user. Properly grounding these outlets requires
running modern wires that are connected to the grounding bar inside
the service panel.Difficulty:Moderately ChallengingInstructions
Things You’ll Need
Flat screwdriver
Phillips screwdriver
Wire
strippers

Home & Garden

A GFCI or ground fault circuit interrupter is a type of outlet with
its own built-in circuit breaker. Normal circuit breakers interrupt
the flow of power if electricity flows too quickly through the circuit
for the wires to safely carry. Circuit breakers will protect you from
electrical fires in your walls, but can’t completely protect you from
the risk of electrocution. A GFCI, on the other hand, shuts off power
when electricity flows along a path to ground, such as through a pool
or a sink. This allows it to prevent electrocution, which is why GFCIs
are used in bathrooms, pools and other areas where water and
electricity are used in the same place. Although GFCIs will work
without groundin

Home & Garden

A ground-fault circuit-interrupter receptacle is designed to guard
against electrical shocks produced by a faulty appliance or a worn or
wet cord or plug. In the event of an electrical short, the receptacle
automatically shuts off the supply of electricity. GFCIs are commonly
used in wet locations such as bathrooms, garages and kitchens. Wiring
a GFCI is not much different than wiring a standard receptacle,
although with a GFCI, only the pair of screws next to the «line» half
of the receptacle are used. An existing outlet that does not feature a
ground plug can easily be replaced with a GFCI receptacle by adding a
single copper grounding wire.Difficulty:ModerateInstructions Things
You’ll

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