How to get a cat – How to Get a Cat Used to a New Puppy

How to Get a Cat Used to a New Puppy

Cats and dogs can get along if introduced properly.

You love your new puppy, but your cat may not. First impressions can make or break the future relationship between your existing cat and your new addition. While these two may not become best buds, with a slow, gentle introduction and continued positive reinforcement, they may at least cohabitate peacefully.

Confine the new puppy to a room in your home for the first day or two, allowing your cat to roam freely in the house. The cat was there first and shouldn’t be made to feel like the new arrival is in any way disturbing her routine. Doing so could make your kitty view the pup’s arrival as a type of punishment. You never want either animal to associate the other with anything negative — keep all interactions and impressions positive.

When taking your pup out to potty, you may want to lure your cat to another room or high perch to keep any initial interactions to a minimum. Keep your pup on a leash.

Lure your cat over to the closed door of the puppy’s room with treats and praise. Allow the cat to smell the puppy under the door and vice versa. This gives the animals each other’s scents, something that is important to both cats and dogs. To help this process along, rub a towel on your puppy and leave it next to your cat’s favorite place to sit so she can inspect and smell it regularly. Do the same with the cat and let the puppy smell the towel with the cat’s scent.

Continue this stage of getting each animal used to the other, until neither reacts to the scent of the other with signs of aggression, including hissing, lunging, snapping and growling. This process could take a few days or a few weeks. Don’t rush, take the process as slowly as possible to prevent upsetting either animal.

Barking is not necessarily a sign of aggression on its own, although it may scare your cat. This is just your dog’s way of trying to communicate with her, unless it is accompanied with growling and the urge to chase her.

Place a baby gate in front of the door to the dog’s room and open the door to the room. Let the cat and pup see and smell each other through the gate. Hand treats to each animal to positively reinforce the experience. This way, each animal will begin to associate the other with the presence of yummy treats and to look forward to potential interaction.

While either may show signs of aggression, such as hissing or growling, ignore this behavior. Reward calm interaction, curiosity or indifference. Don’t try to discourage aggressive behaviors by yelling at either animal because they won’t understand and will simply associate yelling — something bad — with the presence of the other animal. Continue to separate the animals with the baby gate until no signs of aggression persist. Again, this can take a few days or a couple of weeks.

Teach your pup some basic obedience commands like «sit,» «stay» and «leave it.» These commands allow you to control your dog during his interactions with your cat. Basic commands like these are easy for most puppies to learn. Teach the «sit» command by saying the command to your dog and holding a treat above your dog’s nose until he sits. Reward and treat him, repeating the procedure until he obeys.

The «stay» command is an extension of the «sit» command; tell your dog to sit, then say «stay» and move away from your dog. Reward and treat him if he stays put and increase the distance between you and your dog for each repetition.

The «leave it» command involves placing a treat or favorite toy in front of your dog after having him «sit» and then «stay» — if he ignores the treat for a period of time, he gets a treat and reward. A leash can be helpful in teaching this command to keep him from accessing the treat or toy.

Clip your cat’s nails to prevent her from scratching your puppy out of fear, which can hurt your little pup and mar the relationship between the two. Work with a human nail clipper or one specific for pets, and distract your cat with treats while you clip off the very tips of the nails. Avoid the pink quick, which contains blood vessels and can cause pain if cut into.

If you don’t feel comfortable clipping your cat’s nails, take your cat to a veterinarian or groomer, who can do it for you.

Exercise your pup with a fun round of games and outdoor exercise to tire him out. Bring your dog inside and keep him on his leash. Sit with your pup calmly and let your cat come to you. Let the little furballs observe each other and reward positive or indifferent interactions with plenty of treats and praise for everyone.

Allow your cat to have an escape route during this initial introduction — a path that she can run from the dog and jump up to a higher surface that the pup can’t get to.

If you notice that your pup is acting aggressively by trying to grab or nip the cat, command him to «leave it» and gently bring him away on the leash.

Allow the two animals to meet without using a leash on your pup if interactions show no signs of aggression. Supervise the meetings closely and continue to praise and treat the animals. Continue to supervise interactions for the first month or so, the American Humane Association recommends. When you are not home to watch your furbabies, place the animals into different portions of the home, either in separate rooms or with a baby gate to separate the upstairs from the downstairs.

Maintain a positive attitude when with your cat and puppy; animals can pick up any nervousness or tension you have, and it may affect the relationship between them. Continue to treat and praise both your cat and your dog occasionally as they become used to each other’s presence, and behave calmly. In time, you may even find the little guys snuggled together, but don’t have unrealistic expectations — if they merely tolerate each other with indifferent interactions, that’s OK too.

Items you will need

  • Leash
  • Towels
  • Baby gate
  • Cat treats
  • Dog treats
Tips
  • Ask the shelter, rescue or breeder if the puppy has been raised around cats; pups that have previous experience with cats tend to behave better around them than those that don’t.
  • Provide your cat with at least two litter boxes in locations that are easy for her to access without being bothered by the puppy, otherwise you may end up with a cat who eliminates in undesired locations in your home.
  • Exercise your puppy daily, especially as he heads into adulthood. This burns off extra energy, keeps him healthy and prevents behavioral problems when he interacts with your cat.
  • Provide a high surface for your cat to have as an escape, such as a series of cat perches along the wall. Your pup, even as an adult, won’t be able to reach these and your cat can have a «safe» spot all her own.
Warnings
  • Certain dogs have a high prey drive, meaning that they enjoy chasing moving objects, including cat. Dogs can injure or even kill them, depending on how large they become in adulthood. Inquire with the shelter or breeder about the pup’s personality, and disclose that you have a cat at home already to see if the pup has a tendency toward a higher prey drive.
  • While most dogs and cats can exist peacefully together, especially if they are younger when introduced, sometimes the relationship just isn’t meant to be. In cases where you see your dog acting aggressively toward the cat with no abatement over time, you may want to think about re-homing one of the little guys.

«;

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How to Get a Cat to Sleep in its Own Bed

If you have a cat at home, then it is no secret that these animals, as well as being beautiful and good company, are also dominant beings. In some cases, they can even be capricious, so from the outset it is necessary to establish some ground rules.

It is very common to hear complaints from cat owners about how their pet wakes them up in the middle of the night or just refuses to sleep in their own bed.

That is why AnimalWised want to present some tips on how to get a cat to sleep in its own bed, so that you can make your pet understand that your space is your space.

Why does my cat not want to sleep in their bed?

Cats are independent animals that spend about fifteen hours a day sleeping, so it is not strange that they change places to rest and explore new areas where they can sleep comfortably.

However, many cat owners would prefer that they sleep in the beds they have purchased for them. Mainly to prevent them from taking naps on furniture, tables and their own beds!

In principle, you should understand that if your cat does not want to sleep in their own bed this does not mean that they don’t like it. Yet, other surfaces available may have what felines are looking for when they choose a space to rest: warmth, comfort and safety.

That’s why some cats choose their sleeping place on furniture or tables, or even on your bed. In the first two cases, the decision is often related to the comfort of these spaces and even the height they provide, as cats feel more secure when they sleep in high places that protect them from «predators.»

If they want to sleep in your bed, this may indicate deeper reasons:

  • The cat feels safe with you, so looks for your protection at bedtime.
  • They consider you part of their pack, so sleeping near you is normal, since that’s how they rest.
  • They prefer the height of your bed, because it gives superiority to them against possible threats.
  • They are looking after your body heat, because the temperature of your body goes down while you sleep.
  • They miss you, especially if you spend a lot of time away from home, so they take advantage of this time to be close to you.

Despite these reasons, many cat owners prefer that their pet does not sleep on cushions and much less with them. Either because they cause allergies, because their partner doesn’t like it, for hygiene reasons or simply because the cat is so active at night that they cannot sleep.

Check out our article on why cats like sleeping at your feet.

Choose the right bed

The first step for your cat to sleep in their own bed is to choose the right one for them. From the moment you know you will bring your cat home, it is necessary that you select a space to place their bed and get a box or basket to act as a cat bed.

Whether you buy or prepare one, you have to take into account some factors:

  • Size: Cats need space to turn around and stretch, so you should provide enough room for your cat to do this. But, without the bed becoming too large as they will not like it either. The idea is that they can stretch but at the same time feel protected in it.
  • Hygiene: get a bed that is easy to wash, to eliminate odors, hair and bacteria that could cause infections.
  • The material: some beds are made of wool and others come filled with foam, but the truth is that there are many models and materials. You should choose one that is comfortable for your cat considering the place where the bed will be (to know if it should be more sheltered or cooler). And the climate, because there are even thermal cushions to protect it in times of cold.
  • The shape: you can find open beds, high beds, cushions and small caves, so you should observe the tastes and habits of your cat to choose the right one. If they prefer to sleep stretched out, a spacious bed will be ideal. If, on the other hand, they like to dominate space, a high bed or even a cushion placed on a shelf is what they are looking for. If they prefer to hide when asleep, then you should buy a soft cave.

The most important thing is that you understand that your cat should feel comfortable and safe when using their bed. However, if after choosing the ideal bed they do not want to use it, follow the following tips to motivate them.

How to get your cat to sleep in its bed

If you have decided that the cat should sleep in their bed, training for this should begin from the moment the cat comes home. However, if you already have an adult feline and want to team them to use their bed, it is also possible. Patience is key.

  • Place their bed in a fixed place in the house, preferably in a corner where the cat is used to sleeping. If your animal prefers it well and the weather allows, look for a warm place.
  • If they like to sleep up high, get a bed with a stand or place it on a shelf or chair. Make sure they have adequate support to prevent accidents.
  • In the hours they are awake, take advantage to play with them and tire them out, so they feel exhausted during the night. Never wake them from their daytime nap though.
  • If they do not want to climb into their bed, keep the bedroom door closed at night, regardless of the animal’s meows so you open. If they insist and do not go to sleep, put them on their bed and give them pats and affection. Repeat this for several days in a row.
  • To make them feel more comfortable, you can leave an item on their bed that smells of you, this way the cat will feel safe.
  • When you notice that they enter their bed on their own accord, caress and praise their behavior so that they realize being there is good.
  • Avoid giving them too much food before going to sleep, as this will only make them hyperactive. A light dinner and a small session of games is the best thing for a placid dream.
  • To avoid them climbing onto your bed and other spaces where they should not sleep, try to generate some unpleasant sound when climbing to those places, either with a rattlesnake toy or a few coins. This will link the place to that sound. Assure they cannot tell it is you making the annoying noise, because then it will not work.
  • Never mistreat an animal or use violence to try and educate them.

With patience and love you will see how these tips will make your cat sleep in their own bed after repeating them for several days. Of course, you must be firm in your attempts, because a moment of weakness will only confuse them.

Always remember that a healthy cat, with all their vaccines and veterinary exams up to date, cannot transmit any disease even if they sleep next to you.

If you want to read similar articles to How to Get a Cat to Sleep in its Own Bed, we recommend you visit our Basic education category.

www.animalwised.com

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How to Get an Older Cat to Accept a New Kitten

«Why is he here?»

Bringing a new baby home is always troublesome — no matter if the baby is human or furry. Getting your older cat to accept the newcomer can also be problematic, but that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. A bit of patience and a trick or two is all it takes.

Give the older cat places to hide from the new terror. Kittens are adorable — but they are also annoying little creatures. They’ll probably see the older cat as a new playmate — although chances are the older resident won’t agree. Make sure you provide a chance for your cat to get away when the kitten gets to be too much. This could be done in the form of open doors to other rooms or high furniture that a tiny kitten cannot jump onto just yet.

Let them work it out in their own terms by taking it slowly. If you have an aggressive older cat and are worried, keep the kitty in a separate room for a while and just let the old resident to get used to the scent — through the closed door — at first. You can open the door after a couple of days, when both felines look and act more relaxed. Keep the interactions under control at first. For example, only allow the cats to be together when you’re home to supervise. If you’re leaving, lock them in separate areas of the house.

Set up an additional litter box in a separate area of the house. Many cats don’t like to share litter boxes, especially if they’ve been the only users for a long time. Show the new kitten the litter box he’s supposed to use, but let him explore and try to use the other one as well. Some hissing is normal when cats are getting to know each other — and especially if the older cat is trying to set some limits and rules. As long as no fights break out, the rest is just negotiation taking place.

Give your older cat a lot of attention. Tons of it. One of the reasons he’ll resent the newcomer is that he might feel displaced, so your job is to show him that he’s still No. 1 in your life. If he likes to cuddle with you, make sure he’s still able to without the kitten jumping all over him. If you need to sequester the new kitten in a different room to get quality time with your older cat, do so.

Tip
  • An adult cat is more likely to accept a kitten of the opposite sex because he won’t feel his position of «top cat» compromised. So if you have a choice, consider bringing a kitten to complete a couple — just make sure both cats are fixed or you’ll end up dealing with a completely different set of problems.

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Adopt-a-Pet.com Blog How to Get an Unwilling Cat Into a Carrier

Many cats have only bad associations with that horrible plastic and metal torture device humans call a cat carrier. “You capture me, put me in a noisy moving terrifying car, then we end up at the vet! And you want me to go back in there?” Trying to get an unwilling cat into a cat carrier sometimes feels like you need to be a reverse houdini, or perhaps wear full body armor. While owned cats, if they’re lucky, may only have to get into a carrier once a year for their annual vet checkup, fostered cats very often have to endure the carrier and car trip torture once a week! Of course, it’s worth it for them to find a home. But amazingly even once-a-year cats can have a surprisingly good memory when the cat carrier comes out of storage – hey, where did the cat go? Telling him it’s for his own good won’t likely convince him (see illustrative photo above, of our foster cat George). So what can you do to get a carrier-phobic cat safely and as happily as possible into a cat carrier? Below is our technique after getting dozens of kittens and cats into carriers. These are not reconditioning or training tips, like leaving the carrier out, feeding your cat in the carrier, etc, which though effective, take time. These are how to get a cat into a carrier quickly, reducing the anxiety and potential injury for both humans and felines.

Our “burrito cat-into-carrier”  technique is meant for friendly, uninjured cats.

  1.  Ideally 24+ hours before you need to get the cat into the carrier, casually put the carrier in your bathroom. Do this while your cat is distracted by something, say eating, or someone playing with him, or when he’s sleeping.
  2. Position the carrier so the door is open & facing the ceiling. So for hard plastic carriers or crates, that would be standing on its end. This will let you take advantage of gravity and with plastic carriers, their slippery plastic sides. 
  3. Locate a lightweight bath towel that is big enough to wrap around your cat and contain all his legs/paws/claws, but not so big that wrapped around you cat you can’t get him through the carrier door. Put it in the bathroom too.
  4. Get the cat into the bathroom with you and the carrier. Depending on your cat, you may be able to pick him up and carry him in, or lure him in with food or a toy. Quickly close the door.
  5. Gently but confidently (as possible!), wrap the cat in it like a burrito in the towel with only their head sticking out. You may not get this right the first time! You need to wrap and hold the towel securely enough so the cat doesn’t escape, but obviously not so tight that you are hurting them or inhibiting their breathing. 
  6. Putting the tail end in first (so the cat doesn’t see he’s being put into the carrier), lower the burrito cat into the carrier, and swiftly shut the door. Do NOT worry about unwrapping the towel, they will unwrap themselves.

Learn more about Jennifer, our blog author at Google+

Voila! You now have your cat in a carrier! Did you like this article? Click an icon below to share it on Facebook, Twitter, and more!


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Top 10 Tips — How Do I Get My Cat to Use Their Scratching Post?

In this article, I explain exactly how to get your cat to use their scratching post. All the best and most reliable tips are amalgamated into one place, right here.

It can be very frustrating when you go out and buy your cat a scratching post but they continue to scratch the furniture. «Why won’t my cat use their scratching post!?» I hear you cry. 

You can stop worrying now because I am here to share with you my top 10 tips on how to get your cat to use their scratching post and soon this dilemma will be a thing of the past.

At the same time as training your cat to use their scratching post, it may also be necessary to discourage and prevent them from scratching what they are not meant to. If you need help with this then I recommend that you also read my article on how to stop your cat scratching the furniture or carpet, which provides useful tips on how to protect your home from sharp claws. 

So… how do you encourage your cat to use their scratching post? 


1. Start during kittenhood. Of course, this tip may be a little redundant for some, unless you have a time-machine, but it is best to introduce your cat to their scratching post while they are still a kitten, or as young as possible. It’s much easier to teach a desirable behaviour from the beginning, rather than try to modify an undesirable behaviour later on. Since cats often stick with the same scratching object, when taking a new cat or kitten home it may also be a good idea to kindly ask to take the scratching post they are currently using as well, if it is appropriate to do so. It will also serve as a familiar object for them to have in their new home.  


2. The correct height. One of the reasons cats like to scratch is so that they can stretch their spines. Make sure you get a tall scratching post that they can use to really reach up and stretch out on. If the scratching post is short and awkward they may not use it. 


3. Make sure the post is secure. Is the scratching post sturdy or does it move around when they use it? Either secure the scratching post down, buy one with a sturdy base or buy one that is large and heavy enough to not move when they use it. Not many cats will enjoy using a scratching post that doesn’t offer them any resistance when they use it and just wobbles around. 

Cat trees are big, heavy and sturdy. They also provide excellent 
environmental enrichment. Go Pet Club Cat Trees are my favourite 
and you may be surprised by the low prices found on Amazon. 


4. Try different textures. You can buy scratching posts and pads made from different materials, such as:
Sisal and corrugated cardboard tend to be the most popular choices amongst the feline community. Some behaviourists also discourage using carpet posts as they believe it can be confusing for the cat. However, each circumstance is unique and every cat is an individual and will have their own personal preference. Perhaps your cat doesn’t like the texture you have chosen for them and they would prefer to try something new. 

The Catit Style Scratcher is made of corrugated cardboard. It is low cost
and even comes with a bag of catnip! It is a popular 5-star item on Amazon.



5. Try different angles. Different cats prefer different angles. Some like to scratch and stretch out on a horizontal surface, some prefer to reach up on a vertical surface, while others prefer something in between. You can try:

 


6. Imitate what they are currently scratching. If you are not sure what scratching post your cat would prefer then try to imitate what they are currently choosing to scratch. Pay attention to what texture and angle they seem to prefer. If they like to scratch the carpet you could try a horizontal scratcher, or if they prefer to scratch the walls, you could try a vertical scratcher. The SmartCat Bootsie’s Scratcher is a brilliant invention as it’s angle can be varied according to your cat’s preferences and either be laid flat on the floor or rested against the wall. 

  

The SmartCat Bootsie’s Scratcher is high-quality and affordable.
It can be laid flat on the floor or against a wall as it has rubber feet to 
stop it sliding. Alternatively, it can be permanently secured to the wall.

7. The ‘1 each plus 1’ rule. For every cat you have in your home you should have one scratching post, then you should have an extra scratching post on top of that. Scratching is a way of cats marking their territory in order for them to feel secure. If there is only one post and it has already been marked by one of your cats, the others may not use it and will choose to mark other places in the house instead, such as your sofa.    

8. Placement is key. One of the reasons a cat scratches is because they are marking their territory, therefore don’t hide scratching posts out of the way, not at first anyway. They need to be in more prominent locations so, for now, place them in the spots where they are currently choosing to scratch. You can move them somewhere more discrete once they are consistently using them. Also, do they have a spot where they like to nap? You can put a scratching post there too as cats often like to have a scratch when they wake up from a snooze. Another good location to try is next to the door that leads outside as it may be perceived as territory boundary.   


9. Make it a positive experience. When you introduce your cat to their new scratching post try placing delightful treats, such as Friskies Party Mix, on and around it as well as rubbing irresistible catnip over it to peak their interest. You can get no-mess catnip spray formulations, such as KONG Naturals Catnip Spray, and shower their scratcher in potent catnip oil.  

You can also try using fishing-rod-type cat toys, such as the Cat Charmer or Da Bird, to play with them on and around the scratching post. Encourage them to pounce on the toy so that their claws land on the post. They’ll soon realise how good it feels to sink their claws into. Whenever they are using their scratching post tell them what a good kitty they are!

I also recommend using positive reinforcement and clicker training techniques to teach your cat to use their scratching post. Clicker training can be an easy, inexpensive and fun way to teach your cat to use their scratching post. It is also an excellent way to spend some bonding time with your cat. To learn how to clicker train your cat I recommend investing in a positive reinforcement behavior book, such as Naughty No More by Marilyn Krieger. 


10. Rub their paws on their scratching post. As long as doing so doesn’t upset your cat, you can gently rub their paws on their post while giving them lots of praise. The main benefit of doing this is that it leaves some of the secretions from their paw scent glands on the post, which will hopefully encourage them to scratch it next time they get the scratching urge. 

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