How to do origami – how to articles from wikiHow

How to do origami the right way

If you’re here to learn how to do origami, you’ve come to the right place. Origami is the art of paper folding and on this page, you will get the chance to fold many amazing models. Although it looks difficult, rest assured that I’ve provided very easy to follow instructions. The suggested way to learn is to start with the easy models, then progress to the more difficult ones. When you’re ready, just select a model below to begin.

Wait! Before you begin, you’ll need paper. Using the right kind of origami paper will do wonders for your origami. It is easier to fold with and the end result looks a lot better than regular printer/copy paper. Before you commit to obtaining these paper, let’s learn how to do origami with regular paper to see if this is a hobby you will enjoy.

Easy Origami

Origami Animals

Origami Birds

Origami Boxes

Origami Flowers

Origami Hearts

Origami Stars

Origami Toys

Paper Airplanes

Dart
Difficulty: Easy

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Spy Plane
Difficulty: Easy

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Pet Dragon
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Headhunter
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Hammer
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Flying Ninja
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Pteroplane
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Swashbuckler
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Professional
Difficulty: Medium

Airtime

Speed

Distance

Stunts

Hope you enjoyed learning how to do origami. Bookmark this page and share with your friends!

www.origamiway.com

Origami Instructions — Instructions on How to Make Origami

Are you looking for origami instructions?  You’ve come to the right place!  Here you’ll find out how to make many kinds of neat and ingenious items. Our instructions consists of actual photographs of the folding process to help you along. 

 

Did you know that origami came from the Japanese words «Oru» meaning «to fold» and «kami» meaning «paper»? And that’s exactly what we do here — fold paper!

There’s nothing quite like the joy you get from transforming a plain square piece of paper into a container, animal, flower, etc.

It still puts a smile on our faces when we complete an origami!

 

Follow our instructions to make something today, right now!

Origami is fun, easy, inexpensive and great for sharing with others.  This is an activity that has been passed on from one generation to another, despite huge technological advances.

Let’s make sure that it will continue on for many generations to come.

Below is a video of one of the coolest origami we folded lately, the Magic Rose Cube, a model by Valerie Vann.

Origami Magic Rose Cube Assembly Video

 

 

 

Here is a collection of origami made by readers of this site!

Origami Photos Jan 2013

 

Below are some of the lovely comments we’ve received from visitors to our site. They keep us motivated!




Thanks so much for compiling instructions like these. It’s so much fun and incredibly helpful to have everything I’d ever want to make here on this site. And the fact that you reply to comments and interact with the people using your site is awesome and really shows your care and dedication. Thanks (for everything)! :)

(Feb 2013)




you are changing the art form of origami by making it so much more accessible. i mean it — for years have looked for projects to do that were advanced novice and had trouble with instructions not being clear enough to follow or with designs of projects not being interesting enough to pursue. you CONQUER both. thank you SINCERELY
(Nov 2012)




I know I’ve said this be4 but ur website is totally AWESOME!!!! And I was also wondering if u could put this message somewhere on the homepage just so everyone can see how crazy-cool this site is! Thanks SO much whoever u are for putting ur time into this and listening to whenever I bother u because I don’t understand a part…thanks!
(March 2012)




Many thanks for your website : it’s a real great job !

(Dec 2011)




Hello, I was a complete beginner to Origami before I came across your website, and successfully used your excellent instructions to create an easy elephant, a shark, a bat, and then a heron within a couple of hours! So, I’d like to say thanks very much, creating some impressive Origami animals was a nice relaxing diversion, surprisingly fun and satisfying.
(Dec 2011)




First off i just want to say that i LOVE your site! I haven’t found a site with this good of origami instructions yet! I love that you have step-by-step instructions and photos to go along. The photos help me a TON! If i don’t understand the instructions i can just look a the picture to help me along. I never thought I could do origami and I never even thought about trying. I thought that origami would be too hard for me, but since i found this site I realized that is so untrue! Ever since I found this I have been making origami and the assortment is growing by the week! I could write about how much I love this site forever but I think this is enough. I hope you keep on adding new origami because I’m almost through with these! I love this site but just a few of the instructions were a little bit hard for me to figure out but I’m in the groove now. I would like a little bit harder looking but easy doing origami though. Thank you SO much for creating this site! You really are spreading joy one fold at a time! I hope i will be uploading some pictures soon! Thanks again!
(Oct 2011)




I just wanted to write to tell you how much I love this site. Over the summer I had drivers education and had to go to work with my dad daily. I spent roughly six hours a day with him and I had nothing to do… that is until I realized there was an abundance of scrap paper laying around. I was then struck with the idea of doing origami, but didn’t know how to make anything. I jumped on the internet and found this amazing site. Now, not only have I found things to do all summer stuck in an office, but I have also found an amazing hobby. Thank you for this amazing website!

(July 2011)




i love your site so much. you guys helped me learn so much origami. 3 years ago i didn’t know what origami was and now i can’t live without it. thank you very much for making this site!

(May 2011)




I really enjoy your site. After I studied and made all of the origami base folds I was finally able to really understand what I was doing.
I always wanted to learn origami but the few times in my life that I tried I could not understand the instructions.
Learning how to make the base folds on your site changed my way of thinking and doing! Suddenly I understood. Finally I am able to fold origami animals and whatever I want.
Thank you for taking the time and effort to make this website possible. You have offered a little bit of joy to me and I am happy to receive it!(March 2011)

Hey i just wanted to say your website ROCKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (March 2011)

— Today i learnt origami for the first time. It made me happy….(Feb 2011)

— Just wanted to THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU!!! My grand-daughter’s 9th birthday arrived and she wanted money to buy clothes and
I was struggling to think of a way to make the gift of cash special when I remembered origami from 2nd grade lol! I made her the elephant and the shirt and a bow I knew how to make already,
which I did not see listed on your site. She was thrilled and touched and I think she will remember this birthday present better than a lot of others I have gotten her!
I have also used this for tips in restaraunts and have had waitresses tell me they KEPT THEM! How great that you have this site for people like me it was pretty easy,
even though my elephant looked like it had elephantitis lol! I will spread the word!(Feb 2011)

— I absolutely loved this! My friend was really down on Valentines Day, so i wrote her a nice letter and folded it into this heart. When she got it she loved it, and felt a lot better.
Thanks guys, you really made my friends day!(Feb 2011)

Awesome, now i can’t stop making them. thank you so much for the tutorial. your site is epic. i learned to do so much origami :)(Dec 2010)

Hello! I’m a BIG origami fan and even though I started about 1 year ago, I’ve made TONS of them! And I just wanted to say thanks for EVERYTHING! This is the best site because everything is clear and accurate 🙂 Thank you for everything!
(Dec 2010)

— I house-sat for a family friend this summer and decided to make them a few pieces of origami as a welcome home display on their entrance table: 3 vases on a lotus each, with 3 lilies and a crane each. Thanks so much for your fantastic instructions! It was just what I’ve been looking for—the best, clearest, easiest to understand instructions I’ve found! Keep up the good work! (Aug 2010)

— the first website i’ve found that doesn’t have rage-inducing instructions. thank you so much!(June 2010)

— I love this website I use it all the time! I am currently using the star box because I am in a wedding, not getting married, and I have to make about 100. I saw somebody said that they make 300 and I was awed! Now, I think I have changed my mind and put those chocolates in there with that fuzzy grass in it. Thank you so much. Also, I think that it’s a great idea to show the actual paper and not a diagram. It is so much more effective!
(Feb 2010)

— My niece brought me some origami paper from Japan for Christmas. Your site is the best one I’ve found for instructions, and I’m making my way through it! (Jan 2010)

— This was my project for our 2nd Year HS class. Thank you for the Origami tutorial. It made it easy for my class to follow and appreciate this Japanese art. We made the Origami Cube and will be making lots more within the week.
(Aug 2009)

— This is a great site! The photos are easy to follow and everything (: (April 2009)

— Amazing!!! I love ur site. I was looking up folding flapping crane that I’ve been trying to do on and off for 3 yrs or so. I’ve always wanted to fold the crane and looked up so many times. Even bought a few books here and there. Within minutes I connected to your site, I have already made 5 of them. THANK YOU.
(March 2009)




I never found the origami instruction as easy as you have them here. I love it. Thank you for your effort, time and for sharing this with all.

(April 2008)




I just wanted to say thank-you to whoever maintains this site. It is by far the best how-to site that I’ve found on the web. Good Job Guys! (Aug 2007)

 

 

www.origami-instructions.com

Origami for Kids Folding Instructions

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We use standard size 6 inch x 6 inch (15cm x 15cm) square origami paper for this site unless stated otherwise.
If you can, use different types of origami paper to change the look of the finished origami and have fun with it!

 

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For grownups, some of our fondest memories revolve around making origami as kids. Some of that simpler time can be captured by a little paper folding. Folding origami is also a great way for parents to spend quality time with kids without the need for any high tech gadget.

 

Folding origami gives parents a chance to sit down with kids and interact while creating something, and all without the noise of video games or tv programming.

Origami can also be taught in school as part of the curriculum.

Transforming a piece of plain paper into something else is an experience both adults and children can truly appreciate.

And best of all, they will remember the joy of folding origami as a kid even when they’re adults. I know I do!

The following origami designs are great for kids and beginners. Some are simple enough that young ones can make these with little or no help from grownups while others may require some assistance.

And if they’ve outgrown these origami for kids, then try something more challenging. There’s plenty of more difficult origami on this site as well.

 

 

 

We hope that you enjoy these origami for kids.  Let’s start folding!

 

www.origami-instructions.com

Show how to do origami

There is much speculation as to the origin of origami. It is generally believed that most of its modern developments occurred in Japan; however, there have also been independent paperfolding traditions in China much earlier, and in Germany and Spain, among other places. The earliest unambiguous refe…rence to a paper model is in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku in 1680 which describes paper butterflies in a dream. (Wikipedia).
For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. .
There is much speculation as to the origin of origami. It is generally believed that most of its modern developments occurred in Japan; however, there have also been independent paperfolding traditions in China much earlier, and in Germany and Spain, among other places. The earliest unambiguous reference to a paper model is in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku in 1680 which describes paper butterflies in a dream. (Wikipedia).
For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. .
There is much speculation as to the origin of origami. It is generally believed that most of its modern developments occurred in Japan; however, there have also been independent paperfolding traditions in China much earlier, and in Germany and Spain, among other places. The earliest unambiguous reference to a paper model is in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku in 1680 which describes paper butterflies in a dream. (Wikipedia).
For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. .
There is much speculation as to the origin of origami. It is generally believed that most of its modern developments occurred in Japan; however, there have also been independent paperfolding traditions in China much earlier, and in Germany and Spain, among other places. The earliest unambiguous reference to a paper model is in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku in 1680 which describes paper butterflies in a dream. (Wikipedia).
For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. .
There is much speculation as to the origin of origami. It is generally believed that most of its modern developments occurred in Japan; however, there have also been independent paperfolding traditions in China much earlier, and in Germany and Spain, among other places. The earliest unambiguous reference to a paper model is in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku in 1680 which describes paper butterflies in a dream. (Wikipedia).
For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. .
There is much speculation as to the origin of origami. It is generally believed that most of its modern developments occurred in Japan; however, there have also been independent paperfolding traditions in China much earlier, and in Germany and Spain, among other places. The earliest unambiguous reference to a paper model is in a short poem by Ihara Saikaku in 1680 which describes paper butterflies in a dream. (Wikipedia).
For the source and more detailed information concerning your request, click on the related links section (Wikipedia) indicated directly below this answer section. (MORE)

www.answers.com

How to Make Origami

If you are a beginner at paper folding and would like to learn how to make origami, then this site is for you! There are some great simple models for you to try, and some harder ones for when you get more confident, as well as all of the favourites: the Crane, Pelican, Lily, Butterfly…

Click Here for Origami Instructions

But let’s not get ahead of ourselves!

If you’re looking for a place to start, then start here: Find some paper! Very simple!

Any paper will do, you can use special origami paper if you like, or ordinary printer paper. Some models work better with origami paper, but most will look just as good with plain paper. And here’s a tip: If you have some, use gift wrapping paper.

Gift wrap comes in many thicknesses; so some might not be practical, but if you have some spare gift wrap, give it a try: you can get some beautiful effects from patterned paper, and most types are a little thinner than printer paper, which is a plus when you are learning how to make origami. It makes the folds easier, and the model stays intact better.

So let’s get started! First choose a model that you think you would like to make. Below are my recommendations for a starting model…

But before you go anywhere, please read some of these tips for better folding: they will make the folding easier, if you know these few things:

Origami Folding Tips

1. Fold each crease very well. Every crease needs to be flattened quite well for a successful model (unless of course the instructions tell you not to crease it well!) You can reinforce a crease by running the side of your thumbnail along the fold, or even use some sort of tool. I sometimes use the end of a plastic ruler, that works well without damaging the paper.

2. Follow the instructions. Every part of the instructions is important, so read each description carefully, and look at each picture closely. If you miss a piece of information, it could make the model more difficlt than it has to be!

3. Be patient. If you are just learning how to make origami, you have to realize that it is contemplative and relaxed activity, that is, you can’t go rushing through the instructions as fast as you can! It won’t take long for you to be very good at origami especially with the diagrams on this site, but when you are just starting give yourself a lot of time to work it out.

4. Have fun!

Okay, I’d like you to try one of these models first, and if you find them too easy, well, simply go on to a harder one! On the Origami Instructions page, there is a rating system so you can choose a more difficult model if you need to.

Origami Twirling Bird


Origami Triangle Box


Origami Hat

How to make origami: try folding some other models

www.origami-fun.com

How to Get Better at Origami, Advice from some of the Best Origami Artists

I decided to contact several origami experts to get advice about how to improve one’s skill with origami. I received a pretty good response so here is the advice I was given from several highly skilled origami artists.

I did edit some of these replies slightly to fix some grammar and spelling issues since not everyone I contacted spoke English as a first language.

“My advice is to meet other origamists in real life, preferably good ones, to fold with them and to learn from them. The first time I met another origamist I learned a lot. I spent one hour talking to him in his house, we didn’t even fold, but he showed me his works and he gave me advice about papers. Also, origami conventions are cool.”

-Juan Lopez Figueroa

Figuer on Deviant Art

 

This is more of a general tip, but i found it very rewarding to try out different forms of origami, like tessellations, modular and others. When i came back to do some representational folding, i found my skills were better. Though this might not work for people, it worked for me.  Also, Andrea’s Rose (diagrams on Alex Barber’s site) is great for improving neatness, I found.”

-Chris Hone

 

“Before you start designing, you should fold as many designs by others as you can. Pay close attention to every fold and realize its purpose. you should also memorize their methods of folding different parts.  I just designed a stag beetle and used Robert Lang’s Kabuto Mushi legs. The results were great!  Try different papers and find the different methods and tricks of folding with that paper. Lastly, figure out what papers best suit your tastes and styles of folding.”

-Nicholas LaFleur

Origamifreak64’s Flickr

 

Well i guess it’s like with most other things, in order to get better you simply need to practice. Fold a lot, read literature… there is no magic trick to it. i advice you to fold regularly, if possible everyday. Also read Robert Lang’s “Origami Design Secrets” and read through the section on Robert Langs website called “paper”.”

-Sipho Mabona

Mabona Origami

 

“What I do to improve is fold lots of crease patterns and fewer diagrams. For me, diagrams are more to improve folding technique, but they don’t give much insight to design. Crease patterns show exactly how paper is allocated, how points are formed, and how these points are all connected together (easily the hardest part of designing is adding creases between points). They also show how to use and incorporate multiple design styles.”

-Zoraz

OrigamiZoraz’s Flickr

 

“The only way to get better at origami is to fold carefully and keep at it. Nothing worth learning comes easily.”

-Andrew Hudson

Origami Weekly

 

 

“This tip can be applied to anything really, if you can’t fold something try folding another model that is twice as hard… even if you fail. Then go back and try that first model again.  I jumped straight into folding Satoshi Kamiya’s Phoenix (also my first crease pattern) and Ancient Dragon because I couldn’t do the Wizard. Now I can do all of them.  I apply this also when I dance and other skills in my life.”

-Kquan

 

I believe that folding all sorts of models helps. For example try some difficult old diagrams like Kirschenbaum’s Rock Crab to help you in your diagram decription skills, some human figures by Hojyo Takashi to help the finesse of your folding and the ability to lay out crease patterns in the full paper, some tiling and tasselations to help the precision and quality of your folding, and some free folding to explore the techinques you have obtained and to help you build a larger repertoire of moves and effects.  I specially like the perfect division of a central point to test out my students when they want to start out with difficult subjects like Lang’s insects and the like, I always say if you can do the perfect division in a central point cleanly you probably have the skills to fold an easy one like the butterfly from Insects 2.”

-Xilo Perales

Xilo Perales on Facebook

 

“I think the best advice I can give is to be patient, keep practicing, try new techniques, and keep pushing yourself to do better in any way possible. And don’t be afraid to take advice from others about how to improve, often times it can be quite helpful.”

-Chad Killeen

Blue-Paper on Deviant Art and Blue Paper on Flickr

 

Do you have any other great tips about how to improve your origami skills? If so share them in the comments!

 

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origami.me

Origami — a how-to community for paper folding artists « Origami :: WonderHowTo




Money Origami, Flower Edition:
10 Different Ways to Fold a Dollar Bill into a Blossoming Bloom


The very first banknotes were used by the Chinese in the 7th century, during the Tang Dynasty. Before it was used as a true currency, paper money was used as part of a deposit system in which merchants would leave large amounts of coins with a trusted associate and receive a paper receipt for the transaction. The reason was simple—the copper coins used as currency at the time were heavy.







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10 Easy, Last-Minute Origami Projects for Valentine’s Day


Valentine’s Day is a day for love, but it also just happens to be the time when every flower shop in town hikes up their prices. Chocolates are still relatively cheap, but I never understood why you have to give the gift of bigger love handles when something more creative gets the job done at a much cheaper price.












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Fold a Magic Rose Cube—A Flower in a Box Origami Puzzle


To play off Gertrude Stein’s famous quote, a rose is a rose is a magic paper cube. And with this paper folder’s guide, you’ll learn how to make your very own magic rose cube from paper using the Japanese art of origami. This design by Valerie Vann, and folded by YouTuber German Fernandez, is great for Valentine’s Day or any other day where a paper puzzle rose is needed. Just be prepared… it’s a not just a puzzle origami rose, it’s a puzzle folding it.







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We’ve all attempted to fold a paper airplane before, right? One we hoped would sail majestically through the air for a good while but just ended up nose-diving into the grass. Paper planes, an invention likely as old as paper, are models of engineering; and they must account for the same dynamics as real planes, from drag force to stability to weight. So what is the perfect design?








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