How to cry – How to Cry on Cue

How to Cry on Cue

Photo Source: YouTube

Ever wondered how the world’s greatest actors cry real tears on camera? Getting actual water to fall from your eyes while being pressured to give a compelling, honest performance on film—or even in the audition room!—may sound daunting. But turning on the waterworks like Julianne Moore isn’t as difficult as it may seem.

We asked a handful of talented film and TV actors for their tricks to summoning tears. Some can cry automatically; others need to rely on their acting training to make each on-camera take more impactful than the last. Keep the pointers below in mind, you crybaby.

Drink water!
There is one basic component to crying that also doubles as a handy trick: stay hydrated. Without enough fluid in your system, your body will be unable to activate its tear ducts. “When I was in school at NYU, grad school,” remembers Emmy winner Sterling K. Brown, “Andre Braugher came and spoke to us. He said, ‘If you want to cry you have to be hydrated. Like, literally, you have to drink lots of water. Because if there’s not water inside of you, water can’t come out of you.” Brown drinks plenty of water on set to create what he calls “the Denzel tear.” Want to act like Denzel Washington? Drink up!

Don’t force it.
“If the mind goes to, ‘How do I cry?’, then you’re not going to,” says NYC-based acting teacher Brad Calcaterra. At the Studio, which focuses on breaking down actors’ fears and limitations in front of a camera, Calcaterra encourages students to accept whatever emotions emerge during a scene. “If I’m working with a very specific moment with the actor where that emotion needs to be there, I work on getting to a place where the body is relaxed, breathing, and the focus is on what is at hand. The second the actor goes to, ‘I have to cry here,’ you’re focused on a result and you’re not telling the emotional truth of the moment.”

READ: “1 Way to Conquer Your Audition Fear”

Borrow from your personal experience…
“Some people are more emotionally available, some people cry once a week, once a day—that’s just who they are,” says “Marvel’s Luke Cage” star Mike Colter, who admits he is not one of those people. “You should know your triggers. In your life when you find yourself becoming emotional, you should remember what it was that made you emotional. And you can draw back on those things later.”

Note: This can be a slippery slope. Utilize personal inspiration rather than re-creation. If you’re playing an intense scene that resembles your personal life too closely, using that experience can submerge you in your personal feelings of grief, rage, or depression. Create enough distance from your memory so you’re not at its mercy and you don’t become emotionally unstable to the point that you can’t complete another take.

…or from your imagination.
Colter also says that because he’s not a Method actor, he relies on principles such as Sanford Meisner’s imaginary circumstances and Stella Adler’s power of imagination. “Once you prep those, [crying will] be there for you,” he says. The process is simple: Put yourself in an imaginary scenario that might stir in you intensely sad emotions. The best part: it’s solely yours to own. “It could be something that has nothing to do with the scene, and that’s your secret,” explains Colter. “No one has to know what you’re over there bawling about. You could be bawling about your kitty cat who just got bashed in a bag with a hammer! If you’re at a funeral and you’re crying, no one is going to pull you over and ask you why you’re crying.”

READ: “8 Acting Techniques (and the Stars Who Swear by Them)”

Focus on the character’s circumstances and stakes…
Don’t forget that your material provides everything you need to navigate any emotions that may come up, organically or artificially, in a scene. Brown says he uses personal experiences and his imagination—“trying to turn your own personal pain into something artistic”—but in combination with “the given circumstances of the character…. You can sometimes oscillate back and forth between the two; one can take over for another one.” While prepping your character and filling in the basic questions (Who? What? When? Where? Why?), identify what in the character’s personality might lead to tears.

…or fill in more circumstances as needed.
Academy Award winner Marion Cotillard invented an extensive backstory for her character in “Two Days, One Night.” After carefully studying the script and playing with her lines, the actor filled in personal details for the depressed Sandra, including everything that happened in her life prior to the events of the film. “I wrote her life before,” she told Backstage. “I wrote scenes I would use later when I needed some support to be able to burst into tears out of nowhere. I needed to build a structure of stories that I could use when I needed to reach this or that emotion.” The technique clearly worked: Cotillard earned her second, much-deserved Oscar nomination for the performance.

Authentic vulnerability matters (even more than actual tears).
Whether it’s “welling up or tears running down,” says Calcaterra, “what we’re wanting is a vulnerable moment.” In fact, vulnerability is more important than the actual production of tears. How often have you responded emotionally to a film or TV scene you’re watching when no actor in the scene has cried? Those actors’ vulnerability is so acutely honest, they can engender emotion in others even without tears.

Casting director Leah Daniels-Butler of Fox’s “Empire” says that in the audition room, “if it’s honest and it comes from a real place,” tears are welcome. But the key is not to fake it! “If the scene says you have to cry and you can’t evoke that emotion, then by all means maybe that’s not the [goal]. You just don’t want to come off fake. If it says, ‘she gets emotional’ or ‘holds back tears,’ and you feel you can’t get there, don’t do it. When people do that, it’s a little unbearable. Like, what are you doing?”

Remember: You can do it.
According to Calcaterra, “Every person, actor, human being is born with the capability to feel any emotion: sadness, loss, grief, envy, jealousy, pain.” To feel such emotions at the drop of a hat takes practice and baby steps—you’re not going to cry like Meryl Streep on your first try, so keep at it.

To practice your crying on camera, browse all of our film casting calls! And for more acting advice, check out Backstage’s YouTube channel!

www.backstage.com

How to Cry on Cue

Photo Source: Courtesy of The BGB Studio

To many, crying on cue is considered the gold standard of emotional accessibility. The idea is that crying at a moment’s notice is required if you truly have command over your instrument and want to give a director the emotion she needs in a timely manner.

But before we get to how to do it, let’s talk about why holding it up as a gold standard is ridiculous.

A casting director we know well often says that she hates when actors cry in auditions. If an actor thinks crying equals talent or good acting work, crying can become the goal.

How did the audition go?

I was in tears! It was amazing! or I couldn’t cry when I was supposed to. It sucked.

When crying is the goal, your audition becomes about showing the casting director that you can emote—Look what I can do!—so the scene ends up being all about your crying rather than how you were affected by your scene partner, the specifics of the scene, what you want in the scene, etc.. It’s all about you and your ego. Crying for the sake of crying isn’t acting.

Ok, let’s get to how to do it.

Many actors struggle to access sadness. For those of you who can’t “cry on cue,” sadness is a destination that you want to get to, but often come up short. And without access to sadness, you’re missing a really important tool from your toolbox. You’re unable to reflect a significant part of the human experience that comes up in a lot of your scene work.

READ: 2 Things Your Acting Needs to Book Work Right Now

You want to get there but you can’t, then you judge yourself for not being able to get there. That stage direction in the middle of the scene that reads, “She weeps uncontrollably” evokes fear and shame. You’ll have to fake it. It won’t be pretty.

So what to do?

First, know that sadness is not a destination. It is a beautiful feeling that lives in you. It’s already there (and you don’t have to live a life of pain and anguish to have sadness). You’re a sensitive person and if you allow yourself to be affected by the world around you, your sadness will emerge. Bringing sadness to your work is about allowing yourself to be sad. It’s not about “getting” sad. It’s about allowing.

Here’s how it goes: Something happens that triggers your sadness. But rather than allow that sadness to blossom, you run from it. You may have learned to equate sadness with weakness, you may be afraid of your sadness (What if I never stop crying?), etc. And all of that makes you push it down, smile it off, drink it away, and more. You’re in the practice of not being present with your feeling. You’ve created patterns of behavior that suppress sadness. You get sad, then you quickly move away from the sadness. Now it’s a habit.

But for sadness to be part of your work you have to disrupt that habit. You have to be present with your sadness. And in order to do that, you have to deal with the behavior you engage in that keeps you separate from it.

Again, presence is the answer. When you shut down, you have to acknowledge that you’re shutting down. You have to hold space with that block—the tension, the lump in your throat, the urge to hide, etc. You have to have compassion for it.

Same thing with your sadness itself. You have to hold space with it, as if it’s a child that needs attention. If the child is upset you can’t ignore it or try to forcefully silence it. You have to be present with it, look at it deeply, find out what it needs, or just be there with it so it knows you’re there. You can’t run away from it.

Judging yourself for not getting sad enough is a way that you run from your sadness. It keeps you from being present. You can perform sad scenes all you want, but if you don’t practice presence with both your sadness and the block that prevents it from blossoming, the sadness won’t emerge.

It takes patience and practice but you can learn to allow your sadness. Next time you get stuck in a scene, think about the block. Know that it’s there for a reason. It doesn’t feel safe. Think about your sadness. It wants to be heard but doesn’t have a voice. Stay there with it. Step-by-step, that compassion will lead to acceptance. And when it feels safer it will emerge.

The kind of transformational growth that we strive for at our studio—the kind of growth required to be a successful actor—doesn’t come quickly and it’s not achieved easily. It requires you to expand your notion of what is possible. But once you do, success has a way of finding you. For your work and your life, you have to allow yourself to feel. It’s your job as an actor and your birthright as a sensitive human being.

Expand your emotional toolbox. Join us in class today: BGB Spring+Summer.

Inspired? Check out our audition listings!

The views expressed in this article are solely that of the individual(s) providing them,
and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Backstage or its staff.

Risa Bramon Garcia

For the past 40 years, Risa has worked as a director, producer, casting director, and teacher. Having directed two features—including “200 Cigarettes”—she has also directed for TV and dozens of plays in New York and Los Angeles. Her casting résumé includes more than 80 feature films and shows, and includes “Desperately Seeking Susan,” “Fatal Attraction,” “JFK,” “The Joy Luck Club,” “The Affair,” “Masters of Sex,” and the original “Roseanne.”

See full bio and articles here!

Steve Braun

Steve Braun is an L.A.-based acting coach and communication consultant. Over his 15-year career, he has starred in movies and has been a series regular on television shows. He is also an acting teacher and coach.

See full bio and articles here!

www.backstage.com

How to Stop Crying so Much, so Easily, and at Work

People often cry at funerals, during sad movies, and when listening to sad songs. But other people may find themselves crying while having heated conversations with others, confronting someone they’re angry with, or talking about something important.

This kind of crying can cause embarrassment and confusion. The good news is that with time, you can learn how to control it.

You should also ask yourself if your crying really is a problem. Sometimes, through our tears we release emotions that are penned up and need to be expressed. There are times when crying can help you to actually feel better.

If you cry a lot, you may feel self-conscious. It may feel like people are taking you less seriously when they see you cry, or you may feel weak (which isn’t really true).

But if you cry a lot, it may mean you’re having difficulty dealing with your stress. Or you might feel helpless when stuck in certain situations or talking to certain people. Or, according to research, you might be stressed out by, or have trouble reading, people’s facial expressions.

Learning how to control your stress can sometimes help you better control your tears. Here are some tips to help you stop crying quickly:

  1. Tilt your head up slightly to prevent tears from falling. The tears will collect at the bottom of your eyelids so they don’t run down your face. This can stop the flow of tears and redirect your focus.
  2. Pinch yourself on the skin between your thumb and pointer finger — the pain might distract you from crying.
  3. Tense up your muscles, which can make your body and brain feel more confident and in-control, according to scientists.
  4. Make a neutral face, which can calm the person you’re talking to and make it less likely they’ll put on an expression that triggers your tears. Scientists have found that neutral faces trigger less brain activity than facial expressions exhibiting specific emotions.
  5. Physically step back from a stressful situation, such as a heated conversation.
  6. Focus on controlling your breathing. Consciously attempt to take in deep breaths and slowly exhale. This may help you to feel more calm, reduce your overall feelings of stress, and decrease your chances of starting (or continuing) crying.
  7. Blink rapidly if you’ve already started crying to help clear away tears so they don’t roll down your face.
  8. Do not blink if you feel like you might cry, this can prevent tears from falling.
  9. Change your thoughts and frame of mind. If you feel stressed out and like you will start crying, divert your attention from your worries and tears, and instead think of something else — a happy moment, a funny scene from a movie, or something you’re proud of — that will distract you.

Crying is something that everyone does. But if you feel like you’re crying too much, you might be too easily overwhelmed by stress, or you may have another issue going on, such as a depressive disorder. You can begin by focusing on reducing the stress in your life to reduce your crying. You can get a handle on your stress by taking these steps to identify, confront, and deal with the stress in your life:

  • Identify what is causing your stress (and your crying): Is it a personal issue, your environment, the people around you, or something else?
  • Reduce the number of things you commit to. Overscheduling is a major cause of stress in many people’s lives. Look at your calendar and think about what activities, obligations, or events you could cut out to help reduce your overall stress.
  • Stay on top of your obligations. Tight deadlines and procrastination can increase stress. Prevent stress by staying on top of your work and setting more realistic goals for yourself if you feel pressed for time when trying to complete projects.
  • Ask for help when you need it. Determine which people in your life — friends, family, and coworkers —you can call on for help coping with your stress.
  • Find a hobby. Enjoyable activities such as art, music, or volunteering can help reduce your overall stress level. Noncompetitive activities such as reading, fishing, or gardening are often the best at relieving stress.
  • Use relaxation techniques. Deep breathing, stretching, visualizing a peaceful scene, and repeating a mantra can help calm your brain and body when you feel stressed.
  • Make sure you get enough sleep. A lack of sleep can make it more likely that your emotions will get the better of you when you’re stressed. Most adults require seven to nine hours of sleep per night.

If you’re having trouble dealing with your stress, or you find yourself crying all the time, you might be dealing with a mental health condition such as major depression or bipolar disorder. These are serious mental health conditions that require medical treatment. If you’re concerned, see your mental healthcare provider right away for help.

Crying is a natural response to emotional situations. But some people cry more than others, and crying excessively can be uncomfortable. However, there are many things you can do to decrease the likelihood that you will start or continue crying. And there are things you can do at home to reduce the likelihood that you’ll start crying the next time you encounter a stressful situation. You should also know when to reach out to your doctor for help.

Next time you feel like you’re going to cry, or if you’ve started to tear up, remember that there are things you can do to stop your crying. Use these tips and confront the stressful situations in your life knowing you don’t have to cry, and if you start, you can control it. You don’t have to let your tears hold you back from being taken seriously or expressing your needs during difficult conversations.

www.healthline.com

100% – How To Cry

How To Cry” is a debut  Japanese single recorded by South Korean boy group 100%. It was released on January 25, 2017 by KISS Entertainment Inc.

Details

  • Artist: 100%
  • Released: January 25, 2017
  • Korean Title:
  • English Title: How To Cry
  • Genre: J-pop
  • Label: KISS Entertainment Inc
  • Single: How To Cry

Track List

  1. How to cry
  2. Eternal
  3. Snow
  4. Sweet Memories
  5. How to cry (Inst.)

100% – How To Cry (Music Videos & Performances)

Official Music VideoTeaser

100% – How To Cry Lyrics

RomajiJapaneseEnglish translation

[Translation:Google translate]

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www.kpopscene.com

How to Stop Crying — Controlling Your Emotions

So how do I stop crying at inopportune times (like, say, when I’m discussing my uterus with my obstetrician)?

Some of the experts I interviewed suggested pinching the bridge of my nose, where the tear ducts are, to stop the flow. But I couldn’t get my hand to my nose fast enough. And though I received excellent advice about rehearsing nontearful things I might say in a confrontation, such as the one with my son’s daycare administrator, that didn’t work, either.

Then Jerry Bubrick, PhD, a cognitive and behavioral psychologist in New York City, told me to take a step back—literally. «It’s not what the other person says that’s causing you to cry,» he explained. «It’s how you interpret it.» I’d never thought of it this way, but Bubrick had hit on something that made sense. I may be frustrated or angry in the moment, but I can decide which insults or slights are worthy of such an outpouring of emotion. Getting to the root of why I well up so easily will probably take a lifetime of therapy, but for now, Bubrick provided me with a practical way to deal with its effects. The trick, he told me, is to remove myself from the drama, even by just a foot, to short-circuit the usual rush of tears.

As I listened to Bubrick talk about the possible effect of something so simple on my mental state, I remembered a study I had come across weeks earlier, suggesting that even our facial expressions can influence how our brains process emotions. Researchers at Columbia University had found that study participants reported having a less intense emotional reaction to a scary video when they didn’t frown during the viewing. Was it possible, since I enter most fraught interactions with eyebrows raised and knitted together, mouth pressed into a frown, that my expression might actually be triggering the feelings that lead to tears? If so, could I really cure the crying problem with a neutral face and a single step away from whatever was upsetting me? It seemed unlikely, but I decided to give it a try.

Two days after speaking with Bubrick, I showed up for a doctor’s appointment only to learn that the doctor wasn’t in. His assistant cavalierly mentioned, without a trace of apology, that he had meant to cancel my appointment but got distracted. Meanwhile, I had hired a babysitter, blown a deadline, and driven an hour through maddening traffic to get there. I felt anger welling up. But instead of getting flustered, I relaxed my face and took a step away from the counter, which felt only a little weird.

«Are you kidding me?» I blinked, tearless.

And then: «That’s incredibly rude.»

It was a small victory—but an unbelievably empowering one. For the first time in 25 years, I expressed a strong emotion without dissolving under its weight.

Since then I’ve been practicing the new technique—in talks with my husband about money, in a minor confrontation with a friend, in meetings with editors. It’s sometimes hard to remember to use the tricks in the heat of the moment, but with every tearless encounter I’m gaining confidence that my emotions won’t get the best of me. I recently made a follow-up visit to my son’s daycare, where I told the administrator I was transferring him to a preschool. When I gave her the news, my eyes were as dry as her heart was cold—and that felt right.

Taffy Brodesser-Akner is a freelance writer whose work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine and the Los Angeles Times.

Next: Why men cry less than women

www.oprah.com

100% (백퍼센트) — How to Cry

Yeah 100%

Please tell me how to cry yeah

Muhyōjōna sekai ni kawatteita

Nichijō wa kamen o kabutta mitaidatta

Itsuwatta egao

La la la la la la la la la la

Futari de sugoseba afureteta many emotions

Kenka shitara naite fuzakete waratta every day

Kowashite ushinatte

Tsukuriageta Kamen no naka never cry

Tatta ichido dake no misuteiku

Boku no heart break

Waratte uketotta gubbai goodbye

Boku no one lie

Daremo shiranai

Tell me how to cry

Kokoro wa itande mo

Tell me how to cry

Nagarenai namida wa Where is it?

Kakushita no wa When is it?

Soredemo warai tsudzuketeru

Tell me how to cry

Kimi to no omoide mo

Tell me how to cry

Arainagashite kure Who is it?

Boku o waraudarou

Kobosenai Tell me how to cry

Maiban insomnia

Hitori no yoru wa hiro sugiru bedroom

Tameiki majiri no good night

Kimi no koe wa kikoenai

La la la la la la la la la la

Futari de sugoshita

Omoide no many pictures

Kimi no tonari utsuru

Itsuka no boku wa mō not exist

Nani mo iranai

Kimi sae ireba yokatta Oh no, why?

Kitto kimatteitate answer

Sudeni no matter

Moshimo ano toki see you

Ietara with you

Nanika kawatta?

Tell me how to cry

Kokoro wa itande mo

Tell me how to cry

Nagarenai namida wa Where is it?

Kakushita no wa When is it?

Soredemo warai tsudzuketeru

Tell me how to cry

Kimi to no omoide mo

Tell me how to cry

Arainagashite kure Who is it?

Boku o waraudarou

Kobosenai Tell me how to cry

Boku ga bokurashiku areba

Nakushita nanika mo mitsukaru kana

Tell me how to cry nagarenai

Tsurai omoi shitai wake janai alright

I can’t back Koko ni shika inai

Sō kokoro sudeni scrap

Iikikasu crap

Itsumade mo sotozenai kamen

Please tell me how to cry

Tell me how to cry

Kokoro wa itande mo

Tell me how to cry

Nagarenai namida wa Where is it?

Kakushita no wa When is it?

Soredemo warai tsudzuketeru

Tell me how to cry

Kimi to no omoide mo

Tell me how to cry

Arainagashite kure Who is it?

Boku o waraudarou

Kobosenai Tell me how to cry

Text eingefügt von JaneTrestry

Video eingefügt von JaneTrestry

www.karaoke-texte.de

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