Hello in arabic – 10 Ways to say »Hello» in Arabic

Arabic Greetings and Good-Byes — dummies

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By David F. DiMeo

When traveling in Arabic-speaking countries, you’ll find that the words and phrases you use most frequently will be the common Arabic greetings. These Arabic words and phrases will quickly become second nature to you because you use them day in and day out with everyone you come across.

Saying hello and good-bye

Polite greetings are just as important in Arabic-speaking countries as they are in America. In fact when greeting a group of people, it is best to greet each person in the group individually to ensure that everyone gets a proper greeting. Some of the most common ways to greet someone in Arabic are

Keep in mind that because of the conservative nature in many Arabic-speaking countries it is considered rude for men and women to greet each other in public.

In addition to the initial greetings, there are a number of Arabic greetings that have a specific traditional response.

GreetingPronunciationTraditional ResponsePronunciation
Peace be upon you. (formal/group)as-salaam alaykumUpon you be peacewa alaykum salaam
Good morningSabaaH al-khayrMorning of lightSabaaH an-nuur
Good eveningMasaa al-khayrEvening of lightMasaa an-nuur

When meeting someone for the first time or greeting someone in a formal situation, it is common for members of the same sex to exchange handshake. However, if they’re close friends or family, the standard greeting is a handshake and a kiss on each cheek.

Always shake hands with your right hand. The left hand is considered unclean.

Farewells can vary depending on where you’re visiting, but two common ways to say goodbye to someone are maa as-salaama (goodbye) and ila-liqaa (until we meet again).

Asking and responding to “How are you?”

How are you? How’s it going? How many times a day do we hear or say these brief greetings at the beginning of our conversations? So many times, in fact, that we rarely even think about the response, we often respond with a standard “fine” or “good” regardless of who we are actually feeling. The same is true in Arabic. The question kayf Haalak? (How are you?) usually calls for a formulaic response — “Fine, praise God” (bi-khayr, al-Hamdu lillah) — rather than an actual description of your current condition. However, if you have a real need or are speaking to a friend, you can give a more realistic response. You can use anaa . . . (I am . . . ) followed by one of these conditions:

saiid/saiida (happy [M/F]) .(Arabic adjectives have masculine and feminine forms. So, if you need to change these adjectives to feminine, just add an a.)

Haziin/Haziina (sad)

tabaan/tabaana (tired)

ghaDbaan/ghaDbaa (angry)

aTshaan/aTshaa (thirsty)

jawaan/jawaa (hungry)

bardaan/bardaana (cold)

Harraan/Harraa (hot)

mashghuul/mashghuula (busy)

mariiD/mariiDa (sick)

mutaakhkhir/mutaakhkhira (late)


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Hellos and Greetings in Arabic

      Audio Post
In this lesson we will discuss the necessary phrases for greeting one another. The normal Hello/Hi in Arabic Greetings has two forms. The first one is “As-salaamu alaykum”       السلام عليكم which is made of two words and means “Pease be upon you”. The response is switching words and adding a small “wa” at the beginning which means “and”, the result is “Wa alaykom salam”       وعليكم السلام which means “And on you be the peace”. So, let’s say you’ve just walked into a room. I’d say “Salamu Alaykom” which means “Hello”. You would say “wa alaykom a salaam” meaning “Hello back”. The other form of saying Hello/Hi in Arabic is “Marḥaban”       مرحبا. The response could be the same keyword Marḥaban, Ahlan, or any other form of greeting presented in the table below:

English GreetingArabic GreetingGreeting Response
1HelloAs-salam alaykom      السلام عليكمWa Alykom As-slam      وعليكم السلام
2HiMarḥaban      مرحباAhlan Wa Sahlan      أهلا وسهلا
3WelcomeAhlan      أَهلاAhlan Wa Sahlan      أهلا وسهلا
4Good morningSabaḥu Al-khair      صباح الخيرSabaḥu An-Nur      صباح النور
5Good afternoonMasa’u Al-khair      مساء الخيرAl-khair An-Nur      مساء النور

From an Islamic perspective, As-salaamu alaykum is the most common and recommended way to greet a person whether it’s day or night. However, it’s important to either match or outdo the person you converse with in the extent of your greetings. So, if someone were to greet you with as-salaamu alaykum, you should respond with at least “wa alaykum assalaam”, or you should better it with “wa 3alaykum assalaam wa wa raḥmat allahi ta’ala wa barakatuhu       وعليكم السلام ورحمة الله تعالى وبركاته which means “And on you be the peace and mercy of allah and his Blessing”.

Some people may also use some additional words with “marḥaban” and “ahlan”, like marḥaban bika (for male)/marḥaban biki (for female) or ahlan bika/ahlan biki (bika/biki means “with you”, so greetings to you, or greetings with you).

I hope this article was useful to you Arabic learning. Please check our other posts and comeback again for more Arabic lessons.

Related

softarabic.com

Adele’s «Hello» in Arabic | Arabic Language Blog

Marhaba! So, are you an Adele fan? Well, I am. My wife and I have been following her since the release of her first album ‘19’ in 2008. Her latest hit “Hello” from the album ‘25’ is topping all music charts around the world. Over 500 million fans (and counting!!!) have watched the music video of the song on YouTube. Given that Adele’s latest hit is extremely popular across the globe, I thought it would be interesting and fun as well as useful to learn the song lyrics in Arabic. So, today, I am sharing this beautiful tune by Adele, which translates to ‘Marhaba’(مرحبا)- yes, the word I start with all my blog posts! I have added the song in the form of a YouTube video and added the lyrics in English so that you can follow and sing with Adele. For our purposes, I have also translated the lyrics to Arabic so that you can learn what these lyrics mean. I have also added a cover of the song by Noel Kharman, an up-and-coming artist from Palestine, in form of a YouTube video. Kharman covers the song and also blends in a Fairouz classic called ‘Keefak Enta’ (كيفك انتَ) which translates to ‘How Are you?’ Enjoy this beautiful rendition!!

Adele – Hello

Hello, it’s me
مرحبا, انها انا

I was wondering if after all these years you’d like to meet
كنت اتسائل هل بعد كل هذه السنوات تحب ان نلتقي

To go over everything
لنقوم بمراجعة كل شيء

They say that time’s supposed to heal ya
يقولون ان الوقت من المفترض ان يشفيك

But I ain’t done much healing
ولكني لم أُشفى كثيرا

Hello, can you hear me
مرحبا, هل يمكنك سماعي؟

I’m in California dreaming about who we used to be
انا في كاليفورنيا احلم كيف كنا معا

When we were younger and free
عندما كنا أصغر و احرار

I’ve forgotten how it felt before the world fell at our feet
لقد نسيت هذا الاحساس قبل ان سقط العالم على اقدامنا

There’s such a difference between us
هناك اختلاف بيننا

And a million miles
وملايين الاميال

Hello from the other side
مرحبا من الجانب الآخر

I must have called a thousand times
ربما اتصلت أكثر من آلاف المرات

To tell you I’m sorry for everything that I’ve done
لاقول لك انا آسفة على كل ما قمت به

But when I call you never seem to be home
ولكن عندما اتصل بك يبدو انك لست في البيت

Hello from the outside
مرحبا من الخارج

At least I can say that I’ve tried to tell you
على الأقل يمكنني ان اقول انني حاولت ان اقول لك

I’m sorry for breaking your heart
انا آسفة لكسر قلبك

But it don’t matter it clearly doesn’t tear you apart anymore
ولكن لا يهم, فمن الواضح ان ذلك لم يعد يزعجك

Hello, how are you
مرحبا, كيف حالك؟

It’s so typical of me to talk about myself I’m sorry
انه من النموذجي ان اتكلم عن نفسي, انا آسفة

I hope that you’re well
اتمني ان تكون بخير

Did you ever make it out of that town where nothing ever happened?
هل نجحت بالخروج من البلدة حيث لا شيء يحدث؟

It’s no secret that the both of us
انه ليس سراً

Are running out of time
أن الوقت ينفذ مننا

https://youtu.be/8Hb8ofvzggE

For now take care and stay tuned for upcoming posts!
Happy Learning!
Have a nice day!!
نهاركم سعيد

About the Author:jesa

Salam everyone! Born as an American to two originally Arab parents, I have been raised and have spent most of my life in Beirut, Lebanon. I have lived my good times and my bad times in Beirut. I was but a young child when I had to learn to share my toys and food with others as we hid from bombs and fighting during the Lebanese Civil War. I feel my connection to Arabic as both a language and culture is severing and so it is with you, my readers and fellow Arabic lovers, and through you that I wish to reestablish this connection by creating one for you.

blogs.transparent.com

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You can pause the video any time and reply any part you like or didn’t hear well. For the table below I used the blue font in some places in transliteration to
distinguish between the female and male gender. Which is not that different
from the masculine form, just an extra i or a

The tick () is for a sound like soundless a or a stop
just to make closer to the real sound which doesnt exist in English. You will be able to hear it many time in the video.

The th is sometimes pronounced as th of that
and sometimes as th of think, I usually state how you should
pronounce it.

There is a sharp h that is different from the regular h,
however a person can be understood even if its pronounced as a regular h.

The video below contains the same text as the table below it, however the video contains audio as well, so that you will be able to hear the words and see how they’re written.

 

 

Arabic Phrases

English
Phrases

Arabic
Transliterated Phrases

Arabic Script

Arabic
Greetings:

 

 

Hi!

Salam!

سلام

Good Morning!

Sabah el kheer

صباح
الخير

Good Evening!

Masaa el kheer

مساء
الخير

Welcome! (to greet
someone)

Marhaban

مرحبا

How Are You?

Kaifa haloka/ haloki ( female)

كيف
حالك؟

I’m Fine, Thanks!

Ana bekhair, shokran!

أنا
بخير شكرا

And You?

Wa ant? / Wa anti? (female)

و أنت؟

Good/ So-So.

Jayed/ ‘aadee

جيد /
عادي

Thank You (Very Much)!

Shokran (jazeelan)

شكرا
(جزيلا)

You’re Welcome! (for
thank you)

Alafw

ألعفو

Hey! Friend!

Ahlan sadiqi/ sadiqati! (female)

أهلا
صديقي
/صديقتي!

I Missed You So Much!

Eshtaqto elaika/ elaiki (female) katheeran

إشتقت
إليك كثيرا

What’s New?

Maljadeed?

مالجديد؟

Nothing Much

Lashai jadeed

لا شيء
جديد

Good Night!

Tosbeho/ tosbeheena (female) ala khair/

تصبح/
تصبحين على
خير

See You Later!

Araka/ Araki (female) fi ma ba’d

أراك
في مابعد

Good Bye!

Maa salama

مع
السلامة

 

Help &
Directions:

 

 

I’m Lost

Ada’tu tareeqi!

 أضعت
طريقي!

Can I Help You?

Hal beemkani
mosaadatuk?

هل
بإمكاني
مساعدتك؟

Can You Help Me?

Hal beemkanek
mosaadati?

هل
بإمكانك
مساعدتي؟

Where is the (bathroom/
pharmacy)?

Ayna ajedu (al
merhaad/ assaidaliah)?

أين
أجد
(المرحاض/ الصيدلية)؟

Go Straight! Then Turn
Left/ Right!

imshy ala tool, thumma
arrij yaminan/ shimalan

أمشٍ
على طول ثم
عرّج يمينا/
شمالا!

I’m Looking For John.

Abhatu an John

أبحث
عن جون

One Moment Please!

Lahda men fadlek/ fadleki (female)

لحظة
من فضلك

Hold On Please! (phone)

ibqa/ ibqay (female) ala al khat raja’an

إبقى/
أبقي علي
الخط رجاءا!

How Much Is This?

Kam howa thamanoh? (th
as in bath)

كم هو
ثمنه؟

Excuse Me …! ( to ask
for something)

Men fathlek/ fathleki (female) (th as in that)

من
فضلك

Excuse Me! ( to pass by)

Alma’derah!

المعذرة

Come With Me!

Ta’ala/ ta’alay (female) ma’ee!

تعال
معي!

Personal Info:

 

 

Do You Speak (English/
Arabic)?

Hal tatakallamu alloghah
alenjleziah/ alarabiah?

هل
تتكلم اللغة
الإنجليزية
/العربية؟

Just a Little.

Qaleelan!

قليلا!

What’s Your Name?

Ma esmouk? Ma esmouki?

ما
إسمك؟

My Name Is .

Esmee

إسمي….

Mr. Mrs./ Miss

Assayed/ Assayeda/ Al
anesah …

السيد…
/السيدة/ الانسة…

Nice To Meet You!

Motasharefon/ motasharefatun (f) bema’refatek

متشرف /
متشرفة
بمعرفتك

You’re Very Kind!

Anta lateef/ Anti lateefa

أنت
لطيف! أنتِ
لطيفة!

Where Are You From?

Men ayna anta/ anti (female)?

من أين
أنت؟

I’m From (the U.S/ Morocco)

Ana men (amreeka/
almaghrib)

أنا من
(أمريكا/
المغرب)

Im (American)

Ana (amreeki/ amrekiah (female)

أنا
أمريكي/أمريكية

Where Do You Live?

Ayna taskun?/ Ayna taskuneen? (female)

أين
تسكن؟  أين
تسكنين؟

I live in (the U.S/ France)

A’eesho fel welayat almotaheda/
faransa

أعيش
في الولايات
المتحدة/
فرنسا

Did You Like It Here?

Hal istamta’ta
bewaqtika/ bewaqtiki (f) huna?

هل
استمتعت
بوقتك هنا؟

Morocco Is a Wonderful Country

Al maghrib baladun
jameel!

المغرب
بلد جميل!

What Do You Do For A
Living?

Ma mehnatuk? Mehnatuki (female)

ما
مهنتك؟

I Work As A (Translator/
Businessman)

A’mal ka(motarjim/ rajul
a’maal)

أعمل
كمترجم/ كرجل
أعمال

I Like Arabic

Ohibbu allughah al
arabia

أحب
اللغة
العربية

I’ve Been Learning
Arabic For 1 Month

adrusu allughah
al arabia mundu shahr

أدرس
اللغة
العربية منذ
شهر

Oh! That’s Good!

Hada shay’un Jameel

هذا
شيء جميل

How Old Are You?

Kam howa umruk? umroki (female)

كم هو
عمرك؟

I’m (twenty, thirty)
Years Old.

Umri ( ‘eshreen/
thalatheen) sanah (th as in bath)

عمري
(عشرين/
ثلاثين) سنة

I Have To Go

Yajebu an
athhaba al aan! (th as in that)

يجب أن
اذهب الآن

I Will Be Right Back!

Sa arjeo halan

سأرجع
حالا

 

If you are looking for a more extensive Arabic course, we recommend Breaking The Arabic Code

Wishes:

 

 

Good Luck!

Bettawfeeq

بالتوفيق!

Happy Birthday!

Eid meelad sa’eed!

عيد
ميلاد سعيد

Happy New Year!

Sana sa’eedah!

سنة
سعيدة

Merry Christmas!

A’yaad meelad Saeedah

أعياد
ميلاد سعيد!

Happy Eid!

Eid mobarak!

عيد
مبارك!

Happy Ramadan

Ramadan mobarak!

رمضان
مبارك

Congratulations!

Mabrook!

مبروك!

Enjoy! (For meals)

Shahia tayebah!

شهية
طيبة

I’d Like To Visit
Morocco One Day

Arghabu bezeyarat al
maghrib.

أرغب
بزيارة
المغرب

Say Hi To John For me.

Sallem ala John men
ajlee

سلِّم
على (جون) من
أجلي

Bless you (when
sneezing)

Rahimaka Allah

رحمك
الله

Good Night & Sweet
Dreams!

Laila sa’eda wa ahlaam
ladida

ليلة
سعيدة و أحلام
لذيذة!

Misunderstanding:

 

 

I’m Sorry! (if you don’t
hear something)

Afwan!

عفوا!

Sorry (for a mistake)

Aasef!

أسف!

No Problem!

La moshkelah

لامشكلة

Can You Say It Again?

Aed men fadlek!/ Aeedi men fadleki (fem)

أعد من
فضلك

Can You Speak Slowly?

Takalam bebot men
fadlek/ fadleki (fem)

تكلم
ببطء من فضلك

Write It Down Please!

Oktobha men fadlek/ Oktobiha men fadleki (fem)

أكتبها
من فضلك! /
أكتبيها من
فضلك!

I Don’t Understand!

La afham!

لا
أفهم

I Don’t Know!

La aref!

لآ
أعرف!

I Have No Idea.

La adri!

لاأدري

What’s That Called In
Arabic?

Ma esmoho bel arabiah?

ما
أسمه
بالعربية؟

What Does
«qit» Mean In English?

Mada ta’ni
kalemat «qit» bel inglizia?

ماذا
تعني كلمة
«قط»
بالانجليزية؟

How Do You Say
«Please» In Arabic?

Kaifa taqoulu kalimat
«please» bel arabia?

كيف
تقول كلمة
«بليز»
بالعربية؟

What Is This?

Ma hatha (th
as in that)

ما
هذا؟

My Arabic Is Bad.

Lughati al
arabic laisat kama yajib

لغتي
العربية
ليست كما يجب

I need to practice my
Arabic

Ahtaaju an
atadarraba ‘ala al arabia!

احتاج
ان اتدرب على
العربية

Don’t Worry!

La taqlaq! La taqlaqi (fem)

لاتقلق/ لا تقلقي!

Arabic
Expressions & Words:

 

 

Good/ Bad/ So-So.

Jayed/ saye’/ ‘adee

جيد /
سيء / عادي

Big/ Small

Kabeer/ Sagheer

كبير /
صغير

Today/ Now

Alyawm/ Al aan

اليوم /
الآن

Tomorrow/ Yesterday

Ghadan/ Albareha

غدا /
البارحة

Yes/ No

Naam/ Laa

نعم / لا

Here You Go! (when
giving something)

Khod!

خد!

Do You Like It?

Hal ajabak? Hal ajabaki? (female)

هل
أعجبك؟

I Really Like It!

Ajabani haqqan!

أعجبني
حقا

I’m Hungry/ Thirsty.

Ana jae/ ana atshaan

أنا
جائع/ أنا
عطشان

In The Morning/ Evening/
At Night.

Sabahan/ masaan/ laylan

صباحا/
مساءا/ ليلا

This/ That. Here/There

Hatha/ thalek. Huna/
hunaak (th as in that)

هذا
/ذلك. هنا/هناك

Me/ You. Him/ Her.

Ana/ anta/ anti (you female). Houwa/ Hiya

أنا/
أنت. هو/ هي

Really!

Haqqan!

حقا!

Look!

Onzor / Onzori (female)

أنظر!
 أنظري!

Hurry Up!

Asre’/ Asre’ee (female)

أسرع!
 أسرعي!

What? Where?

Matha? Ayn? (th as in
that)

ماذا؟
أين؟

What Time Is It?

kam essa’a?

كم
الساعة؟

It’s 10 o’clock.
07:30pm.

Enaha al
‘ashera. Ennaha assaabe’a wa nesf.

إنها
العاشرة.
إنها
السابعة و
النصف مساءا

Give Me This!

A’teni hatheh! (th as in
that)

أعطني
هذه!

I Love You!

Uhibbok/ uhibboki (female)

أحبك

I Feel Sick.

ana mareed.

أنا
مريض.

I Need A Doctor

ahtaju tabeeban!

أحتاج
طبيبا!

One, Two, Three

wahed, ithnaan, thalatha
(th as in think).

واحد,
إثنان, ثلاثة

Four, Five, Six

arba’a, khamsa, sitta

أربعة,
خمسة, ستة

Seven, Eight, Nine, Ten

sab’a, thamania (th as
in think), tis’a, ‘ashara.

سبعة,
ثمانية, تسعة,
عشرة

 

I used the blue font sometimes in transliteration to
distinguish between the female and male gender, which is not that different
from the masculine form, just an extra i or a

The tick () is for a sound like soundless a or a stop
just to make closer to the real sound which doesnt exist in English.

The th is sometimes pronounced as th of that
and sometimes as th of think, I usually state how you should
pronounce it.

There is a sharp h that is different from the regular h,
however a person can be understood even if its pronounced as a regular h.

I
hope the content of this page was useful to you, and that you learned some Arabic phrases, expressions and words.

 

arabic.speak7.com

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