Can parakeets talk – Can parakeets talk

How can you train a parakeets to talk

Parakeets are EXTREMELY smart and friendly. It always breaks my heart to see a parakeet stuffed into a cage, never let out, never interacted with. Parakeets are flock birds! They thrive on being cuddled, being nuzzled, having that physical interaction with their flock. And if there is only one parak…eet in the cage, that flock is you! Hand training is a critical part of owning and raising a happy parakeet. If you have already Bought a New Parakeet and Gotten the Parakeet Used to your Home it’s time to now start hand-training it. You can’t let a parakeet out to fly around the room until it understands that your hand is safe, and that your finger is a perch it should hop onto when you say «UP». So you need to work on this next. If your parakeet was hand-raised, this is probably easy. Your parakeet probably already knows the command «up». Simply put your hand SLOWLY into the cage, talking nicely to it. Then gently press your finger against its chest and say «UP» in a gentle but firm voice. She should step up onto your finger. Keep it still and say things like «good bird» in a soft, soothing voice. If your parakeet does this easily, then you’re already ready for it to come out and enjoy a bit of flying around. However, let’s say you had to buy your keet from a Bin O Budgies and it is very skittish. You have to train it that you are a friend and to be trusted. Follow the step by step instructions below, and in a few weeks you will have a parakeet that will be your loving companion for years and years. DO NOT SKIP A STEP. Be sure to fully be complete with a step before moving on to the next. This is very important in having this training work properly!.
STEP ONE — TRUSTING THE HAND In step one, you simply get your parakeet used to your hand being in the cage. STEP TWO — PERCH TRAINING In step two, you train your parakeet to step up onto a perch on command. STEP THREE — FINGER-PERCH TRAINING In step three, you show your parakeet that it’s OK to step on a perch that also has a finger attached to it. STEP FOUR — FINGER TRAINING In step four, still staying just in the cage, your parakeet learns that your finger is a safe perch to sit on. STEP FIVE — OUT-OF-CAGE FINGER TRAINING In step five, the parakeet learns that her trusted finger is safe to sit on, even if it’s outside the cage. The more you interact with your parakeet, the friendlier he will get! Soon you’ll find he loves hanging out on your shoulder while you do things, nibbling on earrings or necklaces. When I work at my computer, my parakeets hang out on the curtain rod right next to me, chirping down at me. Remember, none of this will happen instantly. If you bought a hand raised parakeet it might all happen on the first day — but people who buy budgies out of large bins are in essence buying wild birds. It can easily take several weeks to get your budgie used to you as a trusted person. You have to be patient and work on this every day, to let your parakeet learn about you and learn to trust you. It can’t be rushed. Parakeets are extremely intelligent and need to learn to trust you on their own time. Parakeets do NOT BITE unless they are being threatened. So as long as you are quiet and gentle and friendly with your parakeet, you will have a quite loving companion! (MORE)

pets.answers.com

How to Teach Parakeets to Talk » VripMaster

Expert Reviewed
Parakeets, also known as budgies, are very popular pets because they are easy to care for and are smart and inquisitive birds. If you want to bond with your parakeet and keep it stimulated and happy, you can even teach it to talk. Parakeets are great mimics that love to speak in the language of their flock, whether that flock consists of other birds or humans like you.

Preparing Your Parakeet to Talk


  1. Have a limited number of parakeets. Parakeets can develop their ability to make noises by talking to other birds, so having a few birds can help both of them develop the variety of their chirping. However, having too many birds will focus all their communication on other birds, instead of on communicating with you.

    • Having a few birds will usually not limit your ability to train them to talk but more than a few could hinder your progress.
    • If you only have one parakeet, trick it into thinking it has a friend by placing a mirror in its cage. This will help it develop and practice chirping. However, you should take the mirror out of its cage before you start teaching it how to talk, so that your bird focuses its attention on you.

  2. Make your parakeet comfortable with you. Make friends with your bird by spending time with it, speaking to it, and keeping it nice and comfy in your home. Basically, treat your parakeet like it is a part of your family, because it is.

    • The goal should be to build up trust between you and your parakeet. Don’t force the bird to interact with you if it doesn’t want to. If the bird is scared of you or ignoring you it is just a sign that the time is not right or that you are moving too quickly. It is not a sign that your bird will never bond with you.

  3. Pick the right time to train your parakeet. Make sure that the bird is calm and ready to focus its attention on you. If the bird is tired or distracted, it won’t be as easy to train.

    • A good time to train your bird is first thing in the morning. You can even start repeating words for your bird before uncovering its cage at the start of the day.

Training Your Parakeet to Talk


  1. Repeat one word to your bird, over and over. Speak clearly and slowly, teaching them only one word at a time. Your parakeet may not know to repeat the word right away, but just keep repeating it.

    • Note that parakeets are best with the consonants d,t,k,p, or b. A simple phrase like «Hi, how are you?» won’t help because it is hard for your bird to say it.
    • If you don’t know what word to teach your bird first, consider teaching it it’s name. This is a word they have probably heard before, so the sounds should be familiar to your parakeet already.
  2. Reward your parakeet if he or she says the word you’re teaching it. This will reinforce the behavior and also help to further the bond between you and your bird. Parakeets love millet sprays; Celery and carrots are also great treats and they provide essential nutrients for your budgie’s health.

  3. Speak to your bird for a few minutes at a time. However, don’t try to train it for too long in one session. It’s a good idea to work with your parakeet for about a half an hour a day. If you try to work with it for too long, your bird may get bored and could become less willing to learn. 

  4. Don’t let the bird get distracted during lessons. Keep it focused by covering three sides of the bird’s cage with a cloth. Stand right in front of their cage when talking to your bird, so it knows that it is you speaking to it.

  5. Keep each lesson focused. Don’t move onto a second word until your parakeet can say the first phrase correctly at least three times in a row. Making sure that your parakeet really knows a word before moving on will make it more likely that it will repeat the same word or phrase at a later time.

  6. Be patient. Do not try to force your parakeet to talk. Many parakeets never learn to talk, but it’s fun to try!

  7. Move on to more complicated words or phrases. Once your parakeet has mastered a few words, you can move on to full phrases. Just as with teaching it words, repeat the phrase to your parakeet when it is calm and willing to focus on you. The parakeet will be focused if you are the only one in the room,but others can cause your parakeet to be frightened.

  8. Get your parakeet to name an object or an object’s color. As you say a word, hold up the object. With enough practice, you should be able to just hold up the object and the parakeet will repeat the word you taught it. It will simply be repeating the sounds you made but it will appear as if it can actually identify the object.

Tips

  • Combine teaching your parakeet to talk with training it to sit on your finger. If you want your bird to step on your finger, lightly press your finger against his/her stomach. Once the bird is on your finger, you can talk directly to it.
  • Try singing or playing music to your budgies! Some parakeets will even learn music and repeat it.
  • Make noises to them everyday at the same time they will learn to repeat it.

Warnings

  • Don’t scold, scare, or get angry at your parakeet! Not all parakeets can talk. Do not ever be mean to your bird out of disappointment. If you are getting frustrated, walk away instead of punishing your bird for your frustration.
  • When you take your bird out of the cage, close your windows. Birds will think it’s an exit and might fly into the glass, which could severely hurt or kill them.

vripmaster.com

How Parakeets Talk | Pets


Parakeets don’t “talk” in the way that humans do. Theirs
is a learned behavior that mimics sounds. A parakeet can learn to say
words that you teach it, or it can learn to mimic sounds such as the
doorbell or the kettle’s whistle. A parakeet does not speak with vocal
chords, but by controlling the airflow through its throat with
muscles. Watch a parakeet when it’s talking and you will see its
throat vibrate. So although it seems as though a parakeet is speaking
with you, it is repeating sounds, words or phrases that it hears
repeatedly. Which Parakeets Talk?Male parakeets are the best
candidates for learning words. A parakeet talks to communicate with
its flock, so if your para

Parakeets don’t “talk” in the way that humans do. Theirs
is a learned behavior that mimics sounds. A parakeet can learn to say
words that you teach it, or it can learn to mimic sounds such as the
doorbell or the kettle’s whistle. A parakeet does not speak with vocal
chords, but by controlling the airflow through its throat with
muscles. Watch a parakeet when it’s talking and you will see its
throat vibrate. So although it seems as though a parakeet is speaking
with you, it is repeating sounds, words or phrases that it hears
repeatedly. Which Parakeets Talk?Male parakeets are the best
candidates for learning words. A parakeet talks to communicate with
its flock, so if your para

Pets

Google Talk and Yahoo Voice provide low-cost and free ways to talk
with others around the world from your Sony VAIO laptop. Occasionally,
problems can occur with your video and voice chatting that can make it
difficult to converse. Depending on the cause, the resolution can be
as simple as adjusting your settings or updating the software.
SettingsCheck the settings for Google Talk and Yahoo Voice if the
sound and video is not working on your Sony VAIO laptop during a
conversation. Open the settings of each and click on “Video and
Voice.” If you want to use the built-in speakers and microphone
to use the applications, ensure that each is selected in the drop-down
menus. You can

Internet

An experience common to many parakeet owners is the phenomenon of
seeing their parakeet swell up or puff out their feathers. This is not
unusual and can mean various things ranging from normal to serious.
ReasonWhen parakeets fluff their feathers, they are trying to keep
warm. This gives the bird a «swollen» appearance, but by loosening its
feathers, the animal is able to trap more air between them. This
allows it to retain more heat since the captive air helps insulate the
bird from its cooler surroundings.
SleepThe most common reason a
parakeet swells its feathers is that it the animal is tired and
preparing for a nap. The fluffing action prevents heat loss during the
bird’s period o

Pets

While using a VOIP application to communicate with your friends and
family when doing an activity such as playing a video game, you may
wish to avoid having to press a button each time you wish to talk. The
reason most VOIP applications default to the push-to-talk method is to
avoid a constantly open microphone. However, if you are communicating
with close friends and family, this is not as important. Fortunately,
with Ventrilo you have the option to talk without having the need for
pushing a button. This option is found within the application
setup.Difficulty:EasyInstructions Start the Ventrilo
program.
Click the «Setup» button. This loads a list of options for
your Ventrilo client.

Computers

Bungie parakeets are commonly sold in pet stores. They are not
considered an exotic bird, and the cost of the cage and accessories
can exceed the price of the bird. Bungies appeal to those who desire
an affordable feathered pet that will interact with humans, show
affection, learn tricks and even talk. IdentificationParakeets are
small birds which are members of the parrot family. Their feathers are
colorful, and might be green, red, blue, yellow, orange or purple. The
tails of some types of parakeets are short and square, while other
types have long pointed tails. Its beak is flush to its face, curved
in the same contour as its face and head.
FunctionParakeets are
popular pets. The bu

Pets

Parakeets are exotic birds from Australia, New Zealand, Asia, and
Central and South America. They have been enjoyed as pets worldwide
since ancient times. Parakeets are intelligent, have outgoing
personalities and are friendly and active. They can be easily trained
and love to learn. To keep your parakeet healthy, feed him a variety
of foods. Basic DietThe basis of a parakeet’s diet will center
around a good-quality, organic if you can find it, seed mix developed
for parakeets. Read the box to determine if the mix contains
potentially harmful additives. A good mix will contain bits of dried
fruit, veggies and possibly even herbs and greens. Some might even
contain bee pollen, which is con

Pets

bighow.org

Parakeet Talk.

This community has had several posts in the past,  made by people whose birds are in obvious need of medical care,  and the people seem to be seeking reassurance that neglecting their bird (by denying them veterinary attention) is okay.

Birds need yearly medical check ups. (for an avian vet in your area, vist www.aav.org . They also need medical care if any change in behavior lasts more than a day,  if your bird has been in an accident or if your bird shows signs of illness.

As you know,  budgies are prey animals.  They are experts at hiding illnesses:  they have to be, or they would not have survived as a species.  If you notice any sign of illness (change in sleep pattern,  consistency or quantity of droppings,  weight loss amounting to 10% or more of total weight,  fluffed up feathers,  droppings stuck to vent feathers,  any change in behavior lasting more than a day,  change in eating/drinking patterns,  etc.) your bird needs to see a vet.  It might be nothing big… or it might be something very serious.

This means if your bird is attacked by your dog,  falls into a pond or a bag of carpet cleaner,  or is covered in blood,  your bird needs to see a vet even if she is still alive. You could easily mistake your bird for being fine,  and wake up the next morning to find her dead due to unforseen complications.

Can’t afford a vet?  Most will work out payment plans.  If you still can’t afford a vet,  you need to find a home for your bird with someone who can.  Thats the plain and simple truth.

Joy had a vet checkup about a week ago,  and the vet discovered an infection in a sore I wasn’t even aware Joy had.

I consider myself to be a fairly capable pet owner: I did more than my share of research before I brought my baby home  Still,  Joy could have easily died from something I was completely unaware of untill the vet found it.

If you can’t afford the vet,  you can’t afford the pet.  Its that simple.  I’m sorry to be harsh,  but sometimes it needs to be said.  I can’t comprehend how people can take a defenseless animal into their home and then give it substandard care.  I leave you with a poem:

 

A Cheap Bird’s Plea
by Joyce Glass

What is it that my life is worth
How much will you pay
To what extent would you go
If I get ill today?

I know I’m not an expensive bird
My cost is fairly cheap
But what is the price you put on life
For something that you keep?

My wings still spread out the same
My heart still has a beat
So why is it that my cousins
Are the ones you hold so sweet?

  I cannot help that I was born
Without a golden egg
Will you still take care of me
Or make me plead and beg?

I rely on you to help me
As I can’t do it for myself
Will you take the steps needed
Or just put me on the shelf?

So when you walk by me
Please look me in the eye
If it would come down to it
Would I live or die?

parakeet-talk.livejournal.com

Are boy parakeets easier to train to talk

Parakeets are EXTREMELY smart and friendly. It always breaks my heart to see a parakeet stuffed into a cage, never let out, never interacted with. Parakeets are flock birds! They thrive on being cuddled, being nuzzled, having that physical interaction with their flock. And if there is only one parak…eet in the cage, that flock is you! Hand training is a critical part of owning and raising a happy parakeet. If you have already Bought a New Parakeet and Gotten the Parakeet Used to your Home it’s time to now start hand-training it. You can’t let a parakeet out to fly around the room until it understands that your hand is safe, and that your finger is a perch it should hop onto when you say «UP». So you need to work on this next. If your parakeet was hand-raised, this is probably easy. Your parakeet probably already knows the command «up». Simply put your hand SLOWLY into the cage, talking nicely to it. Then gently press your finger against its chest and say «UP» in a gentle but firm voice. She should step up onto your finger. Keep it still and say things like «good bird» in a soft, soothing voice. If your parakeet does this easily, then you’re already ready for it to come out and enjoy a bit of flying around. However, let’s say you had to buy your keet from a Bin O Budgies and it is very skittish. You have to train it that you are a friend and to be trusted. Follow the step by step instructions below, and in a few weeks you will have a parakeet that will be your loving companion for years and years. DO NOT SKIP A STEP. Be sure to fully be complete with a step before moving on to the next. This is very important in having this training work properly!.
STEP ONE — TRUSTING THE HAND In step one, you simply get your parakeet used to your hand being in the cage. STEP TWO — PERCH TRAINING In step two, you train your parakeet to step up onto a perch on command. STEP THREE — FINGER-PERCH TRAINING In step three, you show your parakeet that it’s OK to step on a perch that also has a finger attached to it. STEP FOUR — FINGER TRAINING In step four, still staying just in the cage, your parakeet learns that your finger is a safe perch to sit on. STEP FIVE — OUT-OF-CAGE FINGER TRAINING In step five, the parakeet learns that her trusted finger is safe to sit on, even if it’s outside the cage. The more you interact with your parakeet, the friendlier he will get! Soon you’ll find he loves hanging out on your shoulder while you do things, nibbling on earrings or necklaces. When I work at my computer, my parakeets hang out on the curtain rod right next to me, chirping down at me. Remember, none of this will happen instantly. If you bought a hand raised parakeet it might all happen on the first day — but people who buy budgies out of large bins are in essence buying wild birds. It can easily take several weeks to get your budgie used to you as a trusted person. You have to be patient and work on this every day, to let your parakeet learn about you and learn to trust you. It can’t be rushed. Parakeets are extremely intelligent and need to learn to trust you on their own time. Parakeets do NOT BITE unless they are being threatened. So as long as you are quiet and gentle and friendly with your parakeet, you will have a quite loving companion! (MORE)

pets.answers.com

Teaching a Parakeet to Talk

The key to teaching a parakeet to talk is to have the parakeet think it’s part of the «human flock», and therefore that it needs to communicate with its human friends. If you have a mirror in the cage, or other parakeets, it will see parakeets around it and want to talk like them (i.e. chirp). So step one is to have your young parakeet on its own, surrounded by humans that talk to it.


Nazo chats with her mirror buddy

The younger the better, as in all things that involve learning. Get a hand fed parakeet if you can, at a very young age. That is when it’s still learning how to communicate, and talking «human» will be a valid option for it. While male parakeets tend to talk better than female parakeets do, both can certainly talk!

Birds learn best in the morning, when their mind is fresh and ready for new information. If you use a towel or cover over your bird’s cage, talk to them for 1/2 hr before you remove it each morning. Repeat the same phrases loudly, slowly and clearly. Parakeets do best with hard letters like K and T, so the traditional «hello» is actually sort of hard for a Parakeet. «Cutie» would be much better! Parakeets tend to mumble and to talk quickly, so the more slowly you talk, the more normal it will sound when the bird starts to repeat it.

Have patience, and eventually your parakeet will start to answer back to you! Once they get the hang of it, they’ll learn more and more quickly as you go. While you can try taping yourself and playing the tape, the parakeet really needs to learn that this is a way for you and it to talk to each other. So it works best if you physically talk to your parakeet, and that you do it often.

Parakeets can also learn to mimic other sounds around them. They can learn to chirp like a cell phone, whistle a short tune, and much more! I’ve taught my parakeets to sing like chickadees, which drives the chickadees outside the windows crazy 🙂

Parakeet Info Homepage

Cat / Parakeet Info Homepage


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www.lisashea.com

How to Teach a Parakeet to Talk

In my opinion, budgies are the best kind of bird to make part of your family. Training your pet to talk is all about personality, bonding, and repetition.

I received my first parakeet as a Christmas gift when I was 17 years old. He was just old enough to be on his own, so he bonded well and learned his first word very quickly. He meowed. I had a cat that wanted to «bond» with my bird, too. That is why I hung his cage from my ceiling—to keep the cat from «bonding.»

Therefore, she would sit under the cage or right outside the window and meow . . . for hours and hours. She would sit there, regardless of putting food in her dish. She would sit there, in spite of being chased away dozens of times throughout the day. She would just sit there and «meow.» I had to lock her in the bathroom when I took Baby out of his cage. I would repeat phrases and hold him to my cheek. I would carry him around on my shoulder and talk to him.

«Hello, Baby!» I would repeat.

«Meow,” was the response.

«Want a treat!» I would say, holding a piece of apple in front of him.

«Meow.»

It took him one week to learn to meow. It took him five more weeks to say, «Hello Baby!»

Why was that? My cat was a better trainer than I was, I suppose.

Within a year, Baby was the unfortunate victim of a pet sitter who did not have a clue what she was doing. I have to take some blame as I should not have placed the responsibility on someone who did not have experience or feel comfortable with birds.

It took seven more years before I felt confident enough to get another bird. We had thought «she» was a «he» and we had purposely bought a male because we had heard that males were the only ones that would speak. But this budgie was a young female and thankfully, what we had heard was wrong. I carried her home in her little box and put her directly into the huge cage my husband had put together for her. By this time, we had three small children and we all took part in bonding and training her to speak. Of course, the first phrase Marilyn (then called «Merlin») popped out with was from my husband.

«Sexy bird!» She would declare and then make kissing noises.

Years later, our budgie had a huge vocabulary and not all of the words she learned came from us trying to teach her. She would surprise us at least once a week with a new phrase.

«The timer went off!» She declared when the oven would buzz.

«Take a shower and brush your teeth!» she would remind the children when they came downstairs in the morning.

«Excuse me!» she would shout when someone belched.

She loved people who were afraid of birds. We kept her cage open most of the time and when we had unexpected company, she absolutely refused to go inside. She would perch on heads and declare her love instead and the more afraid they were, the more she loved them.

pethelpful.com

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