Calf raises – Calf raises — Wikipedia

Calf raises — Wikipedia

Calf raises are a method of exercising the gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior and soleus muscles of the lower leg. The movement performed is plantar flexion, a.k.a. ankle extension.

Bent-knee[edit]

Calf raises are sometimes done with a flexed knee, usually roughly 90 degrees. This lessens the stretch in the gastrocnemius (a knee flexor), so the movement is done to emphasize the soleus.

Seated[edit]

Bent-knee calf raises are frequently done in a seated position for comfort. Since the weight of the upper body is rested on the seat, resistance is frequently added. Using bodyweight, one leg could be draped across the other (through external rotation) to exercise unilaterally and double the weight lifted.

It can also be executed by using a weight, such as a barbell, to provide resistance to the action of the calf muscles. The exercise is performed from a seated position while the weight rests on the upper leg, just above the knee. The person engaged in this exercise lifts the weight by pushing down on the balls of the feet.[1]

Due to the discomfort of higher weights on a bar, barbells used for seated calf raises are frequently padded or wrapped in a towel. There are also seated calf raise machines designed using levers that have pads built into them to protect the patella, quadriceps and tendons.

Bridging[edit]

Bridging exercises are done with a flexed knee to lessen the stretch on the hamstring (a knee flexor) and focus the hip extension work on the gluteus maximus. In that same respect, the reduced knee flexion makes plantar flexion work comparable to a seated calf raise, due to the lessened stretch on the gastrocnemius (like the hamstring, also a knee flexor).

Since the pelvis is in the air, its weight can be shifted onto the feet allowing greater resistance.

This is an awkward exercise due to the reduced stability and difficulty in adding resistance. If one were to raise a leg, the use of the arms to avoid falling sideways would often by necessary. If one were to place a padded barbell on the upper quadriceps to add resistance, this would make the arms less able to stabilize, requiring core stabilization.

Straight-knee[edit]

Pushing with the foot with a straighter knee stretches the gastrocnemius more, these movements incorporate it better. The soleus still contributes, usually allowing people to lift more weight.

Standing[edit]

en.wikipedia.org

Calf raises — Wikipedia

Calf raises are a method of exercising the gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior and soleus muscles of the lower leg. The movement performed is plantar flexion, a.k.a. ankle extension.

Bent-knee[edit]

Calf raises are sometimes done with a flexed knee, usually roughly 90 degrees. This lessens the stretch in the gastrocnemius (a knee flexor), so the movement is done to emphasize the soleus.

Seated[edit]

Bent-knee calf raises are frequently done in a seated position for comfort. Since the weight of the upper body is rested on the seat, resistance is frequently added. Using bodyweight, one leg could be draped across the other (through external rotation) to exercise unilaterally and double the weight lifted.

It can also be executed by using a weight, such as a barbell, to provide resistance to the action of the calf muscles. The exercise is performed from a seated position while the weight rests on the upper leg, just above the knee. The person engaged in this exercise lifts the weight by pushing down on the balls of the feet.[1]

Due to the discomfort of higher weights on a bar, barbells used for seated calf raises are frequently padded or wrapped in a towel. There are also seated calf raise machines designed using levers that have pads built into them to protect the patella, quadriceps and tendons.

Bridging[edit]

Bridging exercises are done with a flexed knee to lessen the stretch on the hamstring (a knee flexor) and focus the hip extension work on the gluteus maximus. In that same respect, the reduced knee flexion makes plantar flexion work comparable to a seated calf raise, due to the lessened stretch on the gastrocnemius (like the hamstring, also a knee flexor).

Since the pelvis is in the air, its weight can be shifted onto the feet allowing greater resistance.

This is an awkward exercise due to the reduced stability and difficulty in adding resistance. If one were to raise a leg, the use of the arms to avoid falling sideways would often by necessary. If one were to place a padded barbell on the upper quadriceps to add resistance, this would make the arms less able to stabilize, requiring core stabilization.

Straight-knee[edit]

Pushing with the foot with a straighter knee stretches the gastrocnemius more, these movements incorporate it better. The soleus still contributes, usually allowing people to lift more weight.

Standing[edit]

Standing bilateral calf raise with machine start

Standing bilateral calf raise with machine end

Standing unilateral calf raise with a dumbbell

Standing calf raises are executed with one or both feet. They are frequently done on a raised surface with the heel lower than the toes to allow a greater stretch on the working muscles. The exercise is performed by raising the heel as far as possible. Weights or other methods of providing resistance are commonly used, but the exercise is also effective with body weight alone.[2]

Balance may become a difficulty with free-standing calf raises, especially with one-legged variations. Due to this, it is common to hang on to something or lean the hand against a wall for stability. They are also performed using Smith machines or using machines specially designed for calf raises with padded anchors for the weight that rest on the shoulders.

Leg press[edit]

A straight-knee calf raise is often done using the leg press machine. The sled is kept nearly locked out and the exerciser is meant to keep the hip and knee joints immobile. This is not a bodyweight exercise, the only body part actually being lifted is the small weight of the foot. The resistance comes from the sled.

A leg press is easy to stabilize and the safety bar is kept in place so if the person can not lift it, it should come down safely.

Exercise notes[edit]

It is not uncommon to hear of some fitness trainers using reps of 50 or more, as they believe the gastrocnemius is composed of slow twitch fibers which benefit from lower weights and higher repetitions.[3] This is not correct. The gastrocnemius is actually made up of fast twitch muscle fibers, which benefit more from heavy loads and low reps (6–8) on the standing calf raise.[4] The soleus, on the other hand, is another plantarflexor of the ankle. The soleus is a slow twitch muscle and will benefit from high reps and lower loads on the seated calf raise.[5]

References[edit]

en.wikiyy.com

calf raises Wikipedia

Calf raises are a method of exercising the gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior and soleus muscles of the lower leg. The movement performed is plantar flexion, a.k.a. ankle extension.

Bent-knee[]

Calf raises are sometimes done with a flexed knee, usually roughly 90 degrees. This lessens the stretch in the gastrocnemius (a knee flexor), so the movement is done to emphasize the soleus.

Seated[]

Bent-knee calf raises are frequently done in a seated position for comfort. Since the weight of the upper body is rested on the seat, resistance is frequently added. Using bodyweight, one leg could be draped across the other (through external rotation) to exercise unilaterally and double the weight lifted.

It can also be executed by using a weight, such as a barbell, to provide resistance to the action of the calf muscles. The exercise is performed from a seated position while the weight rests on the upper leg, just above the knee. The person engaged in this exercise lifts the weight by pushing down on the balls of the feet.[1]

Due to the discomfort of higher weights on a bar, barbells used for seated calf raises are frequently padded or wrapped in a towel. There are also seated calf raise machines designed using levers that have pads built into them to protect the patella, quadriceps and tendons.

Bridging[]

Bridging exercises are done with a flexed knee to lessen the stretch on the hamstring (a knee flexor) and focus the hip extension work on the gluteus maximus. In that same respect, the reduced knee flexion makes plantar flexion work comparable to a seated calf raise, due to the lessened stretch on the gastrocnemius (like the hamstring, also a knee flexor).

Since the pelvis is in the air, its weight can be shifted onto the feet allowing greater resistance.

This is an awkward exercise due to the reduced stability and difficulty in adding resistance. If one were to raise a leg, the use of the arms to avoid falling sideways would often by necessary. If one were to place a padded barbell on the upper quadriceps to add resistance, this would make the arms less able to stabilize, requiring core stabilization.

Straight-knee[]

Pushing with the foot with a straighter knee stretches the gastrocnemius more, these movements incorporate it better. The soleus still contributes, usually allowing people to lift more weight.

Standing[]

Standing bilateral calf raise with machine start

Standing bilateral calf raise with machine end

Standing unilateral calf raise with a dumbbell

Standing calf raises are executed with one or both feet. They are frequently done on a raised surface with the heel lower than the toes to allow a greater stretch on the working muscles. The exercise is performed by raising the heel as far as possible. Weights or other methods of providing resistance are commonly used, but the exercise is also effective with body weight alone.[2]

Balance may become a difficulty with free-standing calf raises, especially with one-legged variations. Due to this, it is common to hang on to something or lean the hand against a wall for stability. They are also performed using Smith machines or using machines specially designed for calf raises with padded anchors for the weight that rest on the shoulders.

Leg press[]

A straight-knee calf raise is often done using the leg press machine. The sled is kept nearly locked out and the exerciser is meant to keep the hip and knee joints immobile. This is not a bodyweight exercise, the only body part actually being lifted is the small weight of the foot. The resistance comes from the sled.

A leg press is easy to stabilize and the safety bar is kept in place so if the person can not lift it, it should come down safely.

Exercise notes[]

It is not uncommon to hear of some fitness trainers using reps of 50 or more, as they believe the gastrocnemius is composed of slow twitch fibers which benefit from lower weights and higher repetitions.[3] This is not correct. The gastrocnemius is actually made up of fast twitch muscle fibers, which benefit more from heavy loads and low reps (6–8) on the standing calf raise.[4] The soleus, on the other hand, is another plantarflexor of the ankle. The soleus is a slow twitch muscle and will benefit from high reps and lower loads on the seated calf raise.[5]

References[]

en.wikibedia.ru

How to Do the Standing Calf Raise

  1. Health
  2. Exercise
  3. How to Do the Standing Calf Raise

The standing calf raise exercise targets your calf muscles, particularly the larger, outermost muscle that is responsible for the shape and size of your calves.

Performing the standing calf raise

Follow these steps to perform this exercise:

  1. Stand on the edge of a step.

    Or, if you have a step-aerobics platform, place two sets of risers underneath the platform.

  2. Stand tall with your abdominals pulled in, the balls of your feet firmly planted on the step, and your heels hanging over the edge.

    Rest your hands against a wall or a sturdy object for balance.

  3. Raise your heels a few inches above the edge of the step so that you’re on your tiptoes.

  4. Hold the position for a moment, and then lower your heels below the platform, feeling a stretch in your calf muscles.

    Credit: Photograph by Sunstreak Productions, Inc.

    The standing calf raise works your calf muscles.

Tips for doing the standing calf raise

Keep these tips in mind as you perform this exercise:

  • Lift as high as you can onto your toes and lower your heels down as much as your ankle flexibility allows.

  • Push evenly through the entire width of your foot. Don’t push off from your big toe or the outside edge of your feet.

Gym alternative: Toe press on the leg-press machine

Perform a toe press on the leg-press machine at your gym as an alternative to using dumbbells for this exercise. Follow these steps to perform the toe press on the leg-press machine:

  1. Lie on the leg-press machine with your shoulders snugly underneath the pad.

  2. To lift the weight stack, straighten your legs completely, and carefully walk your feet down the foot platform until your heels hang off the end.

  3. Keeping your legs straight, rise up on your tiptoes as high as you can and then lower down until your heels are below the level of the foot plate.

  4. After you complete all the reps, carefully walk your feet back to the center of the foot plate before bending your knees and lowering the weights.

    Credit: Photograph by Sunstreak Productions, Inc.

    As an alternative to the standing calf raise, try the toe press on the leg-press machine.


www.dummies.com

Calf raises • Wikipedia

Calf raises are a method of exercising the gastrocnemius, tibialis posterior and soleus muscles of the lower leg. The movement performed is plantar flexion, a.k.a. ankle extension.

Bent-knee

[
edit
]

Calf raises are sometimes done with a flexed knee, usually roughly 90 degrees. This lessens the stretch in the gastrocnemius (a knee flexor), so the movement is done to emphasize the soleus.

Seated

[
edit
]

Bent-knee calf raises are frequently done in a seated position for comfort. Since the weight of the upper body is rested on the seat, resistance is frequently added. Using bodyweight, one leg could be draped across the other (through external rotation) to exercise unilaterally and double the weight lifted.

It can also be executed by using a weight, such as a barbell, to provide resistance to the action of the calf muscles. The exercise is performed from a seated position while the weight rests on the upper leg, just above the knee. The person engaged in this exercise lifts the weight by pushing down on the balls of the feet.[1]

Due to the discomfort of higher weights on a bar, barbells used for seated calf raises are frequently padded or wrapped in a towel. There are also seated calf raise machines designed using levers that have pads built into them to protect the patella, quadriceps and tendons.

Bridging

[
edit
]

Bridging exercises are done with a flexed knee to lessen the stretch on the hamstring (a knee flexor) and focus the hip extension work on the gluteus maximus. In that same respect, the reduced knee flexion makes plantar flexion work comparable to a seated calf raise, due to the lessened stretch on the gastrocnemius (like the hamstring, also a knee flexor).

Since the pelvis is in the air, its weight can be shifted onto the feet allowing greater resistance.

This is an awkward exercise due to the reduced stability and difficulty in adding resistance. If one were to raise a leg, the use of the arms to avoid falling sideways would often by necessary. If one were to place a padded barbell on the upper quadriceps to add resistance, this would make the arms less able to stabilize, requiring core stabilization.

Straight-knee

[
edit
]

Pushing with the foot with a straighter knee stretches the gastrocnemius more, these movements incorporate it better. The soleus still contributes, usually allowing people to lift more weight.

Standing

[
edit
]

Standing bilateral calf raise with machine start

Standing bilateral calf raise with machine end

Standing unilateral calf raise with a dumbbell

Standing calf raises are executed with one or both feet. They are frequently done on a raised surface with the heel lower than the toes to allow a greater stretch on the working muscles. The exercise is performed by raising the heel as far as possible. Weights or other methods of providing resistance are commonly used, but the exercise is also effective with body weight alone.[2]

Balance may become a difficulty with free-standing calf raises, especially with one-legged variations. Due to this, it is common to hang on to something or lean the hand against a wall for stability. They are also performed using Smith machines or using machines specially designed for calf raises with padded anchors for the weight that rest on the shoulders.

Leg press

[
edit
]

A straight-knee calf raise is often done using the leg press machine. The sled is kept nearly locked out and the exerciser is meant to keep the hip and knee joints immobile. This is not a bodyweight exercise, the only body part actually being lifted is the small weight of the foot. The resistance comes from the sled.

A leg press is easy to stabilize and the safety bar is kept in place so if the person can not lift it, it should come down safely.

Exercise notes

[
edit
]

It is not uncommon to hear of some fitness trainers using reps of 50 or more, as they believe the gastrocnemius is composed of slow twitch fibers which benefit from lower weights and higher repetitions.[3] This is not correct. The gastrocnemius is actually made up of fast twitch muscle fibers, which benefit more from heavy loads and low reps (6–8) on the standing calf raise.[4] The soleus, on the other hand, is another plantarflexor of the ankle. The soleus is a slow twitch muscle and will benefit from high reps and lower loads on the seated calf raise.[5]

References

[
edit
]

wikipedia.moesalih.com

Why Calf Raises Are a Waste of Time

Working your calf muscles is typically considered part of a complete lower-body workout. You need to work your calves, because you can’t ignore such a large and important muscle group. But the best way to train these muscles may be different from what you think.

Calf Anatomy

Your calves are comprised of two muscles: the gastrocnemius and the soleus. Both are responsible for plantarflexion, or extending the ankle. The gastrocnemius is located in the bulge of your calf, comprised of 18 to 64 percent fast-twitch muscle fibers. It’s ideally suited for power moves such as sprinting and jumping, but the amount of power it can generate depends on the number of fast-twitch fibers. The more, the better. The soleus is located behind the grastrocnemius. It consists of 80 to 100 percent slow-twitch fibers, making it ideal for endurance activity like walking or jogging.

«The calves are the first major muscles that activate after ground contact,» says Mark Kovacs, a world-renowned performance physiologist and executive director of the International Tennis Performance Association. «Athletes need to have good strength in both the gastrocnemius and soleus to be able to effectively push off the ground.»

Training Your Calves

We all agree you need to work your calf muscles. The traditional go-to exercise is the Calf Raise. The movement is simple—you extend your ankles against resistance to strengthen your calves. Do enough reps, and you’ll feel like your calves are about to pop out of your legs.

So, this is effective, right? Yes, but only to an extent.

Isolating your calves with this type of movement builds a foundation of strength, especially if you are new to strength training. But, so do exercises like Squats and Lunges, which also hit other muscle groups. «The Calf Raise establishes a base level of strength,» says Kovacs. «If you’re doing compound movements, then you’re getting some pretty good calf development already. Isolated strength work isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it may not be the best use of your time.»

Also, it’s not critical for your calf muscles to be super strong. It’s actually very difficult to increase calf size. You don’t want weak calves, but it’s more important that your calves are powerful. Rapid calf contractions limit ground contact time when running, which helps you run faster. Also, the muscles add power to explosive movements and skills, like jumping or throwing a ball.

Kovacs says, «Doing some isolated work can be productive, but make sure it’s a higher velocity isolated calf movement.» Rather than loading up the Calf Raise machine, he recommends Single-Leg Hops or Taps, but with the knee straight. They allow you to isolate the calves in an explosive movement, like Henrik Zetterberg’s Eccentric Calf Raise.

Effective Calf Exercises

Perform each of these exercises with your knees straight but not locked out.

Single-Leg Explosive Calf Raises

  • Stand on one foot on a stair with your heel hanging off the step.
  • Keeping your knee straight, slowly lower your heel.
  • Forcefully extend your ankle as far as range of motion allows.
  • Repeat for the specified number of reps.

Sets/Reps: 3×6-8 each leg

Single-Leg Mini-Hurdle Hops

  • Set up 6-8 hurdles in a straight line, about 2 feet apart.
  • Hop through the hurdles on one leg, spending as little time on the ground as possible.

Sets/Reps: 2-3×6-8 each leg

Single-Leg Box Hops

  • Stand on one leg with a 4- to 6-inch box in front of you.
  • Hop up to the box, extending your ankles to generate momentum.
  • Hop down and immediately repeat.

Sets/Reps: 3×6-8 each leg

RELATED: Why You Should Never Do Leg Extensions

Reference:

Gollnick, P.D., et. al. (1974) «Human soleus muscle: A comparison of fiber composition and enzyme activities with other leg muscles.» Pflügers Archive, 348(3): 247–55.

Photo Credit: Getty Images // Thinkstock

www.stack.com

Standing Barbell Calf Raise | Exercise Videos & Guides

  1. This exercise is best performed inside a squat rack for safety purposes. To begin, first set the bar on a rack that best matches your height. Once the correct height is chosen and the bar is loaded, step under the bar and place the bar on the back of your shoulders (slightly below the neck).
  2. Hold on to the bar using both arms at each side and lift it off the rack by first pushing with your legs and at the same time straightening your torso.
  3. Step away from the rack and position your legs using a shoulder width medium stance with the toes slightly pointed out. Keep your head up at all times as looking down will get you off balance and also maintain a straight back. The knees should be kept with a slight bend; never locked. This will be your starting position. Tip: For better range of motion you may also place the ball of your feet on a wooden block but be careful as this option requires more balance and a sturdy block.
  4. Raise your heels as you breathe out by extending your ankles as high as possible and flexing your calf. Ensure that the knee is kept stationary at all times. There should be no bending at any time. Hold the contracted position by a second before you start to go back down.
  5. Go back slowly to the starting position as you breathe in by lowering your heels as you bend the ankles until calves are stretched.
  6. Repeat for the recommended amount of repetitions.

Caution: If you suffer from lower back problems, a better exercise is the calf press as during a standing calf raise the back has to support the weight being lifted. Also, maintain your back straight and stationary at all times. Rounding of the back can cause lower back injury.

Variations: There are several other ways to perform a standing calf raise. A calf press machine instead of a squat rack can be used as well as dumbbells with one leg or two legs at a time. A smith machine can be used for calf raises as well. You can also perform the barbell calf raise using a piece of wood to place the ball of the foot. This will allow you to get a better range of motion. However be cautious as in this case you will need to balance yourself much better.

www.bodybuilding.com

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